Government

Job ad scam artist pleads guilty

Frantzy Morisset pleaded guilty to identity theft and fraud for posting bogus ads for jobs at Microsoft.

It seems at least one Internet scam artist will be spending some time behind bars. Frantzy Morisset recently pleaded guilty to posting bogus Microsoft job ads. The poorly written ads, which ran on Monster and CareerBuilder, read "Microsoft Corporation is now seeking for [sic] bright jobseekers who think big and dream big to fill out many open positions."

The ad promised work-from-home positions that paid between $15 and $25 per hour. Of course, those who responded to the ad were asked for personal information such as their date of birth, Social Security number, and detailed banking information.

Morisset pleaded guilty last week to charges of identity theft, computer trespassing, and fraud and is now facing between 16 months and four years in prison.

His sentencing is set for May 21 in New York State Supreme Court.

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Toni Bowers is Managing Editor of TechRepublic and is the award-winning blogger of the Career Management blog. She has edited newsletters, books, and web sites pertaining to software, IT career, and IT management issues.

32 comments
hussain_sarfraz
hussain_sarfraz

Good work, the other should also be treated similarly, but with strong punishment

jdclyde
jdclyde

Give him the same treatment "addicts" got.

lafeyette_management
lafeyette_management

And I know how it feels, and what a PITA it is to have to renew fraud security alerts every three months. The worst part is that I know who did it, but there is nothing I can do about it. As to these other identity thieves who have been caught, I agree that 16 months to four years is small price to pay for all the lives they have made harder, if not ruined. But I do not agree that executing them or enslaving them is the answer, as the first lowers us to their level, and the second simply places a burden on the person held accountable for the "slave's" actions, as well as opening up the door to all kinds of abuse and misuse of others in the name of "punitive enslavement". Personally, I think that punishments and societal retribution is highly overrated. Certainly forcing the general populace to pay for the upkeep and housing of delinquents like this through higher taxes is wrong, but, what punishment is there that can be swiftly and efficiently--and fairly--meeted out without imposing a penalty (such as higher taxes or additional risk) on an innocent society? Perhaps a combination of chipping and identity marking (adding a record to their electronic credit history, credit report, police records, etc. is one thought. ) Another thought might be placing a permanent mark on their person, e.g. "IT" for "Identity Thief" on thir skin (hand or face) would be effective. Unfortunately, none of these penalties prevents them from accessing a computer and misusing it to further their crimes. While execution seems to be the easy way out, I cannot accept that option. After all, what if someone is tried, found guilty, and executed as an identity-thief, only to learn afterward that the accused had actually been innocent and the alligations were falsified? Imagine if that innocent person who had just died for crimes he or she did not commit was, in fact, your wife or your husband. What then? I don't have an answer, but I feel that, perhaps my questions could open this forum to a discussion that might produce a response more eloquent, practical and useful than repeated vows of support for execution.

RCBrown
RCBrown

I don't think 16 months is long enough; I hope he gets the maximum.

TheSwabbie
TheSwabbie

Why don't we start Executing these people? That will stop Identity theft :) (wonder how bad I'll get flamed for that one?) ha ha

OntheEdge
OntheEdge

I used to say we need to bring back pubic execusions however, maybe a better way is to make them the slave of the person they impersonate. After 4 years of slavery they wouldn't be so willing to do it again...

lafeyette_management
lafeyette_management

I assume you meant "public". But your email gives me what I think would be a very good idea: The punishment for identity theft should be a "pubic execution", that is, the offender is publicly sterilized and then their reproductive organs are removed. What additional punishments society chooses to impose may very by crime, but I think that the threat of immediate, possibly public, sterilization and removal of the reproductive organs would probably be a rather effective deterrent.

