IT Employment

Places to look for new jobs in the tech arena

The tech sector seems to be the first horse out of the gate in recovering from the recession. Here are some areas across the U.S. that are creating tech jobs.

There's good news for tech pros looking for work: While the tech industry was one of the last to be affected by the recession, it appears to be one of the first ones making a rebound. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, job opportunities for computer network, systems, and database administrators are expected to increase much faster than other occupations, by 30%, through the end of the decade. Here are a few of the initiatives expected to happen in the U.S. this year that will open up more tech jobs:

  • The tech presence is increasing enormously in the South Bay area. Over the past few months, Facebook, Google, Microsoft, and Apple have expanded operations in the South Bay area. Also, Dell is expanding its presence in Santa Clara, California, and is expected to create hundreds of new jobs for tech professionals. Just months after setting up shop in Silicon Valley, Dell said it was ready to expand into a second building in the South Bay, hoping to add as many as 850 employees this year.
  • There's a new government contract to support Wright-Patterson Air Force Base in Ohio that will help create several hundred new jobs for people with computer technology experience.
  • This one is surprising: Detroit, which suffered so badly in the recession, is beginning several research and development projects in the high tech and automotive sectors. Detroit has a high rate of engineering graduates that has helped the state become the fastest-growing in the country for high tech-related jobs.
  • Wyoming has doubled the funding that's available to certain types of high tech and computer research development companies, which will bring more jobs to the state and help boost tax revenues.
  • Facebook, looking to build a large engineering presence outside its West Coast office, said it would be hiring thousands of new workers next year in the New York City area.
  • In 2014, the global communications and information technology company Harris Corporation will create a $100-million high-tech center on Florida's Space Coast and will be looking to fill at least 100 engineering positions.

About

Toni Bowers is Managing Editor of TechRepublic and is the award-winning blogger of the Career Management blog. She has edited newsletters, books, and web sites pertaining to software, IT career, and IT management issues.

8 comments
Professor8
Professor8

But how many of them are REAL jobs vs. bodyshop gigs? And you've reminded me of the need for tips on how to root out contact info for hiring managers and avoid unthinking "candidate management system" manipulators.

VJMcDonald
VJMcDonald

Just goes to show ya: even hi-tech types, whom you'd think might be a little more cosmopolitan, get geo-centrically comfortable and set in their ways. I'm imagine everyone who lives in California knows what Toni means when she mentions "the South Bay area." It so happens I live in the Tampa Bay (Florida) area, but I don't use the term "bay area" much less "south bay" with people who are not familiar with Florida. And, yes, I know where Silicon Valley is, but that doesn't make such an "insider" reference palatable. Talk about "ugly American"-- is there such a thing as an "ugly Californian"? (And you know I am not talking about physical appearance!)

Datadad
Datadad

@mserrano: It would definitely behoove you to do at least cursory research on longstanding, much discussed subjects before shooting yourself in the foot with your own mouth. Toni: Thanks for pointing out where we're seeing some small sparks of a fledgling recovery. Hopefully the CIO's will be able to consistently get their hands on some of the capital that's been stored under the corporate mattresses.

sermic
sermic

Funny how most of these indications, and for the most part, are never in the major east coast areas: NY, MA, NJ, etc. Given that these major east coast areas are probably the biggest users and consumers of technology, it would be interesting to hear perspectives on why the job growth here is so slow. It would also be much more meaningful if you expand on the specifics of these growth areas you mentioned. Tech job growth in one area does not necessarily mean it transfers to actual "new" jobs or "job growth" for the nation.

mkogrady
mkogrady

What would you recommend for cross training to leverage IT skills with Smart Grid and Renewable Energy. Any insights would be helpful.

Chaz Chance#
Chaz Chance#

Prof, if you have any tips on this yourself, please share them. I check the web sites of interesting companies. Many advertise jobs there, saving recruiter fees. It also pulls in more people with a genuine interest in the company. However, I got my present job through a recruiter, with a company I had never heard of, doing work that I never knew I would enjoy so much. The old standards, still being touted here in the UK by the government and others, are: send your CV/resume on spec, and call the receptionist and ask her, and get to know someone in the company. The receptionist will put you on to HR, who will give a diplomatically encouraging reply, asking for you to send your CV/resume, which will probably be automatically binned along with the ones sent on spec. And how do you "casually" get to know someone in a company in another city, or further away? That's without considering the morals of using someone that way. Perhaps "how to get your resume to the right person" could be another topic in the already comprehensive list of similar subject from you Toni? Or maybe TR members could have a forum where they post the contacts within their own companies?

WorkflowGuru
WorkflowGuru

Toni: thanks for the update! Always nice to hear where the activity is. VJ: the subject of your comment reminds me of the different references to a rolling stop based on who and where you are. Outside of CA, it's a "California Stop". In CA, it's a "Hollywood Stop". I moved away too long ago to know what it's called in Hollywood! If trying to complete the "ugly ___" phrase appropriately in this context, you might as well go all the way: "ugly human" :-) And, no, this doesn't apply to Toni.

Professor8
Professor8

I highly recommend trying to get an honest job, instead. One that does not involve massive privacy violation schemes.

Editor's Picks