IT Employment

Resume pet peeves you may not know about

A survey of technical recruiters and hiring managers reveal some pet peeves that you may not have thought about. Are you guilty of these?

We all know about the more common pet peeves recruiters have with resumes -- poor grammar, misspellings -- but here are a couple more that you may not have thought of. These came from a survey of technical recruiters and hiring managers on about.com.

  • Writing the resume or cover letter in the third person. I have actually never even thought anyone would do this, but apparently it's common enough to become a pet peeve. And it's also kind of creepy.
  • Using tiny fonts. A lot of people just can't stand the thought of a one- or two-page resume, which is the recommended length, so they employ a microscopic font so they can still mention every technology they've ever laid a hand on. If a recruiter has to employ a magnifying glass to read your resume, you're already losing points.
  • Listing references but not professional ones. We know your brother-in-law thinks the world of you, but unless he's Bill Gates, it really doesn't carry a lot of weight for a recruiter.
  • Attaching a resume with an obscure, significant-only-to-you name. Naming your resume named with the current date is not smart. Give it your name.
  • Writing the resume using table formats (columns). Think in terms of what will be most accessible to the recruiter.
  • Making the resume too long. Okay, this one isn't new to readers of this blog, but I thought I'd mention that it came up in the survey just to reinforce my advice. I can't say it any clearer--a recruiter only needs to see the skills you have that fit the job. He or she is not interested in the evolution of your technical development. You can mention that in the interview.

About

Toni Bowers is Managing Editor of TechRepublic and is the award-winning blogger of the Career Management blog. She has edited newsletters, books, and web sites pertaining to software, IT career, and IT management issues.

179 comments
jaws666
jaws666

With all due respect to Ms Bowers, they don't make a helluva lot of sense. (1) A third-person cover letter is standard issue in military and intelligence circles, particularly at upper levels. It may seem "creepy" to you, and often inappropriate... but the third-person perspective does serve a purpose, particularly for jobs involving sensitive information with ambiguous provenance. (2) This depends too much on a personal definition of "tiny." I'd be far more unforgiving of a resume/cover letter presented in a justified monospaced font with no hyphenation than I would be of a clear, 10.5pt letter properly composed in high-resolution Adobe Garamond. Except, of course, if submitting a legal brief... many of which are required to be in 14pt type! (3) This depends on what your definition of a "professional reference" is. For a midcareer hire from another career, for example, many references that would not be considered "professional references" are far more appropriate; consider the second-career manager or IT person coming out of a military background, or a lawyer transitioning from sole-in-house counsel to a mixed IT/legal compliance department at a multinational firm. In both of those cases, I'll learn a lot more as a potential employer or supervisor from "non-professional" references. (4) That's all well and good if the applicant has an uncommon, but still easy to spell, name. Just how many "Jones.doc"s will get overwritten by the temp over in HR before somebody figures out that at least part of the filename needs to be unique? Admittedly, the date isn't good enough; but name, position number, and last four of existing telephone probably are... (5) This is just stupid. Resumes SHOULD use column formats. The only place for single-column formats is the academic CV. (6) Ms Bowers, with all due respect, you've got no idea what you're talking about when you say that a resume should include "skills applicable to the job only." It's pretty clear that you've never hired for a government job. It's pretty clear that you've never hired for a private-industry job involving government contracts. It's pretty clear that you've never hired for a job with significant privacy-protection issues. And -- most important -- it's pretty clear that you've never hired an older/second-career employee. In each of those instances, a candidate is doing him/herself a DISfavor by sticking to "what's in the job description?" on the resume... and is also assuming that the job description put out by HR bears a strong, or even rational, relationship to what the employer really wants/needs (usually a bad assumption).

thegreenwizard1
thegreenwizard1

---------------- We don't know what you want, as far as I can make out you don't know what you want. Save your company some money, put all the cv's in a bag, get the cleaner to draw out ten or so, it will be just as effective. -------------------- I like it because 95 % of the cases it is true. A lot of HR people are there to do a job, earning money and avoiding stress. How can a person selecting the right candidate if, he or she does not have any knowledge of the matter. CONCLUSION: HR people make your search in an better way. Ask what you want and be ready to read the candidates Resume or CV. YOU ARE PAID FOR IT....

jevans4949
jevans4949

- mentioned by various contributors above. I read a story some years back of a contract programmer who put in his CV: "I have absolutely no knowledge of C++". In the following week he got several calls from agencies looking for C++.

jevans4949
jevans4949

From the POV of someone filling in application forms (for non-IT jobs), a peeve I have is forms that say "list all your qualifications", then allow 3 lines to list 8 "O" Levels, 3 "A" levels and a Degree. Just as well I don't have a Master's ...

donsw
donsw

I don't understand whats wrong with a date. I always have the file name as my name and a date.