TheSwabbie
TheSwabbie

Wow - Please tell me when you are elected to office in your state...you are one scary dude. LOL

TheSwabbie
TheSwabbie

Hey guys/gals...I wasnt serious about executing people for identity theft (you could threaten them with it tho!). ALTHOUGH - I'm totally for capital punishment for Murder, Rape of Children etc. I wish they had much stiffer sentences for Identity theft, I mean like 10 years or more - Hard labor, breaking rocks kinda stuff...put them in pink jump suits and hit the highways with chains around their ankles. I could think of all kinds of humiliating things to keep them busy for years. :)

william.burgesen
william.burgesen

If you make them their slave then the person they scammed will be responsible for the well being - you know food, shelter, etc... Plus your giving them another opportunity to steal their identity. Execution solves repeat offending and those trying to escape. I think you would have fewer escape attempts if you had more executions - but then you better be sure your executing the right person, We had a girl murdered here in MN when she responded to a babysitting ad on Craig's list - how does Craig sleep at night :)

RFink
RFink

Execute all prisoners with life terms. Why keep them in prison at our expense for years? I can't think of any reasons. They will never become a productive member of society. They have turned into parasites. Kill them all! This will put an end to repeat offenders. I can't think of a better way to lower the crime rate, save money on prisions and provide closure for the victims and their families.

apotheon
apotheon

I don't have a problem with that approach in theory. In practice, however, there are many wrongly convicted people serving life sentences at any given time -- and I can't condone executing them. Give 'em a chance to appeal their convictions, at least.

kingttx
kingttx

Remember that guy in Florida that ran from police and got eaten by an alligator? That gives me an idea... ;) EDIT: wrong animal EDIT2: correcting grammar, TYVM

techrepublic
techrepublic

Why was the alligator running from the police? And then why did he stop for a snack?

kingttx
kingttx

Yep, grammar police busted me. ;)

jason
jason

They know what they are doing. They set out to destroy other people's lives for greedy financial gain. So let's ruin their lives. Execute them.

TheSwabbie
TheSwabbie

At least I wont be the only one getting flamed! Truthfully though, youre right. They need SERIOUS jail time (Prison). I'm talking 10-15-20 years or more. I mean lock them up and throw away the key. Make it so bad that they will get ulcers worrying about getting caught. Because - If someone stole my identity and "I" was able to track them down they would WISH they were in prison! There are ome things in life I do not tolerate... Murderers, Rapist, Child Molesters & and the like.. & THIEVES.

tomh
tomh

Right on!

Kam Guerra
Kam Guerra

You still have hundreds of lying corporate recruiters who'll say anything to get you in the door. They'll be misleading about pay, benefits, working conditions, expectations, location ... Let's see if the prosecutor go after the some of the companies listed at http://www.washingtontechnology.com/top-100/2007/ that post misleading ads on Monster and CareerBuilder.

Ollie J
Ollie J

How many time do you apply for a position and have to send in CV's only to be told that the role has been filled internally but "Could they use your CV for further recruitment with other organisations?" Such spoofing is annoying and technically (i believe) illegal but, unfortunately, not worth anyone's time to punish.

james.evangelos
james.evangelos

That's why an offer is just dust in the wind, unless it is written on paper.

wblacroix
wblacroix

I Don't think four years is nearly enough. The bad apples out there need to know that these scams and identity theft is NOT OK. Also, more investigations and prosecutions are needed to further emphasize that this stuff is NOT going to be allowed.

jhussher
jhussher

Career Builder is at much at fault for allowing these scam job ads to be posted.

boxfiddler
boxfiddler

how difficult is it to notice the atrocious grammar? Arrogant and goofy as MS is, would a search for employees post look like that? I think not.

design
design

often the bad grammar is on purpose. It is skilled copywriting which helps prequalify the intellect or language skills of the respondent to be less than par. It makes it easier for them to manipulate people who have trouble understanding or communicating clearly.

alex.a
alex.a

Maybe someone will turn their attention to Craigs List now.

TheSwabbie
TheSwabbie

Man, you REALLY have to watch you back on that site. I've had people try to scam me all over the place for just about everything you can think of - even animals! Had one person try to basically "Steal" one of our puppies. I cannot repeat what I said to that person on here :)

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