IT Employment optimize

Nine tips for getting hired

Job seekers sometimes approach interviews too eager to please. Here are his tips for getting around that feeling and putting your best foot forward.

The problem with career advice, there's just so darn much of it out there. Everybody has a personal slant on how best to present yourself in an interview. It's refreshing to come across something as simple as a bulleted list of best practices to follow. That's why I like this advice, provided by Jim Camp, an internationally coach and trainer, and author of NO: The Only Negotiating System You Need for Work and Home.

Camp recognizes that job seekers feel like they're at a disadvantage. They go into the interview feeling nervous about rejection, ashamed of getting fired from their last job, or too anxious to please. He cautions however, that if you let such emotions and attitudes overtake you, you'll be unable to think about the challenges facing this company and unable to articulate why they need you and should hire you.

Here are his nine other tried-and-true tips to getting hired:

1. Do impeccable research on the company and position before the interview. Read recent business articles, visit the company's website, and read press releases and annual reports. Write down anything and everything about this company. 2. Don't try to impress them with your dress, attitude, or speech. It will backfire. Be honest, direct, and authentic. Look decent and be comfortable in your own skin. 3. Find out what your interviewer wants by asking questions. Your aim is to discover the company's problems, issues, and needs so you can position yourself as the solution. Example: "What are the biggest challenges facing your company?" 4. Ask interrogative-led questions--what, how, and why--to help YOU direct the dialogue. These get your interviewer spilling the beans. Example: "How do you see this position developing and changing over the next three years?" 5. Get your interviewer to reveal what a "good fit" means to them. Your objective is to find out how you might uniquely enhance this company. Example: "How would you describe your employees and the culture of this organization?" 6. Don't volunteer too much information. You might think your previous working environment is relevant. You might think your family life is important. You might think your hobbies are character revealing. But telling too much gives your interviewer fuel to make assumptions and draw conclusions about you. 7. Be a blank slate. Learn to clear your mind of assumptions, fears, and expectations so you will be emotionally neutral and can maintain an open-minded perspective. If you start to feel hopeful or fearful, needy or overconfident, drop your pen, shift in your chair, take a deep breath--do anything to distract yourself and get back to neutral. 8. Don't be needy. Neediness kills your advantage in a job interview. You do not NEED this job. You need water, food, and air. 9. Focus on what you can control. The only thing you can control in the interview is your behavior and your responses. Focus on listening carefully--taking notes if necessary--and on answering questions in such a way that you are always keeping your interviewer's requirements and goals in mind. Your answers should reflect how you fit in with this employer's aims and enhance the employer's objectives.

About

Toni Bowers is Managing Editor of TechRepublic and is the award-winning blogger of the Career Management blog. She has edited newsletters, books, and web sites pertaining to software, IT career, and IT management issues.

77 comments
Chester Li
Chester Li

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warrensharpe
warrensharpe

Fat burners very informative blog.this blog contain many useful things.A must read for everyone.

kschlotthauer
kschlotthauer

I have heard this so don't quote me on it. Watch what you put on your personal social sites (i.e. facebook, myspace etc). I have heard some companies will Google your name and see what comes up. Yes, everyone is entitled to their opinion on whatever floats their boat, but, if you put some salacious things or PICTURES, almost sure you won't get the call back. Try Googling your name and see what comes up. I have counseled my children and even my Ex-wife on keeping their private lives that....PRIVATE!. But, then when someone says something about something they said, then all heck breaks loose!....I just remind them of the fact that they asked for it!

tarose.trevor
tarose.trevor

...i utterly disagree with the whole approach of HR, i think there are very few of them who have a clue about anything (sorry guys if you work in the field, but i am entitled to my opinion, and i wouldnt hold this one if you didnt constantly give me so much evidence to support it)... and as a result of my own frustrations of dealing with finding a company & employer worthy of hiring me, and who actually have a recruitment process that would even consider me, i have given up and instead am working from home developing my own business plans... and whether i succeed or fail, its a lot better than putting up with the rubbish that is the job hunting scene... screw that, i've gone fishing ;-)

damarsh1
damarsh1

First I would like to say thanks for the article it was very informative. If you ask one hundred people what are the nine tips of getting hired, you will get one hundred different answers. As for the majority of the responses, I agree with starr.cruise's entry, I am still at the edge of my seat chuckling.