Marco Parillo
Marco Parillo

A Professional Services Firm will often attach the resumes of key staff to its proposals, and generally encourages its staff to keep their resumes up-to-date. It is a shortcut for those staff to simply forward this copy without a re-write.

Tekkless
Tekkless

As a manager who has sometimes been involved in the hiring process, there's one word in a cover letter that will send it unread to the reject file: "Hi." The way to start a business letter is still "Dear." Or is it just me?

ossyemeh
ossyemeh

You really have some points there

terry.sanderson
terry.sanderson

How about employers (or recruiters) who demand references with your job application. Hey kids, we're not hiring McDonald's staff here. I've been hiring for over twenty years and have never once requested references until I was about to make a job offer. And I simply refuse to provide references until I have at least had a first interview. And I will never provide references to a recruiter...I know that many of them will then pester my references for resumes and marketing information about their company. TerryS.

taylorstan
taylorstan

In my view, HR has become the tool of huge corporations that has filtered down into small and medium businesses. HR is ment to manage current employees, not find new ones. The people in HR positions have not a clue as to what 99% of the jobs they are hiring for require. The supervisor or manager of the person should be the one weeding out candidates for a position they need. Resumes are overrated. If you truly want to find someone for a position, have them APPLY in-person. First off, anyone who truly wants to work there will show up. Secondly, more than likely, only the ones that posess the proper skill sets will show up. Then collect resumes with the applications to have a better comparison of the candidates. Most companies are using the resume as a workaround for the legalities of the hiring process here in the US. However the employment process has turned into a complete mess because of it. My $.02

spage
spage

As an IT Director, I've hired a few people for the IT Department. My biggest resume pet peeve is when people try to use high-falootin' business-speak to appear business-savvy and more sophisticated. Here's an example: "Forward-thinking individual who assisted in the facilitation and integration of progressive technologies and utilized organizational techniques." The result is a steaming hot bowlful of BS word soup, and an instant game-ender for the applicant.

david_michel
david_michel

I have done both two pagers and five pages. The five pager got me my latest job because it mentioned projects I had worked on that related to what they were looking for. The ojbective of the resume is to get to the hiring manager through all the recruiters. Get to the interview. So I have targeted every resume I have sent in to get past the screening process.

cricket4b
cricket4b

Applying for a job that you have no skills, training, or education for. When someone applies, especially through a job posting, don't waste HR's time by submitting your resume stating your objective when the position is totally different. Do your homework before submitting your resume. Crispy

mpk13
mpk13

A brief account of one's professional or work experience and qualifications is a r?sum? - a word of French origin that has accent marks over each "e." Do not use "resume," which means to begin or take up again after interruption. You don't need to be a French major to know this - you already pronounce it as the French do - but you at least need to know how to add accent marks in Word. Don't make yourself look illiterate by using the wrong word, and don't take advice from authors who cannot set the right example by using the correct word.

mrobisonmr
mrobisonmr

I disagree with the last point. In a longer career, you want to include those projects/positions that advertise you. True, leave out an insignificant one, or one you'd not want to advertise, or one that is not pertinent to your vertical. I'd say these days, 4 or 5 pgs is exceptable. Just make sure you put your stat info on the first page. Education, Skillsets, Clearances, Certs, etc. Leave the details to the end. The first will be seen by initial HR, who don't know the stuff as SMEs. The last will be reviewed by those truly interested and with some knowledge. reason 4 or 5 pgs is exceptable for anyone with some length of career, is that you need to describe the environments, this shows the SME what and how you applied your skills. then you list your higher accomplishments and duties. With tech-talk, this may take up some space. (hey, I didn't create the lingo, but I do have to live it.)

lunchbeast
lunchbeast

OK, seriously, will somebody tell me definitively what "too long" is? I had what I thought was a pretty decent two-pager that's worked well for me up until recently. I updated it for my most recent experience, but got pretty much zero responses with it. Friends and recruiters tell me it doesn't have enough detail and background and pretty thoroughly bash my self-imposed two-page limit. They show me four and five and six page resumes as examples of what senior IT professionals should use and what IT managers want these days. Seriously? I relented and the last two I sent out (I always groom them for the specific listing I'm applying for) were four and six pages respectively. Admittedly, with many clueless recruiters and HR wonks creating experience and skills requirements that are two or more pages long, a long resume is practically demanded. Nonetheless, I'm not comfortable with them. So let me close this circle and ask again, how long is too long?

