IT Employment

The interview and answering the no-win question

Salary negotiations are difficult for many people looking for a job. A new book offers some practical advice for getting the results you want.

When interviewing for a job, we've all faced the salary requirement question. Most career advisers suggest that you hold off as long as possible on answering this question. What most don't talk about is how to give the answer once the times comes.

You don't want to go lower than the figure the company had in mind, yet you don't want to go too high and take yourself out of the running. In his new book, Salary tutor: Learn the salary negotiation secrets no one ever taught you, Jim Hopkinson gives some really good practical advice on how to field the salary question in interviews, as well as how to negotiate a raise in your current job. (The book is available as an eBook and the paperback will be in stores on Aug 11.)

In one chapter, he talks about how to field the question, "How much money are you looking to make?" First, he explains that it's important to put this in perspective:

They are the ones offering the job.

The know the need they have to fill, whether it's a Java programmer or a project manager.

They know how much additional revenue can be generated by hiring you and what their current budget limitations are.

So, as much as possible, you should turn this question back on them. Hopkinson offers some examples of wording:

"In preparing for this interview, I did some homework and found out the general range for a position like this, but it was clear to me that it could vary widely based on the company. What range did you all have budgeted for the position?"

or

"Well, I've done some research and I clearly think that the skills that I would bring to this job will make it worth your while, but you're in the best position to determine what a company like yours values for a position like this."

This book is available for $9.99.

About

Toni Bowers is Managing Editor of TechRepublic and is the award-winning blogger of the Career Management blog. She has edited newsletters, books, and web sites pertaining to software, IT career, and IT management issues.

64 comments
davisg
davisg

this is a good tip. thanks

gpfortuna
gpfortuna

Shame on those who have not done their research. bls.gov provides an extensive database of what most positions earn (lower, mid and upper) further refined by geographic area. If an organization is budgeted to pay below industry standards, is that the company to which you want to hitch your wagon?

been_there_survived_that
been_there_survived_that

You should be able to get a feel about whether this is a company that will cross you off if you dance around the question, and act accordingly. If the post is desirable and they demand a number, you should already have one ready that you are additionally prepared to explain and defend. As always, know what you are worth and what makes you so. Then, answer the question with that data. Kobiashi Maru question? Hardly; you should already know the answer.

Ground Floor
Ground Floor

I learned the negotiating rule "whoever mentions a number first, loses". Also, as the job-seeker, especially in today's market, you are usually not holding the position of power in the negotiation. The interviewer is trying to start with two strikes against you. I would respond by asking "If I reveal my salary range to you, will you do me the courtesy of the same?" If you receive a "No" answer, you just learned something about the company (or at least the interviewer) but you can still counter with "Well, if I reveal my range, can you at least tell me today if I will remain in consideration for the position? Otherwise I need to pursue other options". This isn't a one-size-fits-all tactic, but might be helpful to some, especially at mid- to high level positions. If you get "No" answers on both, you may be dealing with a "screener" rather than the hiring manager, or just a hardball or game-playing company. If you do get the position, expect more of the same.

MessedUpLogic
MessedUpLogic

Whilst this is NOT a request to respond and probably breaches ALL policies of TR so do NOT apply. I am a freelance consultant and it will cost you a million squillion dollars to even get in touch (in the words of Dr Evil) I am hiring for a CFO in Germany, a CIO in Boston and an MD in UK, I never reveal salaries and always say negotiable as from previous experience if I find someone who is beyond the pay grade the Client has in mind I will fight for their cause.....and have won many times, hence why as a Programme Mgr and Project Mgr with many other skills I spend 12 hours of my billable week hiring for my Clients.........Read "Good To Great" it has a lot of valuable lessons to success.

Computer Dave
Computer Dave

We all take some level of pride in our work. The aurthor is an editor and presumably gets paid to write this sort of column. If you, Mr MessedUpLogic are also getting some sort of payment for writting then you really should know the difference between "there" and "their". And if a CFO, etc cannot spell, or at least use a spell-checker, then you have to wonder what else they are not capable of. BTW: I think the word you seek is "dyslexic".