egalvezd
egalvezd

When I dated and receive the interviewer's name, I googled him. I could found his hobbies, past jobs, academical degrees, non-work activities, etc. a lot of valuable information to get connected during the interview

dsdaviau64
dsdaviau64

No wonder this country is so screwed up. Find out if the person is qualified or close to what you are looking for. 2) Make sure they have some morals and are trust worthily. 3) make sure that they are reliable and will show up to work on time and ready to work. No wonder everybody else in the world is out producing us and kicking our ass. Since I???m on the subject most HR departments don???t know jack and that???s why they are working in the HR department. Let???s just sit around and watch our country go down the drain because HR is to worried if someone is over dress or speaks to well or asks a question. Mean while back in China and India they hire people to work and yes even dare I say train them in the way they want things done.

chalicemedia
chalicemedia

1, research - paramount - but keep it in the vest. You want to be able to intelligently answer questions, not give the interviewer a lesson. 2. dress - for the HR interview, one step above company norms. If the norm is business casual, wear a jacket without a tie. If jacket and tie is standard code, wear a suit. For the hiring manager, however, dress AT the company norms. 3, 4 and 5 are pretty basic stuff, by the book. 6. Never, never volunteer any information that's not in response to a direct question. 7. The blank slate is good, but better yet. Carefully LISTEN to what the interviewer is really saying. DON'T be trying to anticipate the next question or answer and possibly miss something critical to the interview. 8. 9. These are also pretty much basics. What ever you do in these times, don't give the hiring manager any idea that you're interested in his job or anything at another level. No matter what company policy or your business education tell you, your job in an American corporation is ALWAYS to help your boss meet his personal agenda.

josinella
josinella

I enjoyed reading the article. I am job searching and I don't really know what to expect in an interview. This article helped give me perspective on how to approach the interview. Thanks!

tfoster9
tfoster9

This article is excellent. first it confronts those overwhelming emotions that one faces. than the article tells you how to effectively deal those emotions.

starr.cruise
starr.cruise

Well, I had to succumb to writing this because I couldn't keep it to myself any longer. But I have tell ALL OF YOU, I think you are the smartest, wittiest, most amusingly sarcastic group of "bloggers" or "commentors" I have ever read. I am not a "techie", I create access databases on a small scale and that's how I joined TechRepublic. But I began reading the articles because I usually liked the topics. But THEN I began reading the comments and I was HOOKED. I sometimes laugh so hard I cry, honestly, but the intelligence and great ideas that come through are wonderful as well. Oh God, and the witty sarcasm - I just can't get enough. I wish I worked with a bunch of you, truly. So, usually you are ALL correct in what you are saying because usually the articles revolve around some human element which is predictably unpredictable. PLEASE keep commenting. I feel like I already know some of you! I am a female and I will NEVER be able to read women's magazines again as they will pale in comparison. And I am NOT being sarcastic, promise.

plafata
plafata

Where I work in education you are interviewed by a panel of up to 12 people. There is a set of questions laid out before you, and each panel member asks a question from the list. You really do not have any way to ask them the types of questions as in the article as it is mainly one sided at this point. You do have a 30 second window at the end of the interview to say anything you want, but you don't have the time to go though everything you really want to ask. What do you suggest then?

Gis Bun
Gis Bun

I think some interviewers may get p?ssed off if you keep on asking too many questions and they have to answer some which they may not want to do.

Tony Hopkinson
Tony Hopkinson

with my sartorial elegance, it helps me put my game face on so I can impress them with that. Detailed research, you could unearth some useful nugget, but most of the information corporates put out, is naff all use to a tech, if it's even true. One of the best ones I used came off the taxi driver who took me to the place... Other than that I agree especially about trying to steer the interviewer towards questions where you are strong. They should actually be good enough to catch you at it, but that's pretty rare. Don't go mad with it with though even the dumbest on reflection will realise you asked one question and they poured out their lifestory and then thanked you for listening. :p Try to follow every answer you give with a question of your own. After all good questions are as revealing as good answers. And fior Cthulus sake remember you are the one with the tools, skills, talent and drive, they need you as much if not more than you need them. Yiou go in there cap in hand with a please favour me with job I'm desperate attitude, you'll be nervous and come across poorly, not to mention soon sorry if you are successful....

