Leadership

The problem with IT contracting

A TechRepublic member is deeply dissatisfied with life as an IT contractor. Read about his experience, and see if you can offer any advice.

A TechRepublic member is deeply dissatisfied with life as an IT contractor. Read about his experience, and see if you can offer any advice. 

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

I heard from a TechRepublic member who is becoming very disillusioned with his IT contracting career and would like to hear from others about their experiences. Here's the e-mail:

"I want to express my dissatisfaction with the idea of IT contracting. I am working on a contract for a local company. I find myself being taken advantage of. The contract company has me working on a W2. I get no holidays, nor sick days, nor vacations. I am basically working in a very hostile situation. I had to go to the dentist for some work on my teeth and basically had to take 30 min lunches for two weeks to cover the time I had off.

The client companies are inflexible and at are times unwilling to help since they feel like they can save a buck or two. So much for the human element.

With the economy going the way it is, I need to make a secure income, and therefore I am stuck in my area. I can't seem to break out. I have tried to land a full time job, but my track record shows contract companies, which many full time companies do not want to see. Now, with the holidays coming, I am forced to work almost everyday and have no vacation. I don't think I am asking too much, but I wish someone would give me a break.

Here is an example of inhuman behavior: My client manager says we are going home early for the Thanksgiving holiday. I inform my family that I will be home earlier, and I can stop and pick up some items at the grocery store. The hour which the manager said we would leave comes and goes, no further word. I wait and go to his office, and he is on the phone with his family informing them of who knows what. He says he will come see me later. I go back and start working. My shift ends and I pack up to leave and he informs me that I need to stay an extra hour because he was working on a last-minute assignment.

Many of the client companies often take advantage of the contractors. They let the full-time employees leave and make the contractors work their shift. I know of a guy who needed to take some time off for the holiday and is basically losing money because he is not working. It not like all contractors make a lot of money; in fact, most don't. Many are lured into thinking they're going to make big dollars and become trapped.

Many staffing companies don't offer benefits that help their contractors. They don't look to develop their core contractors. They simply find jobs and recruit other companies for those positions. It seems like a big game. I am tired of playing. I would never have wanted to get involved in this circus if I would have known it would be like this."

The benefit of working for a contract company is that you don't have to worry about finding work for yourself and figuring out how to bill. With that consideration, you have to take the good with the bad. My first impression at reading this e-mail was that this person is not having a problem with IT contracting as much as he is having a problem with the contracting company he works for. When you're choosing a contracting company, you should do a great deal of homework about what kinds are out there and how they treat their contractors. The IT contracting business is so lucrative that companies can have nothing on their minds but profits.

As far as the problems with the client manager go, you should be able to inform your contracting company about the behavior and let them handle it. Their willingness to do something is another sign of a good contracting company.

Now, having said that, I don't know how common this kind of behavior is in the contracting world. For input on that, I will turn things over to the TechRepublic membership...

About

Toni Bowers is Managing Editor of TechRepublic and is the award-winning blogger of the Career Management blog. She has edited newsletters, books, and web sites pertaining to software, IT career, and IT management issues.

49 comments
derickya
derickya

The biggest culprits for reason middle men sitting and making money doing nothing is the lazing disorganized and disloyal HR personal, It is their job to look for people, not delegate to some body shoppers.

ancientprogrammer
ancientprogrammer

I've done a good bit of W2 and 1099 contracting over the years and yes, the experience is about like what's described in the article. The upside, which isn't mentioned in the article, is that if you negotiate well you can make much more money than you can working as a regular employee, at least during the good economic times. In bad times, like now, it's a choice between working or not working. I do recommend looking for ways to supplement your income by taking short term freelance jobs and other means available to make money online and offline as well as maintaining an emergency fund of several months income. If you have enough cash reserves and backup cash flow you can walk away from a 'Lumbergh-ish' situation.

jmelmore
jmelmore

From my experience on the recruiting side of IT consulting, this is definitely a problem with the conulting company itself. As a recruiter I pride myself in the equal treatment of all employees, both contract and perm. Unfortunately, many consulting companies now create a "body shop" environment that both manipulates the consultants and recruiters. Those are situations to stay away from at all costs. Research is the best idea, as well as an in-depth interview process from the standpoint of the consultant, but unfortunately consulting companies can change structure internally so quickly, this situation can change without notice. From a consultant's standpoint, if the situation does not improve, find another consulting company, work with their clients, and walk away from the situation that gives no benefits of staying.