MessedUpLogic
MessedUpLogic

How much expensive time from those that can waste time has been spent on pointing out grammatical and typo errors. I spend a lot of time dealing with CFO's, CIO'S, CTO's, CEO's who can not spell. Yet as long as I understand there sentiments and gist and get the job done I look past it and don't have the time to waste pointing it out.....unless in this forum THOSE WHO DO HAVE TIME HAVE TOOOOO MUCH TIME ON YOUR HANDS......... Get back to work Regards Mr Dilexic or is it Dislecic.....Disclexic......oh bollox you get my gist. Someone who writes for Forrester, Gartner, Ovum and many other publications

TsarNikky
TsarNikky

If the hiring company is playing the "cutesy game" of trying to ferret out a salary figure from the candidate, it is an indication of how the company conducts business and treats employees. Do you want to work for a company that plays games or do you want to work for a company with ethics. If a company can't or won't come forth with a stated salary range in the job posting, it is their loss. They will hardly get (or maintain) the best fit for what they are seeking.

richard.b.fowler
richard.b.fowler

It's been stated over and over in this thread -- know what you're worth. I've been very fortunate in my career in that I haven't had any long periods of unemployment so I have been able to hold out for a salary that meets my requirements (and desires). It's going to be harder for those who are more desparate due to extended unemployment, but after a year or two of rebuilding credit even they will be ready to renegotiate or move on. And as AS400 notes, salary should be off the table unless it's part of an employment offer.

as400
as400

In my past life I was an IT Recruiter and I always advised my clients to refuse to answer that question. They could answer how much they are making now but the only answer they could give to ???How much money are you looking to make???? is "I'm sure that any offer you make would be fair." If pressed the second response is "This "x" is how much I am making now and you know your budget and so I am sure that any offer you make will take both numbers into consideration." If pressed again the last response is "I have been instructed by my recruiter not to discuss salary." If you don't have a recruiter you can always turn the question around and ask, "If you are prepared to make an offer then I would be willing to discuss salary once an offer is on the table."

Justin James
Justin James

It's very simple, playing games is the wrong way to start a relationship. I just lay it out very simply: "I believe that this position as you described is worth $X at a minimum. I feel that with my experience and skills, that I should be paid around $Y. No matter what, I absolutely cannot afford to go below $Z." Yes, I tell them by minimum number up front. Why? So they know if they are going to be wasting my time or not. If they ask the reason behind them, I tell them. It could be that it is my current salary and I can't take a paycut. Maybe I love the new job so much I'd be willing to take a paycut. Perhaps it involves a much longer commute so I need a bit of a raise just to be breaking even. Or the local market for this job is really strong and anything less would be grossly underpaid. It doesn't matter where the number comes from. But I've found that putting it on the table up front makes life easy for all of us. It shows them that I am negotiating in good faith. If they cannot offer me anything less than that, they know they it's not going to work out. They also know what I really want, and they will know that if they chisel me on it, how I'll feel. Even when I come in below what they had in mind, they usually offer the higher number anyways, it's seemed. Something I've seen time and time again, are people who think that they are really great and demand a much higher salary than what was going to be offered. These people usually think that they "won" somehow, but they are wrong. For one thing, it sets unrealistic expectations on the new worker... they are getting paid top dollar (or beyond top dollar) and much fewer people warrant it than think they do. And pushing for too much up front leaves them with no wiggle room for raises and bonuses in the future, especially when working at a company that uses a "pay band" system. Obviously, it's better for you financially to get paid more from the beginning, but after a few years of no raises or minimal raises, you start to get annoyed. Finally, pushing hard on the salary issue often puts a sour taste in people's mouths about you. I've seen this a number of times, where someone really was a hardcase about the salary (often for only a few thousand dollars a year), and while actual numbers were never discussed, the team knew that this person really was stubborn and got paid much better than the rest of the team. In one circumstance, one such person actually bragged about it on their very first day on the job! Needless to say, the rest of the team looked at this person really differently, especially when they turned out to be no better than anyone else on the team. J.Ja

ChrisTheta
ChrisTheta

In my experience the best answer to this is to answer in a range, saying it is dependant on the benefits package and other factors. The employer won't weed you out and won't be ready to discuss benefits yet (and if they are it is a buy sign). You really need to do some soul searching and come up with a real answer in your head in order to determine the range. Pick an absolute Low, and a realistic best-case scenario High, and pick a range a bit narrower. If the range you give weeds you out, then that job was not going to fit your requirements anyway -- you don't have to take anything that comes your way. (if you are desperate then your absolute low in your head is still too high and you need to set your sights lower) If they ask the question right off the bat, then it is being used as a weed-out question. Hopefully answering with a range will do. If they ask it later on in the process -- 2nd or 3rd round interview - then it is a buy signal. You can still answer with a range, but narrow it even further, or come up with a buy signal of your own: "Salary is only one of the factors that I am looking for in a company. You've given me a good description of the postion and I really want to come here."