Baruch Atta
Baruch Atta

Questions for a prospective boss What is your management philosophy If you walk past a meeting and there is laughter - what do you think How do you show value in this organization What are the plans of upper management for this department Explain the organization structure How do you make decisions What do you enjoy about your job What is the communications plan What are your day-to-day responsibilities What is the long term outlook for this job What is the company policy on training and seminars What is the decision making aspects of this job Describe an ideal employee Describe how performance reviews are conducted and received What happened to the last person on this job What is the turnover in this job, department and company Why do you release/file employees What are the challenges of this job

CyberWalker2009
CyberWalker2009

This is my first post! Hello to everyone! Please overlook any mistakes, or syntax errors, English is not my mother-language. :-) I didn't get any wiser by reading this article... On the contrary, PhilippeV's comment was really nice and well-put!!! Thumbs-up PhilippeV! :-) The article only states the obvious and the writer says exactly what the candidates would like to hear. From my experience, all these suggestions are true but can't be taken seriously nowdays as they've become 'common base' for both parties of the interview. And one more thing... the article only says that it's better for you to dress in a fine way only if you DO know how to do it, because if you can't support what you ARE you will look 'fake'. The people that disagree with this point are the ones that seem to be able to support an elegant outfit, and the ones that agree are all the rest. Both group comments and thoughts are correct when seen from each one's point of view and the article does not manage to state anything innovative, sly or longheaded here. To moderate and full of cliche! Sorry! Now, one last thing... just to chill out the tension... If I were to hire a candidate I would select some lady, not a guy, and most probably one who wouldn't know how to dress up... In fact, the less she knew to wear, the better! :-p

delta47
delta47

Some interviewers assess how you answer simple questions - whether you answer with a load of bull and spice and flair that they don't need or you answer with a simple "YES" or "NO"...Right? (please answer YES or NO ((joke!)) :D

dhays
dhays

If you didn't want the job, then why are you there? I have always dressed up. It would be wise to not overdress--the $1000 Italian suit for a job that the workers wear blue jeans and a t-shirt, maybe the work casual with a tie, or for a job such as mine where a suit is worn on occasion, then a nice suit would be fine. I never did much research on a company, that sound like a good idea. When you are trying to get rehired by a company that laid you off in another area of the country, then it is not as hard to know what the company does. Giving an impression you want the job is good as well, when I was at a place that was closing, there were options to stay with the company in other locations and one location I was being interviewed for was in Massachussetts, where the cost of living is high, I could not figure out how I could afford to go there and in the interview it showed. I ended up in Oklahoma instead, which wasn't a bad choice either as it brought us back close to family. (most are in Kansas).

jorglct
jorglct

i liked that article!

attaalib
attaalib

As far as issue 2, I dont think thats whats being implied at all. It simply means that JUST BECAUSE, you look nice in a sharp suit, flowery speech and "Perky" attitude, doesnt mean you know what your doing, what you're talking about, or that you arwe the best candidate. Stay focused, dress reasonable according to, as I read one time, according to the environment of the job; wear what you would wear on a day on the job. Or at least dont over dress, it will give the impression you're high-maintenance and maybe you'll ask for more that what the employer is willing to pay, or under dress where you dont look like you'll tke the job seriously....play the middle dress/casual blackened shoes, dark socks, no ring around the collar, "splash" of cologne, cant stress that enough, ez on the make up, etc

manish_grover
manish_grover

Great tips. Simple and to the point. I think some of us went overboard while reacting. We need to dress up. That's expected. I think what the article meant was that it cannot be a differentiator. Everyone does it. The principle was to be yourself and rely on your preparation and skills to sell yourself. About telling them that you want the job: That's not literal either. This is reflected through your research on the company, your linking back of the job requirements to your skills and experience, and telling the interviewer how you are a real good fit, and that you will keep this position as top priority if it comes through. It is also reflected by you following up immediately after and re-emphasizing your fit.

trgeorge
trgeorge

is such cr@p. I'm sick of interviewers and interviewees pulling each other's chains and asking cookie cutter questions you get off a website. I'm interviewing right now and most people now ask behavioral questions they have pulled off a website. Here's an idea: how about we sit down and talk to each other like human beings, you find out about my background and I find out about the job and we'll see if it's a right fit. "What's the biggest challenges facing your company?" -- Hiring Manager's appropriate response but would never say: I know you read that off a website ask something to ask. My challenge right now is filling this role.