NickNielsen
NickNielsen

And also suggest you work on your reading comprehension? [i]We all know about the more common pet peeves recruiters have with resumes — poor grammar, misspellings — but here are a couple more that you may not have thought of. [b]These came from a survey of technical recruiters and hiring managers on about.com.[/b][/i] (my emphasis) In fact, I'll even be nice and post the link to the poll: http://jobsearchtech.about.com/od/resumesandletters/a/resume_writing.htm Oh, and your rant? Fail.

tbmay
tbmay

...but times they are a changin'

Jellimonsta
Jellimonsta

You have some very valid points there.

BrainiacVI
BrainiacVI

We used to make fun of e-mails this one manager would generate that would be impenetrable buzzword speak. I used to keep them for amusement. She later became the CEO. So for some strata of the company, it was music to their ears.

tbmay
tbmay

...there are too many people coaching them to do that.

neilb
neilb

and [b]they[/b] never had accents. Idiot Frogs put the diacriticals in because they couldn't work out how to pronounce their own language without help! If they didn't have so many silent letters, they wouldn't have to put marks on the ones they need to pronounce! :) Anyway, resume, pronounced as if it had ONE accent, that on the terminal 'e', has been in the American language for a century or more [/i]sans accents[/i]. Damn! I'm picky today. Must be the weather...

NickNielsen
NickNielsen

[i]...don't take advice from authors who cannot set the right example by using the correct word. [/i] Should we then take advice from those who don't correct their posts to ensure the word they wished to use is actually there? What's a "R?sum?"? Could you possibly have meant 'résumé'? edit: no coffee=snark

DaemonSlayer
DaemonSlayer

You got technologies that choke on hi-bit characters (especially if they are not Unicode compatible/aware/enabled.) If you review your post... you will see your accented E's have turned to question marks, making it harder to read and interpret compared to the unaccented "resume." Oh don't worry, it happens quite a bit with angled single and double quotation marks. (i.e. Word copied to almost any textbox.)

Craig Dedo
Craig Dedo

I strongly disagree with this recommendation. It is customary to drop the diacritical marks when foreign words are brought into the English language. The same is true of foreign capitalization. There is nothing new about this; it has been going on for 1000 years. Only foreign words that have NOT been included in the standard English language vocabulary keep their diacritical marks and capitalization. Resume, in the sense of the job-seeking document, has been included as a standard English-language word for many years. Anyone who would make an issue of this is someone I would not want to work with, much less work for. It is nit-picking about a distinction that is totally meaningless in the larger scheme of things, at least as far as any kind of IT work is concerned. I would like to concentrate on much more meaningful issues, such as whether the position is a good fit for my skills and abilities or whether the firm's culture is a healthy one.

dawgit
dawgit

Lebenslauf ? then??? Or a CV? (Brit-centric European version)

Boganni
Boganni

Sitting in the chair as a hiring manager, I look at a resume to get to know the person and an indication of their background. If you have been working in an industry for 20 plus years, unless you stayed at the same company the whole time it not likely you can fit it on two pages. My resume usually runs over three pages. One page is only education, colleges and technical school. If you are keeping up on your professional development that will happen. I look for content; if the first page catches my attention I WILL read the rest even if it is ten pages.

fremonty
fremonty

As a hiring manager in the past for essentially application software engineers, I look for 1 page resumes. It shows me you can be succinct and understand what I am looking for. 2 pages is ok in some cases. Any more is just laziness. If your 15 years into your career, I don't care about your GPA, your school, or your internships. I don't care about your AS400 experience if I am hiring a ASP programmer. I don't care about how you like long walks and science fiction.

