IT Employment

The growing field of computer science: Where are the jobs?

the level of employment for computer scientists is expected to grow 19 percent in the next eight years. Check out who's hiring and what the average salaries are.
According to the U.S Department of Labor, the level of employment for computer scientists is expected to increase 19 percent from now until 2020 and this increase correlates directly with the demand for college graduates with a degree in this field.  According to Indeed.com, the average salary for the most in demand job titles for computer science majors is approximately $88,909.

So, for all of those eager and anxious students, where are all of the jobs?

Indeed.com also compiled internal data about who is actually hiring and where, as well as the average salaries for these positions. While many of us would've guessed that it's Northern California where there is the highest demand, surprisingly it's Washington D.C., as defense contractors dominate computer science related job postings. Read on for more information: Top 10 cities where companies are hiring for computer science majors:

  1. Washington, D.C.
  2. San Jose
  3. New York
  4. San Francisco
  5. Boston
  6. Seattle
  7. Chicago
  8. Atlanta
  9. Los Angeles
  10. Dallas

Top companies hiring for computer science majors:

  1. CSC
  2. AppLabs
  3. General Dynamics
  4. Microsoft
  5. Deloitte
  6. Amazon
  7. Man Tech Int'l Corp.
  8. Raytheon
  9. HP
  10. Northrop Grumman
  11. Intel
  12. SAIC
  13. Ernst & Young
  14. Dell
  15. Oracle

10 most In-demand job titles for computer science majors and their salaries:

About

Toni Bowers is Managing Editor of TechRepublic and is the award-winning blogger of the Career Management blog. She has edited newsletters, books, and web sites pertaining to software, IT career, and IT management issues.

39 comments
bonadventure
bonadventure

There is a myth going around that how someone performs in formal education is the best indicator of how someone will perform on the job. The programming field has shot that myth to hell. Unfortunately, HR is sticking to the myth so people are going to college to learn useless skills. The good news is that things will balance out. People who would have normally spent their time learning relevant programming skills will instead learn the out dated ones from college knowing that they will be the only ones who will be interviewed for the job. Then poor programming skills will be the norm and programmers from college will fit right in and the best of the worst will be seen as great programmers.

sjeemahmed
sjeemahmed

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info
info

...you only get what you ask for. As nice and friendly as your boss is to you (like mine), his JOB is to see that you get paid as little as possible, yet get the most work out of you that they can! The current economic clime makes you think that you're up against the wall, and you might be, but sometimes you have to take things as far as you can to get what they think you're really worth. For example, A friend of mine decide to relocate to what she felt was a more active, progressive city. Her boyfriend, who was making $35k a year in an IT role (forget what it was) went to tell his boss he'd be leaving to move with her. To make a long story short, after an hour or more of cajoling, offering and pleading from his boss, an offer to stay of $50k a year was made. "Forget it," the boyfriend said, "because now even IF I was staying I wouldn't work for you. For the past few years, why the H&%$ didn't you offer me even a FRACTION of that?!?" You won't find out until you have one foot out the door. Of course, you also have to be prepared to follow through if they close it on the other foot...

Lou_Bi
Lou_Bi

...for a fresh out of school developer BUT these are very close to the going rate for experienced & senior developers in large Southern California Metro areas like LA & OC. And for contractors is is often more than this in billings. No real shortage of jobs in So. Cal. Metros.

jump28man
jump28man

As I read each post, I am thinking of how much work I put into my studies. Hearing that IT Professionals with certifications and Master degrees are going to not make the money they desire is heartfelt. Cities cost and salaries are down. This is the reality of the economy and the inability of most people not being able to relocate. Change is a part of the IT field, always will be. When a person has a family or buys a home, that person should understand the changing weather of the IT field. I feel the only way to make the money you deserve is to be mobile as possible, yet at the same time notice this is the nature of being an IT Professional. Mr. Allen

abhishek.banchhor
abhishek.banchhor

In India too we find Metro cities to be expensive but it's just that the better opportunities are still within Metro cities (they could be 15 cities in number). Tier 2 cities are trying to catch-up hence most of the graduates have to travel to these cities and are kinda forced to make these cities their Home. Having said that it is also true to that some of my friends have started their startup companies in their native places and they are doing well. Hence I believe that everybody should calculate Career and Growth on individual case to case basis. Salaries can't be generalized only an average can be taken. Cheers, Abhi

eman08
eman08

I'm surprised no one said anything about mobile app developers. Mobile app development is in very very high demand is growing very fast. Its a very HOT! field to get into. I recommend iOS and Android Development. Windows 8, Windows phone 8 and BlackBerry 10 i would recommend too. Employers are all ways looking for talented mobile app developers in this day of age. Now is the change to get your feet wet in this now growing hot field.