Irishluc
Irishluc

I think someone here needs to check the IRS regs. regarding what constitutes an employee or an (independent) contractor. First an foremost you need to recognize the fact that IF you are a contractor you are an independent (form 1099 not w-2)also you must have a written contract, or agreement, specifying exactly what your functions as a contractor are, i.e., responsibilities, compensation, etc.. If the company requires you to keep specific hours or work a certain number of hours each day or week Then you are an employee not a contractor. There are other fine points in IRS regs. that differentiate between contractor and employee, but in your situation, as it is worded then you are an employee which is why you receive a w-2 rather than a 1099, and as such you are entitled to ALL bene.'s that the company gives to other employee's. Check it out and you will find the company is xx??xx?? you on this. You can also make them pay back employee wages, vacations, sick pay, unemployment, social security, and so forth, as they are violating not only federal laws and regs. but most states as well. I am not an IT pro but have owned my own business (trucking) as well as being an independent contractor, called owner/operator in trucking, and have also been an employee (something I would NEVER be again). Sounds kind of like maybe you didn't do your homework. Check it out and Good luck.

fishjacks
fishjacks

I am contract and am experiencing the exact same thing. This was like reading my own bio. Sounds like it's more common than people think

pdavila
pdavila

Too much whining ... Like many things in life, it's about what you want out of it. I love it, but this is how I'm doing it: I own a 34' RV and a 4x4 Jeep Wrangler that hangs out the back of the RV. I try to get contracts for 6 months or so. At the end of the contract, I go RVing all over the US. No realestate taxes to pay. No expensive lifestyle to maintain :-) I go to places I would otherwise never go to. I meet great people on the road. This week, for example, I'm parked 20' from the Ocean in Carrabelle, FL. I'll be here another month. Life could not be better. Contracting enables me to have a great lifestyle.

Brendan P
Brendan P

Rule # 1 Trust your judgment. If the situation is bad (for you), look for one that suits you better. I.e. "Pick your poison"... Heck you could always be a consultant, i.e. work for yourself, and get to work 24/7 for your client. Which brings us to: Rule # 2 It is the rare work situation that is "ideal." People can be miserable. They can also be wonderful. Look at yourself. What problems can you work with constructively and what are corrosive to you. See rule number one. Rule # 3 It is not about you (or any of us) If you have been kind and done good work, then you do not need to own the conflict, either in fixing it or fighting it. So stay with what you have; if it is ok; if not, see rule # 1. Be kind, do good work, Trust yourself, more on.

kjmartin
kjmartin

A contracting company is a reverse union designed to benefit the employers. A contract company controls access to jobs while a union controls access to labor. Each entity changes the work relationship to favor who they represent. The best advice to avoid both situations since neither entity is interested in you at all.

drmoore
drmoore

Not all contracting jobs are like that. The problem is some clients are just very anal and don't care. I have been a contractor since 1997 and it is very rewarding. Once you step in the world of contracting you need to structure yourself as a small business and start selling your services. Get away from that W-2 and get on 1099.

cupcake
cupcake

I have done 'W2 contracting' on and off for a total period of about 13 years (California and Missouri) and only once did I even encounter a company -either the one I was doing the work for or the company that represented me- ever not treat me well. And even the one that wasn't owning up about how much they were keeping of the what the company paid for, was paying me very well (but was keeping about 50% - that was straightened out quick tho). The company I work for now not only gave me time off (paid) for the holidays, they had me filling in for an FTE supervising 5 other FTEs! I think that my background, my confidence and my experience accounts for that. I feel very lucky that I have worked for some very good companies and agencies over the years. Oh, and also, two of the previously mentioned 7 companies also turned into full time positions. And have my fingers crossed with my current assignment. BTW, I consider myself a 'contractor', generally referred to as a "W2 contractor" as opposed to a "1099 contractor".