jeff.keith
jeff.keith

Money isn't the only element of compensation - I've always considered things like vacation time and other perks as a part of the package. If you go to work for a company that offers discounts to employees on services, that's a perk that may have more or less value for you. If you can get another week of vacation in a deal - don't write it off - I would gladly take another week of vacation in lieu of salary. What about work-from-home or flexible hours - definitely some value there. On the other hand, "bonuses" are a wildcard and you shouldn't count on them when you're looking at your necessities budget. Being flexible is important - always consider the entire package before you get stuck on salary. If you aren't totally satisfied with the initial salary or overall package, then definitely establish a plan up front for progression - whether that's a title, a raise or additional benefits/perks - if you get those things out on the table in the beginning nobody will be surprised when you bring them up when the time is due. I walked out on a company one time because they refused to follow-through on a comittment for a promotion after I had held up my end of the bargain to everyone's satisfaction. Once you come to an agreement and start working at a company, it is much more difficult to renegotiate your position - especially if you haven't indicated your desire for progress in the beginning. I also don't know why anyone would spend $10 on a book that can be summarized by the comments (even so far) on this article.

sboverie
sboverie

If you researched salaries in your area then you will know the pay range. An important consideration is the ratio between what the pay is and how much the business makes on your work; rule of thumb is 1:3. If you think of yourself as a revenue generator for your employer, then you will understand that 2/3rds of that revenue pays for logistical support, HR and administration. If you want $100K job then you need to produce $300K of value (not just money) to your employer. If you can produce even higher value then you will be able to get better raises and perks. If an employer offers a job that is closer to 1:2 then the job may not be stable, the business decision may not be well thought out or the job is very temporary. An important consideration is understanding that you are trading major parts of your life span for money. Don't waste your life doing things you do not want or like for any amount of money.

blarman
blarman

It is very easy for unprepared employers looking to hire to get fixated on this to the point that they ignore the actual applicants. Employers SHOULD do their homework and find a range, but then they should evaluate each potential employee according to how many of the job skills fit their needs and adjust accordingly. The other thing to do is to structure your pay with incentives for performance and leave the salary at the low end. The performers will merit the incentives, while those just looking to pay the bills will get what they want. This is a tougher road because it means real performance interviews and knowledge of the job in question, but also has a higher upside in potential gains for the employer. For the applicant, do your homework as well. Get the CPI for the area and compare to the CPI in your current area. Unless you are desperate to leave your current employer or you are unemployed, use the CPI to adjust your salary and add in whatever amount would cause you to move (and cover moving expenses). Make this your bottom line figure and don't negotiate past that without forcing the company to give up guarantees as compensation. Don't forget to find out what benefits they offer, as a plan that includes employer-sponsored healthcare, dental, and vision is more valuable than one that doesn't by a long shot. Make sure to consider the whole package.

TheReg01
TheReg01

What excuses do we have these days for posting articles, blogs, etc. that have multiple spelling errors or bad grammar? IMHO no excuses. 1. "You dont want to go too law than the figure" 2. One seemed to be fixed already as posted by BillM777 Aug 11, 2011 @ 7:36 AM (PDT) 3. "The know the need they have to fill" Sorry if I seem harsh.

ppg
ppg

I disagree with the staement "They know how much additional revenue can be generated by hiring you and what their current budget limitations are". They may know their budget limitations but most companies know they need a Java programmer but have only a vague idea how much that person could add to their bottom line because that is very difficult to estimate. I work for a large company with salary ranges for various positions but the salary ranges have more to do with past practices and how much the person could earn elsewhere than how much value the positon adds.