D0c
D0c

What is the difference between these and why is there a different Average Salary ?

ruggerid
ruggerid

We are in DC, right in the thick of it, and we need JAVA developers ASAP. We are looking to pay more than what is listed in the chart above with full benefits. You MUST be a US Citizen and qualify for a public trust security clearance (no criminal history/good credit). Reply to us at hr@elicere.com We are NOT a recruiting firm

JavaJobber
JavaJobber

The DoL link in the article is to the occupational job outlook for "Computer and Information Research Scientists" which shows a predicted increase of 19%. That's largely a [b]PhD position[/b]. If you look up "Software Developers" instead, the outlook is actually a 30% increase but median pay is somewhat less. "Computer Programmers" shows only a 12% increase, but a much lower median pay. See http://www.bls.gov/ooh/computer-and-information-technology/home.htm for a wider look at computer and information technology occupations.

kasbb86
kasbb86

I agree that cost of living is important, but equally important is quality of life. As a CIO and tech manager of many years, my experience with younger employees is that they value personal life and freedom more than money. You really have to provide a balanced approach (comp, quality of life, interesting work) to find and retain the best people.

rickle0n
rickle0n

Given the cities and the companies listed by Indeed.com, these figures may actually be "spot-on". However, I think that what's more important is what you, the TechRepublic reader, is experiencing in the field. I vote that TechRepublic conduct their own survey based on the TechRepublic readers' input. The survey should include the city, starting salary, and position, of the TechRepublic reader. If not the actual company name, perhaps it should include the company size. Can Toni Bowers do this? It would be an interesting comparison.

Tony_Scarpelli
Tony_Scarpelli

When my son graduated as Computer/Electrical Engineer one company was offering $118k to move to San Jose, CA or that area. A quick look online finds that you couldn't get a nice 2 br apartment nor have a nice living for that kind of money. Sounds great to all your friends but you would be struggling as most other newly hired people. We found that a $50k job in our own back yard was much more significant of boost in quality of life than was the Cisco relocate. I've been in Computer Science for 20 years and the only people I've ever met who make more than $50k in this field are in sales or management (meaning 3-5 years experience plus the right degree). And even with that they worked for Giant military contractors or top Fortune 500 companies. I have employees with 3-5 years experience take It positions with Boeing, Raytheon, Cessna and LearJet for positions in the $40's and these are Fortune 500 type companies. So reader beware.

tekwrytr
tekwrytr

Two loosely connected points--the salaries for highly qualified experts in the field with 10 years or more experience and computer science majors--creates the assumption (especially in college students) that a CompSci major is instant entry into a high paying career track. That is simply not true. There are still many people graduating with CompSci degrees who cannot get jobs because they are not qualified to work in the real world. That comes with job experience, NOT just education. In real world terms, the specification of a CompSci degree as a job requirement is based on the abundant labor pool--many of whom have the degree--rather than the value of the degree itself.

jtshawtek
jtshawtek

Where do you guys get these salary numbers? This is all made-up statistics to get more enrolled in the computer field. Trust ME, since I have been in the field for 15 years....expect about 50% of these salaries in America.

markh@yorkwater.com
markh@yorkwater.com

We have a very small IT staff and are looking for another hire. We're not in a metropolis, yet the numbers I'm seeing for basically Software Developer I positions aren't that far off of what's listed here. The median is basically $60K for what's essentially an entry level position. Out of college, you might start at a little under $50K. Wow. That's pretty darn good for a place where the cost of living isn't terrible.

dba88
dba88

Please correct me if I'm wrong, but isn't there an offshore influence that aids in dragging down both US salaries as well as hourly consulting rates?? US companies will always hold this over our heads right?? If Americans ask too much, won't US companies simply go offshore, or tap into their L1 visa pool to lower salaries and/or hourly rates?? Why is the offshore influence not taken into account in your article?? This is a constant issue, but anything written by anyone concerning the US job picture must absolutely take into account offshore factors. Am I asking the right questions, or am I off base on this??

randysmith
randysmith

Indeed.com is a job search site, and they have an incentive, for those looking for a job, to make salaries appear higher. And, to some extent, there is also an incentive for these higher salaries, when facing employers, to make them hire talent at higher salaries! Would be nice if there was a more independent source for the salary data.