Ron Larson
Ron Larson

When you do contracting are the salary's in the surveys close to your charges or are most of you above or below these averages?

kytl
kytl

I am in a similar position, I am trying to get out of the confinement now. Most contractors do treat the contractee unfairly - regular employees got paid before Christmas - I had to wait on the desinated payday which is Dec 30th. Also full time jobs are hard for me to find also. I suggest you use your skill set to do other things in your off time until th damn breaks.

oschmid14
oschmid14

I can feel for you. I have been in a couple of similar situations. At one time I was hired by a large consulting firm to do a PM contract overseas, since all their PM were busy working on other engagement. It was great pay, even it was an "all inclusive" pay rate. When I arrived at the customer site of my new client, I learned that they just this day were able to fill the position internally and that they would not need me anymore, at least at this time. I had a contract that stated that they had to give me 2 weeks notice and I had to give 4 weeks notice (it was a 6month plus contract). I was there for 4 days and was told that they most likely would need me back later this year to start the second part of the contract in South America. Due to the potential to continue working for them in South America, I never pushed the issue that they had to give me 2 weeks notice, potentially owing me my contract fees for this 2 weeks. To make a long story short, I was never called back on the contract and learned also that they were able to fill my position for less money internally with somebody of their own organization. Many companies and I realized, especially the larger ones, do with contractors and consultants whatever they want to do, since the know that this person will not do anything due to the fact that there could be future engagements. Contracts don't seem to be worth the paper they are written on. I worked with smaller firms and never had these issues. Smaller firms may take a little longer to pay you and are not as flexible in giving you required time off (doctor visit, other personal matters, etc.). This is why I usually have in my contracts one optional day a week for my personal disposal.

dragonkin37
dragonkin37

I have been a contractor for DoD for 6 years. Working for 4 different companies over that time as a contractor. I have had no problems working as a contractor. Pay is great and the people I work with are all very professional and happy to exchange ideas and thoughts, I am very sorry that alot of you guys are having these problems with working as a contractor. Hope u all have a happy holidays

gilberto
gilberto

I used to do contracting work and I hated it. Now I have a full time job and feel like 5 tons of pressure are off my back.

hotfireair
hotfireair

It sounds like this individual is not prepared to be a contractor. Being a contractor is running your own business - you're the boss. You select your client based on demand for your services and you do what you can to please the customer. You also get to choose which customers to accept and which to get rid of. If you do well your business grows, if not you go out of business. But you don't complain about your customers, vacations, time off, or lack of respect on the job because it doesn't do anything to the bottom line. This is what some employees get do and still get a steady pay check.

D.I.Y.
D.I.Y.

I remember every contrcat that showed up had the phrase, "Contract, possibility of permanent hire." I once showed up at a job, and they were very clear, no possibility of hire, yet the contract was labled as such. If I hear the phrase again, I may strangle somebody. I will never work for one of these con-job contracting agencies again.

thamadgreek
thamadgreek

I have just got in the contracting game and have been on it for 2 years now. What I think is horrible is how these companies will hire contractors to do most of the work, look you in the eye when you are done say thank you for assisting us in making all this money, who ever you worked for getting promoted for your work and good bye. This happened to me twice with the same company ( SDG&E ). Not that I am bashing but they would have the nerve to release a report of earnings for the year make the statement that the contractors assisted with most of the work and how the employees are going to celebrate while we continue to work. Then of course they all come back with bonus checks and that is it. I also see the crud they pull as they will keep contractors working for them for years so that they do not have to offer benefits to the point that they get suied for the years they have manipulated these people for the better good of them selves. I believe that as a contractor that there should be more laws to assist us with a better oppurtunity to get hired on. They have laws for the employers to assist them with getting away with it but not securing the people that work for it. Oh well I will continue to contract till that one beautiful day that I get hired on to a company. Oh well I guess we do still have Slaves in the united states of america. Oh wait we are getting ready to have "Change" right? Well only time will tell.

that1guy15
that1guy15

So I have been looking into the contracting/Consulting field for about a month. Im looking into the larger national firms to work for. Is this the same type of situation for these companies? What he is decribing sounds like a "temp" company in his local area.