pooloo2094
pooloo2094

You should be able to explain every 'tier' of your salary. That is, the floor means 8 hours, go home and forget about work until tomorrow. The next tier is 8 hours and prepare for the next day. Next up, overtime (of course salaried workers dont get overtime pay right? Right!). Next, is how much of my work depends on me managing the work of others in ANY capacity. That is, how much stress will I have if I take care of my responsibilities but the next guy (could be my boss or a same-level colleague) doesn't meet basic standards. Then there are titles (senior, principle, etc.), and a whole lot of 'value-added' aspects I consider. I tell them up front "Previously I made X when I did this and that. It looks like I will be responsible for this, that, and those for you so MySALARY = Previous Salary + (more time/thought/preparation + greater load on my bag of skills and what thats worth) +/- (lifestyle (travel to and from, and number of factors), company prestige (larger salary at SAP vs. Mom & Pop's Software Kiosk) and other factors)..." Sometimes I win, sometimes I lose and go back to the drawing board. The key is to know how much you are worth when you are employed, and always keep this in the back of your mind. If you are not employed, than you need to do some research. However, you dont need a book to tell you that...

comguy1
comguy1

Most companies today just want whoever will work the cheapest. The attitude is "There are hundreds of other people who could do the job so any one of them is disposable." Management views everyone below them in the food chain to be fungible. Career planning in today's Tea Party "bash the working people" environment is a joke.

llandau
llandau

what I hate are companies that ask you what you made the last 20 years you have been working in the beginning of the application process. This is another screening tactic. They should be telling me what their salary range is for the hiring of the position. I agree with computer Dave - Tell me what the job is worth (to you) and let me decide if I want to pursue it.

security101
security101

... clearly didn't proof-read the article for all the grammar mistakes, so, I can't take it seriously. Do YOUR research, author, then, profess to tell everyone else to do theirs.

tech
tech

While advise of putting off revealing numbers or turning it back on them can work when it is a sellers market (there is a shortage of qualified individuals), that advice will not work when it is a buyers market (un-employment > 4-5%). Guess where we are. You want the job, Give a number or a range based on benefits travel... otherwise there are plenty of others out there that will take almost anything and they aren't going to waste time volleying with you.

MessedUpLogic
MessedUpLogic

I got asked this question some 12 years ago before I became a Freelance Consultant PM. I answered pretty much via the advice given in this article and I was turned down for the Job. Ironically we became indirectly friends with one of the HR team who said that the Hiring Managers realised you were on top of your game and decided to go with someone who wasn't. (FOOLS in the long term) suffice to say it didn't work out as the person chosen left for a higher salary 6 months on. Irony No2 this Customer came back to me in a position of desperation and used me as a Consultant PM.......and made more in 4 months than they were offering as a Salary. People often play the short game and completely forget the long game.

Snooki_smoosh_smoosh
Snooki_smoosh_smoosh

If it is a lateral move say moving from one company to another, it will often depend on when the last raise was. If it has been a while since a raise in a lateral move then, I usually take my current salary and boost it by like 5 - 10%, again pending on what they typically start someone out at in the new company, and what the cost of living in that area may be. If the move would be a promotion with a significant raise already involved, I don't get greedy, I ask for the starting wage of that position, but not before doing research in the type of position etc, to make sure it is a good wage for the job and location. Salary dot com is a good resource for that. Reality is, do research. Figure out what other people in the area make in the same position, what a position typically starts at, cost of living in that area, and what you are bringing to the table. Don't get greedy, but don't sell yourself short either.

GreyGeek77
GreyGeek77

Either it is not enough, or you have the wrong person in that position...

Computer Dave
Computer Dave

My ultimate pet peeve in the job-search process is the ads that DEMAND a salary history or "requirement". First, it's none of their business what I've made in the past. I see this tactic as the HR Dept just being lazy. Second, if the company wants to use the salary they're willing to offer as a criteria for the interview process, then post it in the ad and let job-seekers screen themselves. I don't have a salary "requirement". Tell me what you think the job is worth and let me decide if I want to pursue it.

gwjones12
gwjones12

How much did this author pay to have his book advertised on Tech Republic as an "article"? For sale at $9.99 at this location...

scotth
scotth

When I'm asked what salary range I'm looking for, I usually ask the interviewer, "What is the salary range the position offers?" Sometimes I've been given a range and reply, "We can work within that easily." But sometimes I've been asked again what salary I want. Trying to turn the question on the interviewer doesn't always work.

BobH1234
BobH1234

In my experience the best plan is to tell people you know what you would like to earn - x. The max of that the job could pay in the market. Then tell them that you are happy to join at y less than this figure (the low to medium salary point) but only on the basis that after 3-6 months they put you up to x or fire you. It must be a contractual point not a verbal promise. Say you stand by your work and your belief in your worth and that you want to prove this to them at the minimum of risk. After the time period you are either too valuable to not get the salary you want, or it was time to leave. Sounds like a risky plan to people, but if you believe you are worth the money it does work and it shows both parties that the risk and reward go hand in hand. What company wants to take someone on who they have to get rid of and go through all the hassle again. Although I have not had a lot of full time jobs I have used this each time and has appealed to people. Even for the jobs I have decided not to take.