BillM777
BillM777

Sometimes a company, or their interviewing-panel, will not give you the full picture even with prompting. If your goals are specific, as in wanting financial support for going to school, more vacation, or other employee benefits, ask those questions clearly and then document them. Understand what both sides are agreeing to and make it a written contract. Otherwise, over promised or generic offers will undoubtedly get lost or forgotten after the interview process is done.

settle.g
settle.g

THE most important point from this article is #8, Don't Be Needy. If the interviewer gets wind of you're really *needing* the job then all the cards are his/hers. If you can't walk away from the deal then you're in "deep weeds" shall we say.

dmcgovern
dmcgovern

5. Get your interviewer to reveal what a ???good fit??? means to them. Your objective is to find out how you might uniquely enhance this company. Example: ???How would you describe your employees and the culture of this organization???? could you give more examples of this and the other questions, this is an excellent article

Englebert
Englebert

The ultimate goal of the Hiring Manager is to hire the BEST person for the job. Not the person who most WANTS the job.

FTAdmin
FTAdmin

I've heard of this before: Someone gets the HR contact's email address after sending a resume, and then adds it to a spam list. Now the HR contact has that person's resume and four or five spam messages per day. I don't know the nature of the spam, but I can't imagine it's a good idea anyhow. If anything it shows insincerity. Another potential issue comes to mind related to the spam. Failing to use BCC, so that everyone gets to see all address. For one, that's just rude. For another, it divulges everywhere you are seeking employment, which may not be such a hot idea--especially if there are addresses for rivaling companies on the list.

ron
ron

"Don???t try to impress them with your dress, attitude, or speech." What are you implying here? No suit? It sounds like anyone with a "so so" attitude wearing jeans and a t-shirt talking belligerent is ok? I realize my example is extreme but I think you need to elaborate a bit more on item 2.

OCamp
OCamp

It does seem to me that people with common names, like "Jim Baker", more often end up in HR and on interview teams. Maybe HR has been on to this for some time -- they had the Who's Who, reverse Yellow Pages, etc.

Tony Hopkinson
Tony Hopkinson

they wont offer you the job and it almost certainly would have turned out that you didn't want it anyway.... ? How strong is the blame culture here? ? Am I expected to work with the guy with the swastika tattooed on his forehead. ? The three people I walked past on the way in were all on Dice, is there something you need to tell me.... The questions they don't want to answer are the ones you really need to ask.

JaneHawkins
JaneHawkins

So what did the taxi driver tell you?

dogstar422
dogstar422

I have always heard the rule of you dress for the interview one step above what you would wear working there. Wear Dockers and a dress shirt at work, tie and sport coat to the interview, etc.

mpukey
mpukey

"About telling them that you want the job: That's not literal either." I would say it IS literal. When I interview someone, I like to hear them say that they are interested in the job and they would like to work at my company. It shows that they were paying attention to our conversation and they liked what they heard. I would rather take a chance on a 'good' candidate who wants to be in my company than a 'great' one that seems like they'll get bored and move on in a short time.

Professor8
Professor8

"how about we sit down and talk to each other like human beings, you find out about my background and I find out about the job and we'll see if it's a right fit." Yes! I know it would be a radical change from the status quo, but the status quo is nuts.

csammann
csammann

A job seeker I was working with several years ago moved across the country in anticipation of a job that he had presumably cinched via a telephone interview. As it turned out, the interviewer had only acknowledged that the candidate was among several being considered and disavowed that the job had actually been offered. If you are offered a job, get it in writing - on formal letterhead - and make sure all parameters (salary/benefits/start date/training requisites/education support/non-standard extras) are clarified.