I_Borg
I_Borg

Join the military!

sboverie
sboverie

I have worked for comapnies that act as 3rd party resource for other companies. I have worked 4 different sites with a mix conditions. The places that were good to work were the ones where I felt welcomed to the team and that my contributions were valued. These were the places that helped me grow and expand into other areas of support. The worst places were those that either worked me like a dog or were indifferent to me. The lack of support by the managers quickly make an onsite contract turn into a drudge. Consulting is going to be a mix, the best places to work are going to those places that welcome you into the local team, give you the support and tools to do the work and give you respect for what you do. The worst places are those who have high demands and treat you like an expendable part.

Mabrick
Mabrick

Working for a contracting company is not the same as being an IT contractor. That was his first and largest mistake. If he/she has valuable skills then she/he should be able to setup a real contract company under an LLC and go it alone. Yes, that requires some business savvy. This is not outside the realm for IT geeks to master. Look where it got Bill Gates. As for the contracting companies I say kick them all to the curb and stomp on them. I had a contracting job once with a REAL IT company which had a contact with a Fortune 500 to convert a large campus from Windows 95 to Windows NT. When my company was underbid by one of these contracting companies my position evaporated so to speak. I interviewed with the contracting company because I was asked to by the Fortune 500 manager in charge of our original contract. I laughed my way out the door half way through the so called interview. I think what finally made me get up and walk out was their refusal to take into consideration my college degree in Computer Science or the experience I had. They wanted me to take a substantial pay cut. I told them to take a hike. That is how we protect our positions and avoid becoming just another service industry like the folks who vacuum the office floors at night. We have to refuse to work for the schmucks who are looking to dodge employment laws and make a huge profit off our expertise. Never forget that WE have the skills THEY want. Hold out or go private. Anything else is selling yourself short and the rest of us with you.

mjbdiver
mjbdiver

I myself worked as a contractor for a large water management district several years ago. While the job itself was rewarding, the contractor aspect of it was not. As a contractor I got no benefits and no vacation time. If I wanted a day off it would be one day's less pay. Worse, there was no income tax withdrawn from my paychecks, which was nice in part because the checks were larger, but when it came time to do my taxes I ended up owing a huge chunk of money. I do agree with the argument that IT contracting is a game. It's a game of chance and false hope. I was hoping my contracting position would end up into a full-time job but it never did. In fact my contract ended when another staffing company outbid the one that helped me get this job. IT contracting is not the best way to make a living nowadays, but it's better than nothing.

armandoamadrigal
armandoamadrigal

You right, there are a great many people who are having the same issues.

fishjacks
fishjacks

I contract and make less than 30k/yr. How do I get in where you're at? Or are you independent?

cupcake
cupcake

My experience has been my salary generally is above average compared to the FTEs that I work with. Although when going permanent, I always seemed to get a nice bump in pay along with perks... once I got 3500 stock options!

JohnMcGrew
JohnMcGrew

...you refused to make them honor it. Yeah, I know. You only walked away because you honestly thought that there was a chance of future work and didn't want to risk that. But look at it this way: If an organization is dishonorable enough to stiff you on a written contract up front as they did, then why should you expect that they would honor an unwritten contract at some theoretical date in the distant future. This is one of the more difficult lessons to learn as an independant consultant. It took me years. But I finally got it, and when this happened to me, I made them pay. Yeah, I never got any more work from those people. But guess what? I wasn't going to get any more anyway!

jaunine
jaunine

I wholeheartedly agree with what you are saying. We have the skills, which cost us time, money and persistence to obtain in the first place. And this is what I did in my home country (South Africa). I worked for good money in good conditions, delivering to my client the skills and experience they were seeking. But then I signed up with a consultant company in the U.S. For as long as I could deliver billable hours, myself earning about 15% of what they charged for my skills, all went well. They even eventually started my promised green card process. But then the economy took a turn for the worse. Myself and an English were let go and after a few weeks reemployed? At a significantly reduced rate (which is definitely not what the INS was told that we?ll be earning). And the break in employment meant that the green card process was stopped? What a life. I?m back in my home country now and once again am working by the ethics that I believe in. It would be nice if the illegal actions of some employers in the U.S. (and everywhere else for that matter) could be addressed.