Jonno-the-First
Jonno-the-First

I feel any company that asks that sort of question, may just do so to use it as an excuse later, after the interview, not to hire you. I would say "I am worth a lot to you, but feel if the answer is going to disqualify me from getting this job, please tell me what benefits besides salary there are, and let me think about it. Its not something I like do on the spur of the moment." I'm sure they will understand. They also need thinking time.

Tony Hopkinson
Tony Hopkinson

They've got a 'value' they put on the role, I've got a value I put on me. I've got a minimum, they've got a maximum, If they are over my minimum and I'm under their maximum, then we can negotiate within those bounds, if either is out then we aren't going to come to terms, and so we should cease wasting each other's time. The earlier we know where we are, the less time we waste...

MessedUpLogic
MessedUpLogic

I am on a 6 figure salary and rising......despite your advice. But Thanks for the Trial-ogue. Some good points though if I want to earn less.

Robiisan
Robiisan

...those who post responses and comments here need to carefully spell and grammar-check their own work, as well as utilize a good dictionary. There appear to be no automated tools available here. Alternatively, you could create your entry in Word or another WP program, check it there, then copy and paste it here; but that seems like a lot of effort for a blog post. Not to be harsh on Toni, I still feel compelled to comment that in writing an article for publication to thousands, the extra effort should probably be taken. Doing a rush job and not having the article proofread by one or more set of HUMAN eyes borders on an attitude of laziness, particularly in one who should be well aware of the limitation of spell-checkers (if it's a real word, it's OK, even if it's the wrong word or in the wrong place). The necessary tools ARE available to you, Toni, including the other eyes. To avoid future comments about your credibility and rancor about your articles, I would humbly suggest you avail yourself of your resources. No, I'm not perfect, either. But in order to prevent my comments from coming under similar fire, particularly in THIS post, I read my comments from the end, backwards to the start, visually checking the spelling of each word as I read. It removes the "I read what it was SUPPOSED to say, instead of what it actually said" syndrome that often misses misspelled words. I used a dictionary to confirm spelling and usage if I had the slightest doubt - at 60+, my memory is not what it used to be. I don't want a request from Justin (below) for MY resume. :-) All I'm saying here is, knowing my all-too-human fallibility, I double-check my work, particularly when it is for other eyes. And, yes, there have been times when I've still missed a goof and published. May all my readers, and yours (all of you out there) have mercy on my soul, if not my pen/keyboard, and kindly recall that the world did not cease to exist as we know it, when the error was published. :-)

tony_davis
tony_davis

I noticed these too. The article isn't long enough to contain so many mistakes.

pooloo2094
pooloo2094

Can you understand ALL of the points of the article? Sure the credibility of the article comes into question with errors, however this isn't a scientific journal. It is a blog. Sheesh!

Justin James
Justin James

Please send me your resume, I'd like to have someone on my team who never makes mistakes. J.Ja

lkuhlman
lkuhlman

"...today's Tea Party 'bash the working people' environment" Are you serious? I'm pretty certain that unless you're looking for a government job, it's the "TEA party" people that are interested in creating jobs for people--not bashing them. My apologies to the moderator and membership for making a politcal statement on this technical blog. I just couldn't let comguy1 get away with a hit-and-run comment like that one. Oh, and by the way, I actually agree with rest of his comment.

BillM777
BillM777

I know; it was supposed to say your not you. Sorry for the oops. Please don't get on the editor for that - it was MY mistake! I admit it me GreyGeek - you caught me!

nyexpat
nyexpat

Computer Dave is dead on. HR IS lazy!!! (sorry folks, you ARE). They KNOW what their range is and are just fishing for those who will take less. Of course, they'll hire someone who's good enough and will pay more, but not if they can help it. duh. Posting ranges (not just years experience, bc some companies pay more than others) SHOULD be the way to go. It will save EVERYONE a LOT of time.

MessedUpLogic
MessedUpLogic

I am sure that he/she (Just to be PC) works for a living not for the goodness of mankind - Says Spok.