attaalib
attaalib

Needy means you may be Low-balled as far as salary, or not given the full "package" It is speculation, but it's something to consider. The same way an employer will not stress his dire need to fill that spot, because they have a crisis on hand from therecent vacancy, and his butt MIGHT be on the lione of he dopesnt fill that position.....YESTERDAY! He will NEVER let you know that, so you should conceal your need as well. That doesnt mean you shouldnt ASK after the interview, So, did I get the job?" Nothing wrong with that, just dont BEG for it; "Look, I really need this job", "I would really really like to work here.". I hope you will hire me." We dont beg, we search, inquire, and decide.

info
info

In my experience from both sides, if an employer senses 'neediness' from the jobseeker (or finds out from other ways, like a credit check), they almost always cross that person off their list for future consideration. This may exclude a lot of worthy people, but they still do it for some reason.

info
info

There is a LOT of miscommunication on this, but there are also a lot of people that interview for a job just so they can show up and get a paycheck by doing the minimum they can to get by. Or less.

OakvilleMyKey
OakvilleMyKey

Thanks. Luckily I read this just in time. I was about to put them on "the list". What the hell does that even mean??? Please send me the link to the newly-updated spam list so I don't accidentally put HR on it.

dallas_dc
dallas_dc

I have no clue what you are talking about. Are you trying to get back at them for not hiring you? Are you sending them follow up e-mails every day to check on your status? (not a good idea - see #8) Why would you copy anyone other than the HR person and the hring manager? I am missing something here.

sbmknight
sbmknight

the key phrase is "try to impress..." Don't try to come off as something you're not, and don't try to fake being something more than you are. Don't use words unless you are 100% sure of what they mean and that you're using them correctly. I Remember a post about the fellow who claimed to be an expert on "C-Pound," thinking that would impress the interviewer. It sure did...

randallizm
randallizm

You are kidding right? If you wear a three piece suit and never usually wear one, you will not fool an employer. You wear business casual and you are usually in jeans and a T-shirt, you will stick out that way as well. Impressing someone with things that are not your normal attitude plays out false as well. You will not win any contests for interview scores, as if you were an Olympic hopeful. You will not get anywhere from swallowing a dictionary and if your facts are wrong you will really hurt your chances of even keeping their attention, your interview is over from that point on and you will just be sitting there with the employer looking for a gracious time to tell you thank you so you may leave. These things may be hard to understand, however ask yourself what you want to see from a candidate you already think may be faking it before an interview, then sell yourself, but sell yourself correctly.

Tony Hopkinson
Tony Hopkinson

to some near by green belt (usually protected from development). Big local hooraw about it, extra jobs, convervation, green ness etc.. Wasn't on their corporate web site, so I looked good on that front. Didn't get the job mind...

Tony Hopkinson
Tony Hopkinson

Wasn't a great candidate if you aren't offering something they can't keep being great with, that will be one of the things they are looking for. Lack of interest in your role is a fault with the role (or the way you chose candidates for it), more than a fault in the candidate.

Kev Baylis
Kev Baylis

Most interviewers are normal human beings and like the rest of us, avoid rejection. After the interview whether they are recommending someone or making the final decision, selecting a candidate means putting some skin in the game. A practice I have found effective - when I am genuinely interested in a role - is, in my last contact with the interviewer, to tell them that if I was offered the job I would accept it. The important thing is to get the offer, once they have brought into you, you can negotiate around salary and package.

Professor8
Professor8

Sounds to me like a case of someone adding the HR clone to his address book, and shortly after he gets attacked by malware, which harvests his address book, and sends out spam with his e-mail address as the source. I've got an acquaintance who, once in a great while, gets messages from a dozen people, asking him why he spammed them, when, of course, he didn't. Someone else is merely using his e-mail address to spoof the source.

oldbaritone
oldbaritone

"Look decent" is a relative term, as in "decent compared to what?" Rare would be the company that would hire a programmer in stained blue jeans and a Skoal tee-shirt with holes, even though the programmer's skills are truly superb. Companies aren't looking for headaches. "Thanks for coming in. We'll let you know." (yeah, right) Likewise, a tailored Armani suit may be a little over-the-top, and may get you labeled "too rich for our blood" before the interview starts. "Next..." Really this comes down to "impeccable research" from #1 - what is the corporate culture at the prospective employer, and how are people in that job expected to dress? Match THEIR image, and if that thought makes you uncomfortable, re-evaluate your own desire to interview. If you know you don't fit well into their culture, you probably won't be happy. Do everyone a favor and save yourself the headaches. A rule-of-thumb is to dress like your (prospective) manager is expected to dress. You'll both feel more comfortable if you are dressed similarly. And you will also meet the expectations of the HR folks as you come in the door. But it comes back to #1 research - find out what the expectations are, as part of your research on the company. Then meet those expectations as a prospective employee.