FAST!!!
FAST!!!

The salaries for the positions listed aren't too far off for a private company that I know of that is located far away from those cities. It really depends on how much a company values its people and is willing to keep them by paying the buck$.

rpocciax12
rpocciax12

i agree with the other comments. I have been in the computer field a long time. I have looked at posts for jobs etc and even asked what they make. those numbers are usually a lot less then any survey such as the above. The only places i have seen numbers like that is in major cities working for major corporations. if one exists without the other knock 20k off those numbers. (example major corporation in a suburb)

gerald.bollinger
gerald.bollinger

Why is it that only people not working in the field make these statements. Everyone who work in the IT field knows there are no openings. Unless your willing to move to India and take a 40% pay cut you are at a real risk of becoming unemployed in the next 5 years in this field.

GAProgrammer
GAProgrammer

Surveys like this are out there to grab people into the field. I can tell you the median salary for these positions is around 40% less in my area due to cost of living. Sure, I could go to D.C. and make 90k a year, but I would really be making much less when I add in all the extra costs (both time and money). You have to think about the whole picture, not just the salary.

buddyfarr
buddyfarr

wish I could get those salaries in my area. System Administrator, $77k, if I was able to move I'd be packing already...

eman08
eman08

wow hear we go. 1.) Referring to Computer Programmer. As of today the title Computer Programmer or just simply Programmer is outdated as programmer is a very old job title that was used back in the early days and was the only software title referring to software engineers etc. software engineers back then was just simply called computer scientist or just programmers. 2.) Software Engineer is an Engineer that is the innovator and problem solver. Software Engineer's plan software systems, get software requirements and analysis and designs the software systems before the programmer also known as developer implements the design and starts the actual code process, debug and test etc. 3.)Developer also know as programmer is simply an implementer that takes the software engineers designs and converts it to logical algorithm program instructions coding in a programming language like Java/C/C++ for an example. 4.)NET. Developers are simply just programmers that do back end or front end development of web applications and web development. They are also know as Web Developers base on their specific function. 5.)Java Developers are simply just programmers that develop and code in the java object oriented programming language. They can do either back end web development, desktop front end development etc. 6.) How ever sometimes Software Developer and Software Engineer is used interchangeable which is pretty common for the same position. but really a developer is just a programmer while an engineer is the problem solver, architect, systems designer etc. Why do you think the title Wed Developer is used when referring to programming a website or web application rather its back end or front end programming. Web Developers are simply just web programmers that implements and codes. 7.) This is where things might start to become a little confusing when refering to Software Developer or Software Engineer interchangeably job titles. The title doesn't really mean much of anything rather your job function is implementation which is product development or design product design. But a lot of employers use the word Developer and Engineer interchangeable for the same job. For an example a software engineer can work for a small company and can do both the engineering and implementation functions. which means the software engineer plans, requirements, design and implement and write the code. So times their job title can be Software Developer, Mobile Application Developer, Web Developer, Java Developer, .Net Developer, iOS Developer etc. But when working for a large company Software Engineers and Programmers also known as Developers have separate job functions. the Engineer plans, gather requirements, design the software system and then pass it down to the developers to write the code. Hope that helps:)

Baruch Atta
Baruch Atta

I went to your company web site and the Careers page shows zero jobs open.

eman08
eman08

I totoally disagree on you about Computer Science degrees cannot get you jobs because they are not qualified to work in the real world. Where is your claim, proof, facts, documents or statements about that? Computer Science gives you the foundation and background to learn more rigors advance things in the real world. I'm myself studying CompSci and it will prepare you very well to learn other programming language much more easier and fast than other people beauce computer science teaches you how to think with all the math you have to take like calc I, Cal II, discrete math, etc. Computer Science also prepares you for other careers outside the computer science field. Engineering and Computer Science degrees are very rigors and can prepare very well for medical school too as i known people that where engineers and became medical doctors. STEM majors prepare you very well for any field. CS grads can even get a lot of IT positions too.

