IT Employment

Poll: Do you work more than 40 hours per week?

It's no surprise that workloads are increasing and employees are working longer hours. We'd like to get a sampling of our audience to see how many of you are working more than 40 hours per week.

It's no surprise that workloads are increasing and employees are working longer hours. We'd like to get a sampling of our audience to see how many of you are working more than 40 hours per week.

About

Toni Bowers is Managing Editor of TechRepublic and is the award-winning blogger of the Career Management blog. She has edited newsletters, books, and web sites pertaining to software, IT career, and IT management issues.

78 comments
unhappyuser
unhappyuser

42 to 47 hours per week for work but I also have a weekend job, volunteer on a farm one afternoon a week and hold an elected postition. These others add five to 15 hours per week. I could put in another 10 to 20 hours per week doing IT stuff on the side but I am punished enough at work. EMD

B Monarch
B Monarch

Very sad but true - Aussies, though culturally sold as a lazy bunch (it's all image!), are EXPECTED to work between 10-30 extra hours a week and there is no way we get paid overtime! If you walk out the door at 5pm you look like you're ripping off the company! And what's more - Australian managers have no concept whatsoever of remote working - you'd think being the biggest island(!) in the world we'd be first off the mark encouraging staff to work from home or hot offices closer to the regional areas - but no, we travel anywhere upwards of 1.5, 2, 3 hours each way everday some of us to work our 10-12 hour days - NO LIFE!!!!

Buzz1701
Buzz1701

My basic is 45 hours per week! Usually do 55+!

Craigcts
Craigcts

Many/ most people here in IT do not work anymore hours than 40 but in my position I regularly do

C
C

It sounds to me like management is taking advantage of us.

Justin James
Justin James

I've got a full time job. While my time is quite flexible (I work from home), it has its ups and downs. Some weeks I'll easily put in 60 hours, other weeks I'll be twiddling my thumbs for much of the time. On top of that, I write for TechRepublic; while per "per week" actually writing articles is fairly low, the amount of time I spend keeping abreast of the industry in order to find new topics to write about, product a twice-monthly news piece, and such is quite high. On top of that, there is the need (in my mind) to respond to any commenter who asks a question, makes a valid point, etc. On top of all of this, I have been working very hard to start my own company, and we have a product that is really coming together quite nicely. There is literally not a day in the week that I am not working. Most days I work for about 4 hours, go to the gym, put in a few more hours, do dinner, get my son to bed, maybe watch 1 TV program off the DVR, and then work until 1 - 2 AM, then read for a bit. People tell me I need to "take it easy" and "enjoy life". They don't understand that I need to work like this so that in the future, I will be able to do that without jeopardizing my family's financial stability. One day I'll be there, but not today. J.Ja

kkieper
kkieper

My experience has been that no matter how early you arrive at work (I get in before 6AM and stay until 4PM 5 days a week) there is no recognition unless you stay well past the quiting time and even then managers are reluctant to "reward" a salaried person.

cynic 53
cynic 53

I am paid for 37.5 hours a week and I work hard in those hours. Very,very occasionally I will work longer by agreement and am paid overtime if I do so but I would rather have the leisure "me" time than do this unless it is absolutely vital to complete some work where others may be waiting for my input or if for example someone else is taken sick or is off on holiday. I am not however a rigid clockwatcher who closes down his PC at the end of a shift and do not mind spending a few minutes say 10 to 15 to bring something to a sensible point before closing down for the day. These extra minutes here and there I do not claim for payment. I have found from bitter experience that if one does a large amount of additional unpaid work not only is no thanks given in most cases but it becomes expected and more work is loaded on as "Fred will always stay on and do it!" Also if you do a lot of unpaid work you may well be keeping someone else out of a job who is unemployed. Stakhanovites belong in the history of Soviet Russia and not in the modern workplace.

rastogi.rishi
rastogi.rishi

The way IT industry has shaped, specially in India, working more than 40 hours is treated as normal and expected. Not many organizations "really" care about the work life balance. There are still organizations where people work 6 days a week. Though a need to stretch a little at times is ok and expected but if this becomes a regular feature then it starts taking its toll on ones personal life. Global clients, cross time zone calls and the manage it "All" adds to the need to work more than 40 hrs. a week.

