Tech & Work

Negotiating a higher salary: How women differ from men

Results from a study from Carnegie Mellon University demonstrate how vastly different men and women are in their approaches to salary negotiations.

Results from a study from Carnegie Mellon University demonstrate how vastly different men and women are in their approaches to salary negotiations.

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Here are some interesting, believable, yet totally depressing stats from Carnegie Mellon University. This list was compiled by Maureen McCarty of The Washington Post.

  • Women, on average, ask for 30 percent less money than males.
  • Men are four times more likely to negotiate a first salary than women.
  • Men are eight times more likely than women to negotiate their starting salary and benefits.
  • Women ask for raises or promotions 85 percent less often than their male counterparts.
  • In 2007, women who were full-time wage and salary workers earned 80 percent of their male counterpart's salary.
  • 20 percent of women (22 million people) say they never negotiate at all, even though they recognize negotiation as appropriate and even necessary.
  • 2.5 times more women than men said they feel "a great deal of apprehension" about negotiation.
  • When asked to pick metaphors for negotiations, men picked "winning a ball game match," while women picked "going to the dentist."

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Toni Bowers is Managing Editor of TechRepublic and is the award-winning blogger of the Career Management blog. She has edited newsletters, books, and web sites pertaining to software, IT career, and IT management issues.

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