Tony Hopkinson
Tony Hopkinson

There's job satisfaction, adding marketable tool, skills and domains, new challenges, location, ( bean bags, holidays and free gym membership and such don't count with me). Lots of scope for good employers, if they want a good employee... But when it comes down to it, I've bills to pay and family to support, those responsibilities are not negotiable.

Justin James
Justin James

Let's just say I'm doing just fine myself with that strategy. Every job I tried it on resulted in a raise of $10k - $20k from my previous position. As someone who's been in a hiring capability, I can tell you that candidates that like to think they are Donald Trump are a headache to deal with. It says volumes about their attitude, and often, the folks who played the games were the worst ones to deal with. From my perspective as an employee, I don't want to work for companies that feel the need to hustle folks. If they cannot negotiate in good faith from the beginning, it is a sure bet that I'll get burned later on. There are a lot of people in here taking the stance of, "well, they have the job, you're got to play it they way they want to." Maybe for them. I am *not* a commodity employee, and I recommend to anyone that they also work hard to not be a commodity employee. Typical IT programmers... say, C# Web developers with 5 years experience are a dime a dozen, and they have to play games to exceed their peers at the salary table. But if you've developed unique skills or experience, it is easy to get what you should be getting without playing games, and even in a bad economy you can meet your goals. J.Ja

Computer Dave
Computer Dave

I don't know about you, Justin, but I doubt very many of us here are paid editors. I tend to hold people who write for a living to a somewhat higher standard when it comes to the written word, much like the people you support would hold you to a higher standard of computer knowledge. If this were the 1st time a Tech Republic author had ever erred it would be one thing. But I can't remember the last TR article I read that didn't have at least one spelling error, grammar mistake, or typo. It speaks to the whole world having to do more and more with less and less, all in the name of corporate profits and shareholder value. And that speaks volumes about the current state of the economy in general, and out industry in particular.

Rottman3D
Rottman3D

"You don???t want to go too law than the figure the company had in mind" Too law? Too low? Neither. Just say lower.

bob44dotcom
bob44dotcom

JJ: Editing is a challenging job; one that's exacerbated when required to perform the task via electronic format. Hard copy is easier on the eyes, but I'm betting the rate of content and medium used make printing and each page an improbability. --Bob

Justin James
Justin James

Send an email to Toni, I am sure that she can get you pointed in the right direction. I am not sure which editor handles the queries up front. J.Ja

Justin James
Justin James

Spotting typos in things is insanely hard, especially when you do it day in and day out. The editors at TechRepublic probably pore over more words per day than a traditional newspaper or book editor, and they do it with tighter timelines too. Furthermore, the computer screen is a lousy medium to proofread on, especially with many of the applications that the writers and editors have to work in. Some of them pick default fonts that make things just blur together, especially if you have been looking at a screen for 8+ hours a day. I know that for myself, by the time I get to work on my articles, my forearms are cramping so badly that I can barely use a mouse. I have things that I have had *four* different people proofread, and I have re-read a number of times myself, and yet there are *still* mistakes in them. Does that make me stupid? Does that mean that the other four people I asked to read them stupid too? Or does it mean that we're human? Are there lots of articles here with these kinds of mistakes? Sure. I see plenty of articles here where a bunch of folks decide to play tackle football with the writers and the editorial staff. Am I downplaying the important of grammar and spelling? Absolutely not. They are important. They are less important than the content quality itself, though. You can have all of the standards you want, but the fact is, while the writers at TechRepublic may get paid to write, few of them are "professional writers". They are IT professionals, the same as you. For some of them, English is not their native language. Others may have all sorts of other limitations. I doubt that any of them have degrees in English, Literature, or similar subjects. I think that amongst the writers here, I am probably the closest to that (I double majored in History and Philosophy, and spent a ton of time writing a ton of long-form papers). Getting upset because someone who spends ten hours a day in a server room and then takes the time to share what they've learned with you may be your right, but being nasty about and throwing around this "it hurts your credibility" line is meanspirited at best. Or to put it another way, what would you rather see here? A bunch of English majors with perfect grammar and spelling cranking out inaccurate articles or just quoting press releases and pundits? Or a group of experienced IT professionals who make the occasional mistake? Here's a suggestion: TechRepublic is *always* open to new writers, last I checked. In fact, I know that we recently put out a call for more writers. Instead of playing armchair quarterback, try out for the team. J.Ja

pooloo2094
pooloo2094

ahem..." out industry in particular "

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