jck
jck

Used to be (way back when), businesses paid people a salary so that there was no incurred overtime expense and the employee could be flexed more. In the modern workplace, salary "exempt" employees are a way to maximize profitability and minimize/fix cost. Like where I work: Before I started here as a salary-exempt staff member, I got promised by the boss that I could have a flex schedule, as long as I did my work and put in my hours. Within a year, that was all negated. I had a regimented schedule, even if I was on "lunch" and got calls or visitors I was expected to give them my attention, etc. Although HR would say "you should take your lunch", the work environment dictates not having any paid breaks that you are guaranteed to relax. Even when I'd go outside, co-workers would talk work to me or ask for my help (and the help of others in our department). It would be different if I could walk to a park, or walk somewhere to eat for lunch and get away. But being that the nearest place for food is 2 miles and the nearest decent restaurant is 10 miles, taking a 30 minute lunch means not getting away at all. I do overtime every week, except when I have multiple medical appointments. Then, I'm still expected to try and put in a full 40 even if it means being here past business hours. Gotta love 42-46 hour weeks.

llanning
llanning

I work in a salaried, overtime exempt, NON MANAGMENT, union position in IT for Public Schools in CALIFORNIA!!! NOW THAT IS OVERTIME - always has been, always will be. Its the love of a challenge in this underfunded but creative and unique enterprise.

The 'G-Man.'
The 'G-Man.'

Paid a salary and get no overtime. No paid overtime means no overtime.

GizmoGirl
GizmoGirl

I'm in IT programming & supporting upgrades and application integration. I work remotely. I am "salaried" so going past 40 hrs doesn't matter to employers. The "office" phone is forwarded to my home phone. 40 hrs/week...are you kidding? It's never less than 50. I'm not complaining, I like my job (& am glad to have one) & lack of commute, but in this field it's pretty much expected.

yattwood
yattwood

1. I am a DBA, 'nuff said 2. During the move of a group of systems to a new data center, me and the _only_ other remaining DBA (everyone else being let go or transferred) worked a MINIMUM of 90 hours/week - supposedly the _outsourcer's_ DBA's are to take over "operational" responsibilites and I and the other DBA are to focus on "applications work" hmmm....I still need _ALL_ of my AIX/HP-UX/Solaris/Windows/Oracle/SQL Server/etc skills in this New World Order, because: a. My users, being one floor down, for some reason, PREFER to talk to me as opposed to people 12 hours and thousands of miles away that are rather hard to understand b. The people 12 hours and thousands of miles away have not supported the systems for THE LAST TWELVE YEARS AS I HAVE, so they, how can I put this - DON'T KNOW AS MUCH ABOUT THE SYSTEMS AS I AND THE OTHER DBA DO, wonder of wonders! 3. They don't call it a 'CrackBerry' for nothing.......

rwagoner
rwagoner

I think a better survey would be, how many hours do you work? A: Part Time B: 40 hours/week C: 41-50 hours/week D: 51-60 hours/week E: 61+ hours/week

HAL 9000
HAL 9000

It's lucky if I get the see the Wife let alone her kids. OH wait a minute what do you mean it's now 2010? God her kids are now in their mid 30's what happened and where did 1989 go to? Col

NickNielsen
NickNielsen

Some weeks, I'll have enough calls to make two weeks' work. Other weeks, I won't have enough calls to make 10 hours work. The call load is consistent enough most of the time that proper planning allows me to bring the week in at 40-42 hours.

Daniel Breslauer
Daniel Breslauer

8.5 hours per day, times 5 days, comes to 42.5 hours per week.

john.a.wills
john.a.wills

because after about 40 hours per week people are merely present at the work site, not doing really productive work: they're too tired, or perhaps they go easy during the first 40, so a smart employer makes the standard working week 40 hours and gets good work during those 40.

hvrobinson
hvrobinson

My habit of work is to show up an hour or so early to clear out the overnight fires. THEN do my 8 to 9 hours. Then I get to stamp out the daily emergencies, personnel issues, budgets and other things that you can't do while being interrupted. The cell phone (electronic leash) is on 24/7/365, and if you add it all up it is easily 65 hours a week. For this... my job was outsourced to Mexico for $4.00 an hour, and I've been out of work for over two years. Seems like something's wrong with the world, not with me.

Sterling chip Camden
Sterling chip Camden

Yes, management often takes advantage of workers. No to unions. We're not talking about a job that anyone can do, so instead of insisting that everyone be treated the same, make yourself more competitive, and then you can tell your abusive relationship goodbye.