justJekke
justJekke

...it's two pages. 90%+ of the resumes that come across my desk are that length. If you're going past two pages, you should have a good reason to break with the standard. Do you have a long list of industry-relevant publications, a particularly extensive education, or a job history going back decades yet still highly relevant to the job you're applying for? My own resume is exactly two pages and has a job history that goes back to 1997. It doesn't include my education (which was in journalism) because it's not relevant. At the bottom of the job history is a note that says "1988-1996 available on request." To date, only one potential employer has asked for the extended document, which runs to eight pages.

frgough
frgough

decide who they want to interview. Your resume has to make them want to do that. I've routinely written 4 and 5 page resumes and the longest I have ever been out of work was for 4 months during the dot-com crash. The secret is, list your accomplishments in terms of how you made the companies your worked for money. A job is not a right and companies don't exist to provide jobs. They exist to make things and earn a profit. If your resume shows you understand that, you're going to get the interview.

david.allen
david.allen

I have 2 resumes that cover the last 10 years. One is a one-page resume that's targeted for the position and may omit significant periods of job history and tangential skills. The other is a bulleted list of significant skills organized by functional area followed by employer entries with 3 to 4 responsibilities specific to that employer. The long one is now over 5 pages. Just listing 10 years of employers with 6 lines each takes a full page. I've been on the 'other side'. When interviewing at job fairs to fill positions, a one page resume is usually requested for initial screening. I'll sometimes look at submissions that contain 2 pages but anyone who won't follow that simple rule gets cut early.

Craig Dedo
Craig Dedo

I asked this question of a professional career consultant many years ago. She told me that in MOST fields, two pages is the maximum. However, in IT work, longer resumes, e.g., 4 to 6 pages, are OK. The reasons are the ones others have listed. Candidates need to list a lot of skills, degrees, and certifications. Also, they need to list a lot of accomplishments during their career. If the candidates have done a lot of consulting work, then there will be a lot of short jobs in any career of meaningful length. Please keep in mind that many resumes are scanned by automated scanning software that looks for certain words and phrases that are used in the IT industry or in various IT specialties. Therefore, you need to maximize the chance that your resume will match the words and phrases that the software is looking for. This is true not only for IT-related words and phrases but for words and phrases that are specific to particular industries. In one consulting job, my resume caught the hiring manager's attention not only because I had the necessary IT skills, but because it included the term "master roll", used in the paper industry, that I included in the description of the work I did on a previous job. Using that term told the hiring manager that I had some familiarity with IT work in the paper industry.

thegreenwizard1
thegreenwizard1

Every time I wanted a job. I just called the company and tell them my qualifications and my diploma. That was enough for them to say yes or no. And actually I'm working for 3 businesses. One of them I spoke with the boss in a coffee shop and in 20 minutes the deal was done. When to start and how much. Never forget, businesses need you, and do not give power to people who generally do not know the reasons why a company need your knowledges. You need to take control of your life.

i.hilliard
i.hilliard

Many European companies require a Curriculum Vitae (CV), which describes everything that you have done so far in your working life. Unless you are just starting your working career, it is pretty hard to keep it down to two pages. I figure that I am doing pretty well to keep to four and a half pages. Ian

dawgit
dawgit

My 'minimum' Resume, Lebenslauf here in Germany, is 4 pages long... I couldn't even get my Education list on two pages... When I encounter a HR type who's eyes start to glaze over, or can't even get past the first few pages, the interview is over. Thank you for the coffee, but we're through. I already know that there will not be a good match between myself and that firm. And they will not value my experience, or be willing to pay for it either. With (well) over 30 years experience it's just not possible to keep a resume at 2 pages. For fresh baked kids just starting 2 pages is ok, but for a mature person with any experience... a No-Go.

Tony Hopkinson
Tony Hopkinson

For a 29 year and counting career. For every opportunity you miss because you pruned out something relevant in ignorance, you miss another when it looks like you had Dhostoyevsky write it. I've had hits of DEC Fortran, Paradox (for DOS !), UCSD pascal, Speedware, never mind domain experience like ledgers and inventory etc. None of which I've done for five to twenty years. I might target a longer resume at a role if I was given enough information to do so, wouldn't do it for a general one, everything I've heard suggests over three pages is round floor mounted file time.

AgeTheGod
AgeTheGod

I gave up trying to minimise the length and mine is now 12 pages long. Reason for that though is I also break one of the other "rules" (not listed in the blog) and include diagrams with my CV. Recruitment agencies hate them (which is why I only deal with direct employers nowadays) but I've found that the hiring manager appreciates the architectural diagrams to explain what I've done rather than a pile of words. Saves time in the interview to!