BobRouseAtl
BobRouseAtl

Wearing a suit to an interview is not always appropriate. My current job is very tech-heavy, and I knew the work atmosphere was very casual. Wearing a suit might have actually alienated the people interviewing me. Instead, I wore business casual, plus a tie. After the interview, they suggested we all go to lunch, and I took the tie off. By not coming across as a "professional interviewee", I connected with the engineers interviewing me, and they gave me a glowing recommendation. If I had come in wearing a 3-piece suit, they may have wondered if I was there for a salesperson job. I've since helped interview others for our team, and I can tell you that dressing up doesn't help at all. You need to be able to discuss your tech skills, and come across as someone who will "fit in" with the team. Looking (and acting) like a prima donna will not help.

jacobus57
jacobus57

What you say makes little sense. The norm--unless it changed last week when I wasn't looking--has always been to dress UP. It is respectful, professional, and demonstrates that one has the ability to move in the highest echelon of the corporate environment. I happen to write and speak like a university professor and I dress in a suit (which I never otherwise wear) for interviews. I use big words and complex construction. I cannot dumb down my resume, cover letter, or speech, and frankly would rather know right out of the gate if my hiring manager is threatened by someone who is well-spoken and respectfully dressed. I guess we truly are moving to a lowest common denominator world.

trgeorge
trgeorge

I don't EVER wear a suite. EVER. However, I do wear them when interviewing. The article and your lame cookie cutter response are contradictory.

dallas_dc
dallas_dc

Yeah - I always hate it when they ask me stuff you have to memorize when taking a certification test, and every time you need that info, you look it up on the Internet. Meanwhile the guy with no experience, but just took the certification test the day before, gets hired. HR ends up wondering why he doesn't know anything about real day to day issues.

Professor8
Professor8

The 3-piece suit is derived from hunting clothes. It was designed to be comfortable in England, but not in Miami or San Diego or Houston. The tux, however, was a prank, making formal wear more casual. Things change. I really miss interviews at which I got a chance to "discuss my tech skills", swap war stories with colleagues, talk about the work and what we've accomplished and what we hope to accomplish, professional ethics issues, tools and toys of the job, killer apps, etc. And there has been some scamming, where they abuse the interviewee as an unpaid consultant for the day to solve current problems. We almost always wore dress shirts and a tie (even if it was with jeans from time to time), because you never knew when the VP of a multi-billion dollar firm considering a tens of millions purchase would be in the building for a meeting, or when we might have to go to them. But there were exceptions. I remember a brilliant contract completion presentation at a NASA research center by a guy wearing holey, grease-stained jeans and T-shirt who looked like he'd been pulled out of the swamp that morning (while the suit with him was totally worthless). We gave him a standing ovation. These days, a lot of interviews seem to fall into categories like "trivial pursuit", "have you memorized every line of the standard", "can you emulate a compiler" (vs. can you design and write elegant software to get the job done), "let's grill the guy and make him sweat just for the entertainment value", or even "we're just going through the motions to meet government/company policy to interview at least 5 people but we really already know who we want to hire", or "we got 30K applicants got this week (every week) so we need to fabricate lots of pretexts to whittle the pack down to the 1 or 2 we really need/want to hire" kinds of gauntlets.

jacobus57
jacobus57

I may speak and write like a professor, and I may wear a "suite" (I prefer the sofa/wingback look;-)) but I am tattooed and much prefer jeans and t-shirts. This walking contradiction would fit right in at your shop!

melbert09
melbert09

I always find it funny when I am hiring that I tell the recruiter that the candidate specifically DOES NOT NEED TO BE SUITED AND BOOTED that they tell the candidate to wear a suite. The candidate shows up in a suit because they told them to. They think that this will impress me, NO IT DOES NOT. I find peoples ability and attitude a bit more impressive than what they wear. Tattoo's and piercings welcome as well in this corporate company.