dixon
dixon

Maybe I'm far more fortunate than I've realized, but I'm totally freelance, never anybody's employee, and don't let anyone push me around or dictate my schedule. I've passed on tons of opportunities, maybe, but I've always been able to make this work in a reasonably profitable way, and rarely encounter a client attitude other than heart-felt gratitude for what I'm able to do for them. At the risk of sounding arrogant, I've found that you really have to maintain the position of 'them needing you more than you needing them'. If you ever allow the clients to feel they're doing you some sort of favor, or that they're paying you more than you're worth, you're sunk. I would suggest some serious soul-searching for the guy in Toni's article; the problem seems to have more to do with self-esteem issues than the IT trade. He should dump the jerks he's currently dealing with, get himself a small group of really good business clients, take exceptionally good care of them, and never look back. Frankly, I can't post the sort of language I would have used had a client ever tried to keep me from a dentist appointment or a holiday dinner.

cyclo
cyclo

I have been a contractor for my 1 man company for more than 10 years. My company deals with the headhunters who then deals with my clients. Through the years, I have seen various shades of headhunters... some good some bad. Headhunters unfortunately are a necessary evil for a contractor. Many clients prefer to go through headhunters and will not hire a contractor directly. The key is to use headhunters only to hunt for contracts. After a few years the contractor should have a good idea which headhunters could be trusted. Finally, if you are really good at what you do, the offers and opportunities will always be there... If I found myself in the guy in the article's shoe, I probably will hand in my 2 weeks notice ASAP and move on. Contracting is the best thing that ever happened to me work wise... pay is good, there are substantial tax savings (here in Canada), and I get to make more friends hopping from one project to the next. Learning is also accelerated as I get to see what technologies and patterns works and what does not. Clients also get their money's worth from hiring me as I bring invaluable "outsider" experience to the team.

JohnMcGrew
JohnMcGrew

It sounds like this guy has signed up for all the disadvantages of being "independent", but gets none of the benefits of being an "employee", which it sounds like he really is. Since he gets a W-2, he's not really an "independent contractor", but just a low-grade rented employee. He sure is being treated that way. Also keep in mind the only reason these kinds of condition exist is because there are enough people out there willing to tolerate them. If you allow yourself to be treated like that, you will be treated like that. One of the lessons of "contracting" it took me too long to learn was about respect; both "self" and respect from customers. Long version short: Customers who do not respect you, your time, or your bill are not worth the trouble.

T.Walpole
T.Walpole

Exactly Mabrick. The guy in the story was not a contractor but an employee of a contracting company. I did this once early in my career and when I found out what the client was paying the contracting company for my work and compared it to what I was actually getting, I vowed never again.

I_Borg
I_Borg

Follow this guys advise, we really are in control of this industry as long as the material keeps coming in very large tomes that no one want to read but us. Knowlege is power!

ITexperts
ITexperts

yeah it does suck but atleast you dont get a reseme that u got fired , just that the contract expired or ended that the pro , but the rest is cons

kino.mondesir
kino.mondesir

I have been on many interviews for jobs in which I have been asked that very same question. Why have you been on so many contracts. I couldn't contain my frustration. So I snapped and stated that the very job I was applying for was a contract position. Most companies do not treat IT workers with respect but then again we do not demand it. The problem is that too many people have entered the field trying to make a fast buck and have ruined the profession for all of us that take it serious. I can no longer take this profession seriously. I have rejected new contracts and I'm pursuing a degree in Nursing. I figure that if I spend one tenth of the time training for a new role that I will have reaped the reward. We are educated professions and should have no problem retraining for something else right.