RTHJr
RTHJr

Recruiters irked at long resumes in the IT market are unrealistic to demand "just the job qualifications". From start to finish of the job posting to the making of the final offer, the requirements for the job changes over the months as internal managers change their mind or articulate better what they really need in a candidate. The guy or gal who first walks in the door might be qualified for the job as advertized but the one who is hired is the one who had those other soft and secondary skills that the first candidate cut out to keep their resume short. Yeah, hopefully that gets resolved in the interview; but still. An IT resume, that is a resume of an IT technician as opposed to a manager, is going to be 4 to 6 pages long AND DOES NOT drag on about career development history. That is just the nature of the beast; and if IT recruiters do not realize that, then they are discouraging vital information. But ALWAYS target your resume when apply directly for a job. You do this by including two or three high priority skills in the objective line to get the attention while also noting the job posting position name and posting number. Then move on to all your platforms, software, hardware, job duties, achievements, certification, and education sections and float all targeted skills to the top of each paragraph they are in. That way recruiters can just glance down the pages and read what are eye-catching tag lines of key skills. Yeah, your could just go ahead an delete the rest of the paragraph content that trails to make the resume short; but in reality this is what happens: At the point of choosing a resume to read, the recruiter looks at the cover letter. If it is not compelling, the recruiter tends to not look at the resume. If they do look at the resume, then they do like it short and to the point on all the sought for skill sets to decide whether or not to call in an applicant for an interview. But when the interview takes place, often the candidate is given an application that essentially is the targeted resume revisited and the interviewer sits down with the application and the resume. It is at that point that the interviewer WANTS THE LONG resume to dig about the candidate because they like to have good information in writing to mull over and find all the other things that are of interest that may not have been posted online. The guy or gal who only has the short resume that is essentially a duplicate copy of the application does not show much differentiation down on paper to the next candidate.

Peter Sanders
Peter Sanders

Hi I'm with you, IMHO a two page resume is quite sufficient in most cases. This combined with a succinct cover letter (if you are a suitable candidate) should provide enough detail to get you in the door for an interview. Regards Peter

neilb
neilb

Start a formal letter to me with "Hi" and I will smile as I consign it to oblivion.

JamesRL
JamesRL

I brief my references on the interview and what they are looking for before they get called. If you taylor your resume, why wouldn't you taylor your references and prep them.

schrodingerscat
schrodingerscat

. . . we Brits use 'CV' and I had to read the title of the original article a couple of times. 'Resume pet peeves . . . '? Because they were conquered but are now making a comeback? I liked the original article, and I don't disagree with you - I'm just saying . . .

JamesRL
JamesRL

Here in North America, most companies insist on shorter resumes. Two pages is the accepted standard, some people will toss resumes longer than that. Accomplishments are important. I don't need a resume to tell me the duties of a sys admin or a programmer, I want to know how someone made a difference.

dawgit
dawgit

And those were usually the best companies to work for...

dawgit
dawgit

That's the way it is folks... and yup it is going to be way more than a couple of pages. With just two pages, you will be asked if you are really interested in working? (or if you just got out of jail)

neilb
neilb

You might think that Curriculum Vitae means "the course of my life" - which it does in literal translation, "curriculum" being a racecourse - but most, if not all HR numpties will bin one that has more pages than they want to bother with. Three seems to be the general limit. I've been in computing for many years and done other stuff before that. In a CV from me, you'll get my last two - possibly, three - jobs which go back ten years and that's definitely long enough. The first page page telling you why you need to hire me, the second page with my career history and when I reach the bottom, I stop.

Peter Sanders
Peter Sanders

Hi "My 'minimum' Resume, Lebenslauf here in Germany, is 4 pages long... I couldn't even get my Education list on two pages..." That's too much information. While I appreciate the potential quality of your education, to need 4 pages to express it is too much. I think either a thorough edit is due or a different approach is needed. In a candidate review, I would certainly not read all educational qualifications if it extended to two pages. A succinct resume, a great cover letter and (these days) an email can cover an appropriate amount of information relative to the "job" being applied for. One useful feature is to include a link to a web page/pdf file or other suitable additional information. This way a reviewer whose "intelligence" has been piqued by your resume can discern other details as required. regards Peter

DaemonSlayer
DaemonSlayer

It just *_MIGHT_* be a good idea to submit the shorter one to get the foot in, and hand your larger one to the manager(s) interviewing you. Agree? Disagree?

