Tech & Work

Site offers tricks for getting an interview

So I came across this site (, no less) that boasts some tricks for getting past the resume stage and getting your foot in the interviewer's door. Most of the tips refer to those who are sending out paper resumes — choose a color other than white or beige for your resume, use a different size paper — and were fairly low-key. Some were a little adventuresome, but might work, such as sending your resume via registered mail to the hiring manager.

But then things started to get a little weird. The author suggests that it may work to deliver the resume in person. That's all gung-ho and all and will certainly make you stand out in the hirer's mind, but would it be in a good way? I"m not sure how I would take it if someone delivered his resume to me in person. Part of me would be annoyed that he clearly couldn't follow the instructions given in the print ad or job board. I might be a little put off by the action. But I guess there's no real harm in it.

But then the author suggests you deliver the resume with a gift. Seriously. Like a pizza or a bouquet of flowers. He even suggests taping the resume to the pizza box lid (in a zip lock bag). Now, I know a lot of you are all in favor of stepping outside the box on this resume business, but unless you're obsessing on one particular company, this gift giving could become pricey.

But here's a tip that I thought was pretty ingenious (and a lot cheaper than FTD): Attach a post-it note to your resume that says something like "This one looks good — J." The article states correctly that no one has to know who "J" is. The point is, the article says, that the hiring manager will get a resume with a Post-it note on it, stating that it's good. "Therefore, they are more likely to pay close attention to the resume at the direction of another employee." It's worth a try!

Anybody got any other tips?


Toni Bowers is Managing Editor of TechRepublic and is the award-winning blogger of the Career Management blog. She has edited newsletters, books, and web sites pertaining to software, IT career, and IT management issues.

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