HAL 9000
HAL 9000

Speaking from my experience that Day never comes. The hardest bit of my life was not the 100 + hour weeks as well as keeping up to date with developing technology but a 18 month stink of being stuck in a Hospital flat on my back unable to move or do anything. It was positively painful and I was going crazy after the first week or so. When you work like crazy at the beginning it becomes expected by the worst person possible [b]You.[/b] It's something you never grow out of in my somewhat limited experience either. ;) Col

KarrasB
KarrasB

Thank you for sharing that last paragraph. Very important message...especially for the young and eager to please crowd.

yattwood
yattwood

Greetings, cynic53, Ah, it is not often outside the writings of Aleksandr Isayevich Solzhenitsyn that I find someone referring to 'Stakhanovites'! And so the zeks of the gulags were - unwilling, starved and forced to work unceasingly under savage conditions... The Stakhanovite Movement was propaganda - a carrot held out to the ordinary Soviet worker, a carrot he or she was destined to never taste....

KarrasB
KarrasB

What did happen to 1989?

Papa_Bill
Papa_Bill

(Private Electronics School) for a year I had the following week: 5 four hour morning classes 5 four hour afternoon classes 3 four hour evening classes 2 four hour evening classes (State Junior College) Fun, Fun, Fun! 60 hours/week Straight pay, non union! Well, I sure felt employable

Papa_Bill
Papa_Bill

Then it shouldn't count. Are you paid to eat lunch?

KarrasB
KarrasB

Absolutely. Being a business owner, or an artist for that matter, means working whenever it's called for, however long it takes.

gonzalez.peter
gonzalez.peter

I am in the same boat...I work an 8 hour day for a fortune 500 company and another 8-10 hours for my consulting company. Eight hours a day is a day off for me :)