IT.com
IT.com

Look at all of the parties and getting to hang around the intelligent, high integrity crowd in our District of C. The fantastic places to eat $$$ and the comrads at the local watering hole after work. I can just smell all of the public transit bus diesel fumes now. Why, you could even enroll your kids in the public city schools there and they would get a double education, one from the street smarts as well as the leftist union teachers. Facetious humor - I share your same sentiments.

dave the IT guy
dave the IT guy

I live about an hour outside of one Chicago. I could get a job in the city and make probably $20K more than I do now, but I live 10 miles from my office. To live 10 miles from downtown Chicago would mean paying at least double if not triple for a house the same size as I have now. Gas costs more in the city, property taxes are higher, food prices are higher, and my current 15 minute drive to go 10 miles would probably turn into 30-40 minutes. Working in any downtown area also usually means paying to park your car every day.

mckinnej
mckinnej

I'm coming from the same position you are. I live in a small town far from any metropolitan area. (The closest one on that list is Atlanta and that's a 5-hour drive.) I too see the salaries I could pull in and imagine what I could do with the extra money. But after a little more research I discover that $20K raise would actually be a $40K cut due to cost of living. Add on top of that the pain of living in a metro area. It's great for some folks but I'll take my easy 5 minute drive to work over a hour+ daily commute any day.

ZiggyZag
ZiggyZag

Dude, even the semantics sometimes make a big difference. That’s why it’s important to customize your resume for the job you are looking for and to document ALL you skills and experiences so that you are able to do that. Take the Software Engineer. He is also known as a software developer in many instances; in others he is a Java developer, who is also known as web developer sometimes. Same with the Network Engineer, he is known as a Systems Engineer in some places. But in all of these scenarios, look at the difference in salaries that the title makes. SIGNIFICANT!

Slayer_
Slayer_

We are all just peons now....

info
info

...that you can't go by that. Throw your customized resume at any company that interests you. Hound them with follow-up requests. They are LOOKING for people that won't settle for giving up because something seems unavailable.

info
info

Courses such as these teach you what you need to think about. Not HOW to think. There are some people that just naturally think in a logical and analytical fashion. Programming and other IT skills just come naturally to them. The Comp Sci degree will nurture them and help them to hone these skills. If you don't have the natural skills, but the desire and drive, you can still excel and be good at it. Just not a 'wunderkind'. The paper it gives you is a stepping stone to bigger things, but don't delude yourself and think that there isn't a high school dropout out there that couldn't code an AI from scratch that you could never dream of, just because he didn't bother to take a degree course.

jump28man
jump28man

I have to agree with you on this post! I was laughing all the way to the kitchen this morning.

atoms
atoms

and make up for some of those increased costs. I spend $0 on gas or transit getting to work. Living in a city and working in a downtown area means not needing to use a car, not paying to park a car.

eman08
eman08

a Network Engineer is entirely different from a Systems Engineer. Systems Engineers are simply IT professionals that provide maintenance of computer and networking equipment. they install equipment, do upgrades, maintain, config etc. A Network Engineer is mainly involved in network design roles like network architecture design, network performance test, some network maintenance etc. Most Network Engineers hold a CCIE or at least a CCNP, MCSE certifications etc. Software Engineer is usually the person that is a problem solver, plans, get software requirements and analysis using UML and systems engineering approach, following the SDLC, designs the software systems and passes the design down to the programmers also know as developers and the developers implement and write the code, test, debug etc. the whole software team follows the Software Development Life Cycle.

eman08
eman08

Its seems your putting too much emphasis on only just programming and implementation. sure a high school er can get a programming job but when it comes down to real software engineering that's a different story. You need lots and lots of math to work as a software engineer, So a Computer Science degree or Software Engineering degree is worth doing and is pretty much mandatory for Engineering positions. Math and physics majors can get Engineering jobs too. It has to be STEM or computing related degree. Software Engineer's Plan, analyze software requirements, specify and document the requirements, design the software system and then pass it down to the programmers to implement and code the software.

highlander718
highlander718

you pay more for rent don't you ? Anyway, you are right, everything has to be taken in balance (including free time, health, entertainement opportunities - depends on the person) and when you draw the line you can see what make sense to YOU.

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