IT Employment

Poll: If you had the choice, would you be in the same job in a year?

Some studies are predicting that the people who have clung to their existing jobs throughout the recession, will be eager to move on once the economy picks up.

Some job surveys have indicated that a great number of employees are sticking with their present jobs, whether they like them or not, because of the recession. And other studies are indicating that if the economy picks up and hiring increases, that these same people will stage a mass exodus for other and better job opportunities.

I thought this was an interesting topic to get your take on. Please take the poll below on what your future job plans will be if the economy picks up.

About

Toni Bowers is Managing Editor of TechRepublic and is the award-winning blogger of the Career Management blog. She has edited newsletters, books, and web sites pertaining to software, IT career, and IT management issues.

25 comments
boxfiddler
boxfiddler

But I didn't have the choice. :(

wlportwashington
wlportwashington

A year agao I would have said YES. But things are no longer rosey and happy in my firm. We hired an indivdual who has made life horrible for everyone concerned. This year alone, he laid off one person and three tended their resignations. When walking arouind I see many people with jobs sites up on their computers and others working on their resumes. I wonder when my turn is next.

litLn8
litLn8

Why do you make the No's be definite, and give the Yes's a "probably" option. These results are uninformative.

gechurch
gechurch

I'm not so sure it's a big deal. I voted "yes, probably". I'm really happy where I am, but if something better came up I would move on. But usually if people want to leave a company they are certain about it. Who would answer "no, probably not"? If you aren't happy where you are, why would you only "probably" move on? I doubt many people are unhappy where they are, but might stay if they had another offer. There would no doubt be some people who would take that option, but given that this is an informal survey of people I don't see that it makes a big difference.

Oz_Media
Oz_Media

I don't get enough versatility and challenge now. I find this role easy, and easy = boring to me. "Great, easy money" is what friends tell me, but all money seems easy to earn if you enjoy earning it. When it comes to redundancy, lack of challenge and constant personal/self testing of your skillset, I want out. Love the company, love the staff, love the clients, love the travel, love teh flexibility of hours etc. ABSOLUTELY bored silly with the task, just FAR to easy for me.

cbader
cbader

I just started my job, December will be my one year anniversary so for now Im good. My limit is typically in the three year range.

zentross
zentross

As long as I remember that the organization only cares about what I can do for them, I have to look out for building opportunities that allow me to not only take care of needs today, but build reserves for lean times and retirement. A company's retirement plan may look great, but it is only there so long as the company exists. Additionally, it serves the purpose of continuous learning to mix it up once in a while in order to not stagnate on a limited grouping of technologies, remain entrenched in one industry, or build a velvet trench where promotion and growth opportunities are lost in favor of false security.

Trs16b
Trs16b

Everyone I know is in the same boat. Management is taking advantage of the fact that there are no opportunities for people to leave. I am the CIO and I'm looking just as hard as my staff. Heck one company I know fired all of their sales staff and told the they could re-apply for the jobs at a lower commission. No they are not "circuit city". It's ugly.

yattwood
yattwood

where I work from the rush of IT people RUNNING to leave, after YEARS of 60-80 hour workweeks, ever decreasing benefits, being expected to work ALL weekend and then ALL week, upper management's _devotion_ to outsourcing EVERYTHING they possibly can and their devaluing of the skills of the in-house staff! As for me, being a 1958 Baby (yah, do the math), I will probably stay as long as I can; I do have more than 10 years in, so I can't just be shown the door without getting some kind of package.....