Osiyo53
Osiyo53

That somewhere along the line someone probably told you that, or you read it somewhere, and it seemed quite reasonable to you. And for some people it may even be true. Especially if they are poorly self motivated, their overall physical fitness level is not all that good, etc. But I've got news for you. In my lifetime I've known a great many people, quite literally thousands, who'd consider a 40 hour work week as a nice, easy week. Almost like a little mini-vacation. Years before I ever graduated High School, I was going to school and holding down a job. It was supposed to have been a part time job after school, 20 hours a week. But I don't recall any week in which I was not working at least 30 hours. On top of going to school, doing homework, etc. After graduation from High School, I decided to attend a program that was part private trade school, part college work. In order to get an Associates Degree. During that time I went to school, did the required homework (and there was lots of it), and held down a full time job that usually consisted of a 50 to 60 hours work week. BTW, I did HAVE to work that extra time over 40. It was voluntary, and I got paid for it. But the school tuition and fees were stiff. And I was from a poor family who were unable to help me. In fact, I was giving my parents part of my wages to help them make ends meet. And to help my siblings eat a little better and have a few extras in life than they would otherwise have had without my help. Later I joined the U.S. Navy. And became a Black Shoe Snipe (engine room gang). Ended up spending a 23 year career in the Navy. Most of it assigned to front line combat ships, mostly aircraft carriers or one of their escorts. Discounting the time spent during 3 tours assigned to Riverine Patrol Boats in Nam. For a Snipe assigned on a deployed front line combat vessel, a 12 hour work day was an easy day. 16 to 18 hour days were common. Throw in some regularly occurring periods when one went from 24 to 48 hours at a stretch due to emergency repairs, special operations, or whatever. And those work days were 7 days a week when under way. With maybe a once or twice a month "Holiday Routine" declared on a Sunday. Holiday Routine meant yah did not have to do anything but stand your watches. As most Snipes at the time stood 4 and 8 (4 hours on watch, 8 hours off, you might only have an 8 hour day that day. Pure friggin luxury. I remember such days with fondness and pleasure. To be fair, when a combat vessel was back at home port, off deployment, we generally had regular 40 hour work weeks. Discounting extra time spent aboard if one had the Duty Day. Which was once every 3 to 5 days, depending on your division. If you had The Duty, you stayed on board after everyone else left for the day. For me, as a Snipe, the Navy assigned me to "Sea Duty" for 5 years at a time. Then would give me a break and give me a 2 or 3 year assignment to some sort of Shore Duty. On shore duty they tried to keep your work week down to 40 or 50 hours. But it depended on your precise assignment. On one such shore duty assignment I never saw less than 60 hours a week. But I took that assignment voluntarily. Not only because the assignment interested me but also because it the particular job I accepted meant additional points being awarded towards my getting a promotion. As it was considered "Arduous Duty". In this case it meant not only longer work weeks, but on several occasions folks were trying their best to do me bodily harm. And I was doing my best to see that they failed in that goal. In another shore duty assignment I was an instructor. Regular hours for Navy schools were 40 hours a week. I probably spent from 10 to 20 additional hours per week doing things like curriculum development and review, student review and grading, etc. Toss in self directed study to improve my own knowledge in the subjects I was teaching. When I retired from active duty with the Navy I went to work for one of the major telecoms. I was somewhat timid and worried when I started that civilian job. Keeping in mind that for 23 years I'd had minimal contact with civilians except for social occasions. Was kinda wondering (and worrying) about how I'd shape up and compare. LOL ... I worked for them for 10 years and worked at least 50 hours, more often 60, occasionally 70 or more, per week. Maybe getting in two or three 40 hour weeks in a year's time. And thought, "What a piece of cake ! Just how easy can a job get?" I was paid for every bit of the over time. And most of the work was during the 5 days of the work week. Which meant I had almost all of the weekends off. Plus vacation time, etc. Oh, there were some long days. Besides my regular duties I was called upon for emergency response situations as a member of a special emergency response team. What they called Priority One situations. Primarily meant a major switch house had failed or was in imminent danger of failure. Meaning one dropped anything else not a Pri One and came running. And you were authorized, and expected, to do whatever it took to get the switch back on line or keep it from playing dead cockroach. It was actually a pretty interesting job. I had collateral responsibilities. But my primary one was responding to those Pri One calls, which might come in from anywhere in a multi-state area. Net result, on many an occasion I might spend from 4 to 8 hours just getting to the problem area. Then jump in and work 4, 8, 12, or 24 hours straight to get things under control. More than once I was on the go for over 36 hours straight. But usually at around 36 hours, I'd take at least a 2 hour break to eat, catch 30 winks, etc. Because at that point I knew from experience that my chances of making a mistake increased drastically. Anyway, net result was that it was common for me to have 50 to 70 hours on the clock 3 or 4 days into the week. At which point, if there were no more Pri One calls, I put everything else on hold and called it good. Went home. I worked more 4 day weeks, than 5. And those 3 day long weekends were great. Nowadays, and for nearly 10 years now, I've been working for a different company. In this job, while I technically work 40 hours a week on the clock. Most weeks you can add another 10 worked "not on the clock". Sometimes more. Its just the nature of the job. This job requires one to stay on top of new equipment, developments, and methods. So its necessary to spend some times staying current with what's going one. Studying tech manuals for new devices or new revisions. Etc. Not to mention after hours work when one is tracking down a "bug", maybe in hardware, maybe in the software. You don't necessarily know, and you're working against a deadline. Most of our business is fixed bid contract work. With penalties associated with not getting systems up and running on time. So one does what one has to do. But most of my work weeks are no more than that 50 hours (10 unpaid). And I am paid well. Just about the easiest work weeks I can remember, barring the occasional and very infrequent exceptions in the past. A piece of cake. Nothing to it. Worst part of it is the occasional major headache where some custom program our programmers created for a customer isn't working just right and I'm in debugging mode. There is nothing like spending hours and hours looking at raw source code trying to ferret out the problem to drive me up a wall. Just to find the problem, and figure out that the fix takes 2 minutes. Hardware troubleshooting, OTH, is easy for me. But then, that is my specialty. They seem to be under the impression around here (where I work) that if its a hardware problem and no one else can figure it out, give the task over to me since I can't be stumped. Or so they seem to think. Chuckle ... I try my best to encourage that line of thinking on their part. It's nice to feel needed. Especially in this economy. At best, I'm an adequate programmer. Good enough to earn my pay, but nothing special. But give me a possible hardware problem, let me break out the tools, meters, scopes, and look at not only the mechanical and electronic side of things but also at the configuration, setup, firmware, how the item is being used and what is expected of it, etc and more times than not I'll provide an answer to the problem. Let's just say that manufacturer's of equipment we deal with call me for info more often than I call them. I'm on the quick dial list for several manufacturer's of the equipment we work with. Common for me to get a call from one of their tech reps or engineers asking me if I've ever run across this or that issue with their stuff that's being reported by another customer. And if so, what did I find and how did I handle it? Its not that I'm smarter than anyone else. Far from it. But I've a LOT of experience, formal training, and self education. And I'm a stubborn and persistent old fart not much given to giving up. However, it does require that I spend some time staying on top of things. On my own time. Heck, in my home I have a rather complete "test bench" set up where I can simulate with real equipment live setups and installations of the types we do. The company readily allows me to take home stuff to be tested, examined, pounded in simulations of real world utilization, etc. I consider this job pretty easy, in comparison to others I've had. Too easy. When I retired from the Navy I was 6 foot even, 165 pounds, 30 inch waist, at age 40 plus. Gained maybe 10 pounds and an inch on the waist in the 10 years after that. Now, in this job, I'm up to 195 pounds, 34 inch waist. I'm getting fat and lazy, in addition to just plain older. And by a Friday afternoon, I have to admit I'm starting to be ready for a couple days off work. Starting to drag a little. Can't figure out if its the age, or the fact that I'm getting fat and lazy from an easy job. Or a combination of the two.