Tony Hopkinson
Tony Hopkinson

Word search engine, recruiter, HR, then hirer. A one page document with a list of buzzwords and contact details would satisfy the first... Maybe be we should start bundling, cover letter, short and sweeet, then life history. Might be worth a try that, hmmmm

tbmay
tbmay

But here in the states, the kids getting out of school now expect a corner office if they make it to work on time 3 days in a row and you'll be doing good to get even a "Hi" out of them. The gray in my hair reminds me just how much my generation is moving out of the driver's seat.

JamesRL
JamesRL

Been hiring for 10 years. When I was job hunting in 2002, I attended a workshop with a top resume writer, who does consulting for one of the major online job boards, one you've heard of through adevrtising. He was the one who stressed it. Now I don't throw a 3 page resume out, but if there is a stack of 300 resumes (and I've been there) I'm not going to read page three unless you've hooked me on page one. Most jobs don't require to know what you did thirty years ago, unless its one of those rare jobs where the 30 year old skill is rare and in demand. And most people spend too much space describing things we already know. I know what a programmer is, I'd rather know the kind of projects you worked on. I got my current job after chopping out all the pre 1991 experience. James

Prefbid II
Prefbid II

It has been at least a decade since I even tried to get my resume down to 2 pages. I used to keep it to 3, but 4 is where it is now. Recruiters, HR types and hiring managers have all liked it. I'm sure I missed out on a few offerings because I couldn't keep it down to 2 pages, but it just isn't possible to describe 30 years of work, covering 3 different industries, and 5 completely different kinds of roles in 2 pages. By-the-way, I got my current employment because of what I did 20 years ago. My more recnt accomplishments were just icing on the cake.

Tony Hopkinson
Tony Hopkinson

You just chuck a comma delimited list of 'skills' in there, barely a paragraph, even for someone like me. It's recruiters who tell us hirers don't want long resumes. Have you any idea how hard it is to compress a 27 year career in to three pages. How could we possibly know which bits we've included aren't that important, and which really useful bits we ommitted to make the cut? Do not say the job description, that generally looks like an ignorant attempt at winning buzzword bingo. Got one with windows SLQ server on it not so long back, f'ing hard to make the cut one that one. We don't know what you want, as far as I can make out you don't know what you want. Save your company some money, put all the cv's in a bag, get the cleaner to draw out ten or so, it will be just as effective.

i.hilliard
i.hilliard

For the most part, HR people don't have a clue what the job entails. More over, these days, first and perhaps even second level filtering of r?sum?s is farmed out to some external company, that knows even less about the job to be filled. First level filtering is generally done on the basis of key words. If the HR people are provided the key word UML, they will look for everyone, who mention UML in their r?sum?. They can get away with this because there are currently hundreds of people applying for every position. This is most often done by a school leaver or even worse by a computer program. The problem with keeping the r?sum? very short is that you may not have the right key words and hence don't make it past the first cut. If you don't ever get a chance to speak to the people, who know what the job entails, you will never have the chance to show that you are the right person for the job. Ian

Tony Hopkinson
Tony Hopkinson

haven't got to Se in the dictionary yet. A is for apple b is for bat c is for cat d is for dunce errm a is for apple...

HAL 9000
HAL 9000

[b]Possibly Sentient[/b] After all you can not give the HR Types too much to work with. ;) Col

neilb
neilb

The though of having to list my O levels, gained before most of those who would read them were born, strikes me as a bit of a waste of time. But I suppose that the CV pared so thin that it can cut Oxygen molecules in half is not something to welcome. either. Maybe I'll cut my CV down to one word and leave the HR types to extrapolate... "Sentient"

i.hilliard
i.hilliard

The first time I sent in a r?sum?, when applying for a position on the Continent, I was asked if that was all that I had done in all my years. It was only after it included everything back to leaving school, was it accepted. It is simply not possible to do that in two pages. I was a little bit lucky. The HR people could have just rejected my application. The point that I make is horses for courses and making such hard and fast rules can cause more problems than they solve. Ian

dawgit
dawgit

or How much of the Education you worked for and acquired would you like like dropped from your Resume? No, thanks, It's part of the who I am. But thanks for the perspective.

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