Oz_Media
Oz_Media

While your employer is most likely only bound to offer the basic severance pay based on time served, which does add up after the first 5 years, I doubt you will see more unless your company is in the practice of the big send off. Judging by the policies and people running away, it doesn't sound like that's the case. Probably the only "package" the boss will show you is behind his fly. On another note, 10 years in and 14 to go, you are almost halfway to walking out anyway. If you can stomach it, and can handle being a lifer, why not hang in and at least take the buggers all the way to retirement? Good luck with that, and I don't mean it sarcastically.

oschmid14
oschmid14

Most of us are hired at will. This means the organization has no obligation to provide you with a package.

aeiyor
aeiyor

I voted for the Yes, Probably. But the truth is as many have stated the current economic situation has fostered a lot of habits that leave many employee's wondering whats the incentive for putting in 110 or 150 or 200% when rewards are far and few between. I love my job, I work as a tech doing desktop, application, networking, systems support. I love the variety as I would hate being in a position that was just in front of a computer. I like the onsite calls and working directly with clients versus over a terminal to their PC. If the economy improves, there's a CHANCE the company may reinstate promotions or rewards. But if they don't... I guess greener pastures is the answer for me. I would like to retire in a company that truly "cares" for its employee's because I can most assuredly provide the loyalty. But when a company gets rid of people based on the short term of financial ease then long term hardships of recovery of knowledge, experience and know-how are later paid. Resume is up-to-date and accessible. But there are things that resumes cannot convey. Experience, work ethics, personal interactions with the work culture and environment. I don't have all the degree's to qualify me for positions, but I can learn. I don't have all the certifications out there, but are they really used to that extent that the requirement filters out great candidates?

zentross
zentross

aeiyor@, Unfortunately, managers with little personal IT experience who thereby lack the insight to interview for willingness and ability to learn will usually grade heavily on the crutch of documented proof of accomplishments. These accomplishments are going to take the form of degrees, certifications, and professional references from industry leadership. Fortunately one or two from the second and at least three from the third item will usually trump a degree unless the individual is set on a principle of status and prestige instead of getting the skills for today's needs and the ability to meet tomorrow's challenges.

science geek
science geek

I work for state government, and have seen this pattern repeatedly. The economy takes a downturn, draconian measures ensue, and when the economy turns around, IT people bolt. No matter HOW bad your CEO or CIO is, it can't be as bad as a couple of hundred politicians making the rules!

DadsPad
DadsPad

your message does not go where you think it will. :)

don.brandt
don.brandt

I am a contract employee with the US Government, so staying at the same job is contingent on the contract. With that said, I deffenitly plan on staying with the company. The company is small and new. When I was hired the company doubled in size and four years later we are at about 20 employees and still growing. So definately yes to staying with the company.

Photogenic Memory
Photogenic Memory

I like certain aspects of my job. I love working with computers. What I don't like is shitty pay, shitty management, no training, and no incentive to do better. I've had my fill so far at my current job. Yep. Time to move on.

tsmith71553
tsmith71553

I hear ya, brother ...I am in East Tennessee, where real opportunity in my professional area is few and far between, and about the only remedy is relocation ... something we have finally conceeded to ... and like you've said, it's not necessarily the job, it's a poor administration's advocation of suppressing people, ideas, and individual progression, for the sake of their own agendas. Hopefully, things will start turning around, and will once again turn from becoming an "employers' market", to one where IT people can truly prosper and be proud of what they're doing.

yvettestepan
yvettestepan

Depends if employers can match market offerings for existing employees .. maybe, maybe not.

dukegijoe
dukegijoe

I think the poll needs to be a little different. Would I stay with the company, probably. If I had a choice would I stay in the same job, probably not. See? Big Difference.

zentross
zentross

Thank you for adding the distinction.

cjcoats
cjcoats

...if you're going to have a "Yes, probably".

DadsPad
DadsPad

be considered seriously for new jobs. They know that if older people are hired, retirement will be on there minds, sooner or later. I know there are exceptions, but the rule is still there. Currenly, I really like my job and the people I work with. While there are aspects that I do not like, that is much the same everywhere.

TimH.
TimH.

Given the choice I would definately stay - I love the job, get on really well with my colleagues and the job is really close to home. Unfortunately as a contractor I know that my job is not safe - especially as the company is starting to lay people off and I know that I will probably be given notice to leave very soon.