rastogi.rishi
rastogi.rishi

I don't believe when people are on international calls with teams distributed across the world they are just killing time. There is work being done. Yes there are people who don't even work properly during their 40 hrs let alone beyond that.

timothyd
timothyd

Either (a) you work at an imaginary company, or (b) you are from another planet, or (c) you have some really good 'smoke'. Regardless of which answer is correct, where do I sign up?

dwdino
dwdino

That is the funniest thing I have heard this week. I can't count the number of problems solved, systems installed, fires extinguished, documents written, and "superman" moments accomplished in a single 80+ hour week. "...after 40 hours per week people are merely present at the work site..." Stop my sides are hurting... Just be thankful you have never had to really work hard.

HAL 9000
HAL 9000

If workers are getting screwed by the boss who else is going to stand up to the boss and stop them abusing their position? Col

HAL 9000
HAL 9000

[i]and then you can tell your abusive relationship goodbye.[/i] The wifes not going to let you off so easy. :D Col

Osiyo53
Osiyo53

And I thought 2 months flat on my back sucked. And I found out something I never knew before then. When they let me sit up for the first time, after 2 months totally flat, I darn near passed out. The whole world seemed to go into a crazy spin.

cmiller5400
cmiller5400

I'd go absolutely, positively, stark raving [b]MAD[/b]. Cripes, I can't even sit still in the dentist chair for the teeth cleaning. What laid you up for so long if I may ask?

maddoghall
maddoghall

I would have courses along those lines, plus marking papers and doing lesson plans....more like 80 hours a week. After 3.5 years of this I went into private industry so I could "rest".

wrmosca
wrmosca

Nobody said they counted lunch as time worked, but yeah some companies include a half hour lunch as part of an 8 hr day.

Papa_Bill
Papa_Bill

But it sounds like age to me. You enjoy your work too much for it to be anything else.

HAL 9000
HAL 9000

On and I remember this date very well 9-9-2001 I had a Mercedes fall off Jack Stands and I'm not really sure how that happened either even now But I was crushed to under 9.5 inches across the Nipple Line from side to side. When they got the car off me I was purple from the Nipples up where the blood had flown in but couldn't flow out again and started to burst Blood Vessels. I was only more than a bit worried because I couldn't breathe and I loved the way that people stopped doing what they where to hear me try to tell them to [b]Get the Bloody Thing off me![/b] :D Anyway when I got out from under the thing after all it's only 2.5 tons I was bleeding from the ears, eyes and nose so I had a smoke and watched the Meatwagon turn up. Not sure who called them but other than a few broken ribs which I knew would hurt like hell I wasn't overly concerned. Quite interesting watching the guys from the Meatwagon too, I should say they got really upset with me smoking and then proceeded to put in 6 IV Lines, then insist on picking me up and moving me onto a stretcher [i]I wanted to walk to the Meatwagon naturally[/i] and then a rushed trip to the Meatworks. It was there a couple of days latter that when waiting for a repeat of Star Trek I was watching Commercial Aircraft hit buildings and no Star Trek. What can I say it was most inconvenient of those people to do that I really wanted to watch Star Trek as I had nothing else to do and had spent the day looking forward to it. Of course the Nursing Staff insisted when the saw a repeat of the first plane that it must all be a stunt, but at least they where well informed when otherwise they would have been reading Womans Porn all night. :D Col

