Leadership

Reference a skills list when preparing your resume

Toni Bowers offers a keyword-friendly IT skills list that you can reference when building your resume to make sure it catches the eye of prospective employers.

In a previous blog, I suggested that you list your IT skills at the top of the resume so a prospective employer can more easily browse them and so that automatic resume screening programs will pick up the keywords.

But listing skills isn't as easy as it sounds. When faced with the question, "What are my skills?" some people go blank or just don't know how to organize them for maximum benefit. The task becomes much easier when you can see a list of IT skills and just add them as they apply to your experience.

To help you out with this, I've published such a list. There are a multitude of keyword-friendly skills on this list, divided by Hardware (server and client), applications, database, telecom, OS, web development, etc.  Take a look at the list by clicking here.

About

Toni Bowers is Managing Editor of TechRepublic and is the award-winning blogger of the Career Management blog. She has edited newsletters, books, and web sites pertaining to software, IT career, and IT management issues.

21 comments
a_ishti
a_ishti

Telecom skills can be more vast. Like - Mediation, Provisioning, etc. Last of all thnx a lot for the list, very helpfull.

ranandg
ranandg

The skills listed is quite comprehensive as far as technical skills go, But there is a wider realm of skills that cut across entire IT landscape for example IT audits or even IT Compliance

daveevans28
daveevans28

Thanks very much! This will be hugely helpful!

mikifinaz1
mikifinaz1

I haven't yet seen any real material from you folks about evaluating an employer. That maybe the most important factor in accepting employment. I don't know about you folks, but I don't want to work in a dump with a boss that makes Attila the Hun look like a choir boy. This important facet of getting a job is covered tangentially, I suspect because it is a "supposed to do" because the client may ask you questions about their company to see if you know anything about what they do. The fact that they may be a bunch of jackasses should be important to the person looking for a job and failure to do "do diligence" can create a disasterous blow back if this isn't done by a prospective employee. Desperation should never, ever overcome good common sense. It may be better to wash dishes, or get a Mac-job than have some legacy lurking in your resume concerning a job that may nuke your career. In the good old days before connected everything you could hide one of these mistakes, but not now.

jmarkovic32
jmarkovic32

Doing this would perpetuate the alphabet soup job descriptions that are rampant in IT. I wonder if a doctor has to list every drug he's prescribed, every type of patient he's seen and every type of tool he's used in his practice. No. I wonder if an auto mechanic has to list every type of car he's worked on or every type of tool he's used and oh yeah, the brand of tools because everyone knows that only REAL mechanics use Craftsman tools etc. Sounds silly, doesn't it? Well, welcome to IT where everyone needs to be a specialist.

Aaron
Aaron

I have been using a Skills Matrix for years on my CV as an Independent Consultant, and now we enforce the same format on all of the Consultants that work for/with us in our new venture. The comment I would make about Toni's format, after using a very similar set of criteria, is that the continual update of Year Experience column data to keep your CV current can be a pain. I now separate the Skills Matrix into 3 sections, Expert, Knowledgeable and Familiar with a blurb as to the meaning of the category. Then, for each product/skill I include the range of versions that I have used. Much easier to keep the matrix current as product versions don't change each year, and when I have the chance to target a new skill intensively, it's less likely that a challenge to Expert knowledge will arise

Brad Egeland
Brad Egeland

Nice list and nicely broken up by categories. Easy to translate to a resume...thanks!

oldbaritone
oldbaritone

by Richard Lathrop. It's been around since 1980 - and it's still a good book. Available used for just a few bucks. And worth every penny.

tai1spin
tai1spin

Is there a way you can include security skills like auditing, process development/writing, pen testing, and such?

Ed.Pilling
Ed.Pilling

At the top where you list all the hardware/software you know. You could list all the regulations you are familiar with.

Tony Hopkinson
Tony Hopkinson

on the basis that an employer is doing us a big favour by even talking to us, and we should tug forelock, doff cap, kowtow and slurp accordingly. People who can do all four at the same time being the most desirable employees. Don't have a lot of time for this assumption myself...

kmdennis
kmdennis

This may be off topic, but most jobs these days will list all these qualifications they expect you to have and to be expert at, however most do not even give a salary range so one can decide whether to waste time applying for the job or not. Even though I am not working and looking for a job, there are some jobs that I just could not accept simply because it would cost more to go to work than to stay at home. I would have to subsidize work. I would love to see them post the salary range so we can both save ourselves time, money and frustration.

santeewelding
santeewelding

I think, owing to incestuous coupling of the "I" and the "T".

NexS
NexS

I would be very cautious about putting a full skills matrix on a CV. I mean, what Toni has supplies us here is a great personal resource. Something to help interviewees, not to be put onto a resume. If I were an employer, I would rather see a short(or long, depending on the required application type)description of your relevant skills. Not just everything.

Ed.Pilling
Ed.Pilling

What I did on mine is. First paragraph is a quick summary of my qualifications. Basically the best thing I have done. Then I list my technical skills in categories. Operating Systems: Windows Server 2003 (active directory) ? Citrix Metaframe 4.0 ? Sparc Unix ? Linux ? Novell ? Macintosh Programs: VMware ? Load Balancing ? Server Clusters ? NAS ? WSUS ? PowerShell ? Commvault ? Ghost The way I did it is closer to the top and to the left the most I know about it. So rather than them searching for specific programs and system in the resume its right up front

Ed.Pilling
Ed.Pilling

SUMMARY OF QUALIFICATIONS: Experienced provider of open end solutions: Fifteen years experience, respectively, analysis and creating solutions for business and IT communities. Case in point authored a risk assessment white paper which included SDLC for the management of a centrally located firewall. Initial budget was $220,000 but final expense was $180,000. Within 6 months the project via charge back was generating $49,000 per month or a 326% return on investment (ROI) per year. TECHNICAL SKILLS: Certification: CISA Certified Information Systems Auditor Regulations: HIPAA * Cobit 4.1 * PCI * Sarbanes-Oxley * ISO17799 Security/Auditing: Secure Perfect * Nessus * Snort * Nmap * DumpSec Security Protocols: IPSEC * ISAKMP * 3DES * NAT * PPTP * Cisco VPN

peter.leather
peter.leather

I recommend you have a look at SFIA (Skills Framework for the Information Age. It is an open-source skills framework owned by the SFIA Foundation. It is open to use by anyone and is free of charge if it is used as a skills management tool within an organisation. SFIA provides the most widely accepted description of IT and IT-related skills in the world today. It has been accessed by approximately 15,000 organisations from more than 100 countries. The framework is a large matrix with 2 dimensions. The first dimension is levels of responsibility and the second dimension is skills. SFIA describes 7 levels of responsibility and 86 skills. Overall there are 295 descriptors. Some examples of the skills described in the framework are Project Management, Enterprise Architecture, Information Security & Configuration Management. SFIA is used in a range of industries and covers the private, public and not-for-profit sectors. It has been translated into Japanese, Chinese and Spanish. It can be downloaded from the SFIA website (http://www.sfia.org.uk/cgi-bin/wms.pl/932) Read more: http://exceptional-performance.co.uk/2009/04/using-sfia-10-things-you-should-know/ Can be used for individual CV's and for organisations and managers wishing to manage skills more effectively.

LouCed
LouCed

Very nice list and easy to use. Now security and audit stuff as above would be cool.

LouCed
LouCed

Thanks, cool resource

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