GreenPirogue
GreenPirogue

The point was that you should not adjust your words or dress significantly during the interview. If you look uncomfortable in clothes you are not used to wearing or misuse words because you are talking up, then it shows. But if you naturally use bigger words and more complex sentences, you are still being authentic to yourself, which will show during the interview. No dumbing down required.

smithsh1138
smithsh1138

I used to be a rep for a headhunter - standard instructions to candidates were, navy suit, black or navy socks (you'd be amazed at how many people will wear white-socks with a suit) black shoes (oh, yes, had to specify shoes too!) subtle tie, etc. That's changed a bit, now, since biz cas, to button-down & tie with pressed Dockers, etc. Always the same for women, though - subtle colors, easy on the makeup, low key hair, jewelry, nails, and heels. It DOES make a difference ladies. And can I state the obvious - cover the tattoos & piercings (or remove, if possible) UNLESS you're going for a rad bartender/piercing clinic/music industry etc. type of position.

jb232
jb232

I've always been taught to dress one step up from the normal accepted dress requirements for the job you are interviewing for. For example: if the normal dress in the office is slacks and a polo, wear slacks, a nice long sleeve button down shirt and a neutral tie. Its a way of showing respect without showing desperation by trying to overimpress when interviewing. Of course it really depends on the person (or panel in some cases) conducting the interview and what they are looking for.

attaalib
attaalib

I think that in YOUR case, your profession would demand a certain type of appearance; a college professor would be "expected" to "dress UP", and one with a resume in the same profession, mandates that his vernacular matches as well. I think the general road to travel is not too far up, and business-casual is the safest way, IMHO. I think its relative. I also agree that if you are jeans and Ts, and put on a suit, it WILL show, because we tend to look comfortable in the clothes we wear most, as they reflect some of our personality........again IMHO

jmathewo
jmathewo

Propane and propane accessories.

Trentski
Trentski

Sooot is meant to sound like sweet? Sooot isn't even a word. Anyway if you don't wear a suit to an interview, you pretty much aren't going to get the job

sonoftsadik
sonoftsadik

I wear a Presidential Suite just to show off my high class.

Tony Hopkinson
Tony Hopkinson

I spent a good deal of money on it, may be a US thing, but you turn up in the UK in casual, that will be interpreted as being casual... Besides we are trying to pretend to be someone we are not, bound to be aren't we as don't have a clue as to who we need to pretend to be, to be an acceptable candidate.... For every recomendation to turn up casual comfortable there's one to go dressed up. Some one expecting casual will forgive you for dressing up, teh other way round, not a chance. Don't ditch the suit, ditch uncomfortable in it, get one tailored and wear the thing.

Too Old For IT
Too Old For IT

I much prefer upscale upholstered chairs around a empty space in the middle. No table = no room to put the "list of questions we have to ask every candidate".

GreenPirogue
GreenPirogue

I thought randallizm's response seemed reasonable. Don't pretend to be something you are not. You misspell common words, attribute emotional adjectives to make your point. If you don't look comfortable in a suit, the interviewer will know it. And it will color their opinion of you as a potential applicant. Who wants to hire someone who is pretending to be someone they are not?

GreenPirogue
GreenPirogue

I prefer sofa, chair and ottoman. It shows variability without revealing too much (loveseat would be a bit too intimate for an interview).

smithsh1138
smithsh1138

God, I LOVE your sense of humor... too little of it out there, sometimes! Rock on in your 'suite'!

CCCharles
CCCharles

I like to wear a 3 piece suite. Sofa and matching arm chairs. I know I'm going to be comfortable during the interview ;-)

dhays
dhays

I agree, I wonder if it were a bedroom suite or a living room suite. There is a sign along a city street here in OKC that says they will build to suite, I wonder what they mean. (I am guessing the same problem as trgeorge had, they used the wrong word. I guess the confusion comes from that sometimes they are pronounced the same (sooot vs sweet).

smadden2
smadden2

Umm -- I also never wear a "suite" -- I might wear a SUIT, though. Your spelling was creative.