Justin James
Justin James

The closest I came to that, I was fixing a freeze plug on an '87 Monte Carlo SS. I had the engine unbolted from the frame and jacked way up so I could reach it. It was a brand new hydraulic jack, I had never used it before. I was underneath the car and was ready to let it down. I thought it would drop slowly so I could guide the engine in place if needed. I opened the valve and that engine came slamming down onto the suspension that had either 280k or 380k miles on it (no one was quite sure the true mileage of the vehicle) and it gently crushed me. Luckily, the suspension finally kicked it and took it off me a moment later, *and* it was lined up perfectly and ready for me to put the bolts back in. Scary as anything. J.Ja

santeewelding
santeewelding

Younger and dumber once, I figured I'd be under the truck for just a minute to get done what I had to do. No creeper. No jackstands. Alone with no assistant. Unbeknownst to me, a bleeding jack cylinder. It's moments like those when you want to at least say, "Uh-oh", but can't, for the weight on your chest.

NickNielsen
NickNielsen

No truck transmission is a lightweight. The Super 18 is a beast at over 300 kg, but those automatics come in at half a metric tonne!

HAL 9000
HAL 9000

An Apprentice doing exactly as Apprentices do and ignoring everything I told him as he knew better. :D But to make things worse in those days they didn't have NB's, Mobile Phones or Hand Held Games. I don't know how we all survived. :_| I was actually asked to help an apprentice with a Semi Gear Box. He couldn't get it in and I was passing at the time he asked for help. I got under the thing on a creeper and told him to do nothing and felt up in the darkness to see what was wrong. When I found out why he couldn't get it back together I told him how to fix the problem and he said [b]No I'll rock it in.[/b] not good when you are stuck under the thing and it falls/topples. Finding a RoadRanger Gearbox squashing your chest/pelvis was probably the worst bit or maybe the apprentice running away because he stuffed up. OK he went to get help but I don't think he needed to be away for 3 days to get it. Well it felt that long at least. :D OH it didn't do the creeper I was on any good either. :^0 Col

Sterling chip Camden
Sterling chip Camden

I, too, worked my way through college. At one time I was holding down three part-time jobs (one with a midnight to noon shift on Saturday) plus 19 hours of classes. Later (in the 80s), I put in my dues with a software company. During the ramp up to tax season, we'd often put in 80+ hour weeks -- go home after midnight, sleep four hours, and come back to work. The only difference on weekends was that we didn't have to wear a tie. Now I'm independent, and can enjoy the luxury of working only a ~50 hour week.

maddoghall
maddoghall

@The 'G-Man' I never called my students "lazy", at least not the ones that graduated. However the tuition at the state school where I taught was so low ($420 per year in 1977) and the students lived at home (so no "room and board" needed). Toss in reasonable educational loans ($1000 a year was easy to get as a student) and that money paid for tuition, books and gasoline. Quite a few students had part-time jobs, but not the long hours you worked, and some still had time for a little fun after class.

The 'G-Man.'
The 'G-Man.'

Many years ago I still needed to eat as well as study. I spent 5 years doing 7 day weeks, most starting 9 am till 4 pm at Uni then 5 pm till 12 am at work for min pay. Weekends were just an 8 till 4 at work. People still had the cheek to call me a lazy student as the time or try to pour cold water on my eventual achievement, even today. Still, it was worth it looking at the current pay packet and 36 hour week.

Papa_Bill
Papa_Bill

our payroll division called an 8 hour day. You were required by a schedule to eat a 1/2 hour lunch at 11:00 when everybody else brought us there problems. Policy said they didn't wait - work on that problem until it's fixed and on the way out the door. But you had to be back at work at 11:30. So you saved your lunch 'til tomorrow. You were not permitted to "make up" lunch time by leaving at 3:00, you had to stay until 3:30 and account for that 1/2hr. So you worked 2-1/2hrs/Wk at no pay and could not add it to vacation, sick or compensatory time. We would usually tack this onto our next OT report. OT was a minimum 2hrs or portal-to-portal. Any complaints from management went to the independent Personnel Board for hearing. They invariably sided with the employee, as the general feeling was that this "lunch hour" (as management had the nerve to call it) policy was grossly unfair.

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