Shellbot
Shellbot

That type of stuff is the nature of the game. I'm a contractor.. Do you not do the math and negotiate your rate? Sorry mate, but by contracting you are self employed technically, and its up to YOU to look after yourself. Ok, yes, I know one or two people who took a job contracting recently and they thought "wow..that much money per day!!!!!!!!!" and snapped it up..only to then realise, they didn't do the math. When I'm negotiating a rate, I take whats on offer and work it out to what I'll make per month / per year. I then minus 20 days pay for holidays. Then 7 days for illness, then 3 days for Dr/dentist. I do the sums and see what I come up with, and if its acceptable..I accept, or i negotiate. I know January's going to be a lean month..time off at xmas..but I prepared and put a few bucks away, plus have 2 months of expenses to claim to soften the taxes I'll be paying..

half
half

A lot depends on the contract wording, I work "as and when required", If that is weekends I get penal rates. If it over 6 months at a time annual leave is added, There is no sick leave at all. I have been on the same wording for 5 years now to the same company, They have even given me cost of living adjustments to the rate every year, Most of my work is done Friday to Tuesday, and they pay airfares or rental vehicles. And I get paid door to door I,m not complaining. Its all in the contract you hammer out

johan
johan

Hi Guys I am in the same boat although my picture looks different. For me it is also the normal now work no pay. However I have negotiated my contract so that I only need to put in 5 hours a day. The rest is over time pay. This is fantastic for i start at 7am and leaves at 12pm. I get more time with my family to do sprots etc. Here I think is the difficult part for some. I made this decision for myself and therefore decided the time aspect was more important than the money aspect. Moneywise i am doing okay and can pay all my bills and am quite happy. I have 3 friends that do exactly what I do, however they complain all the time as well. I think it has to do with the fact they work 9 hours everyday also with no work no pay policy. What they do is they make good money and live their lifestyle accordingly. Fancy cars houses and fancy techno gadgets. When December comes they also complain for they can't afford a holiday and then they blame the employer. I think that is unfair because they were aware of the terms and conditions when they signed the contract. Why complain now? So personally i think the contracting game can be great, depedning on your goals and whether you are willing to budget a little and swap the Porchse for a Volkswagen.

omnknt232006
omnknt232006

What he needs to do is take some time for himself and determine exactly what he wants and expects in a job and then find a job that meets his criteria. All this whining about a bad economy or no holidays is not getting you anywhere. Beggars can't be choosers so if your not willing to do what it takes to pursue your dream job then don't complain when you settle for less.

David.Williams
David.Williams

The economy stinks in Michigan. It helps tremendously if you are available nationwide.

pdavila
pdavila

Yes, it is easier to do this lifestyle if you are an independent contractor. Stay away from W2 stuff if you can. The trick is to learn to run a business, which is essentially what you are as a consultant. Manage your cash flow. That is, keep your expenses to a minimum. For example, my RV is used and purchased for $5000. It does have new tires and I keep it well maintained, since that is essential. The wrangler is new, but I bought the cheapest model. That is the only toy I own. Traveling all over the US is the best adventure out there. But, it is not for everyone. To find out if it is something for you, try renting a Motorhome for a week and see if you would like it.

Shellbot
Shellbot

I've only been seriously contracting a short while..but I'm loving it!! I don't ask for a day off..I inform them I won't be in the office.. Last month they came to me and asked how many days I was taking off for xmas... I'm expected to work a reasonable amount of days and generally work the hours thier staff do..

makkh
makkh

U're damn right on the bright side of contractor. For the dude in the e-mail, if U really got what the market looking for, follow cyclo's advice.

T.Walpole
T.Walpole

Shellbot, these guys are just employees of the contractor who offers their people no benefits, only an hourly rate which is probably around half of what the actual rate paid by the client. They are not contractors. They are on w-2, which means in the eyes of the IRS they are employees. I'm not sure if they even have the right to claim expenses against income. It's like getting all the disadvantages related to being on contract without getting any of the advantages. Unfortunately, in today's environment these contracting companies are probably overwhelmed with applications from desperate people willing to be exploited because of their circumstances. It's a shame.

omnknt232006
omnknt232006

I meant this as a comment to the general blog post not as one to vulture. I clicked in the wrong place - sorry.

pdavila
pdavila

David, That is it, exactly. IMO, the present problems with the economy will not change in Michigan and other places for a long long time. Half the battle is to realize that the whole idea is to survive the current environment until things do recover. If things don't change for another 20 years, well, then my gypsy ways should continue to put food on the table. And, it is a great way to live, at least for me. I think that anyone with a mortgage and realestate taxes to pay is in a bad situation nowadays. If I'm right, and the world goes into an economic Depression, the best way to survive it will be with minimal debt. Those with a mobile lifestyle should have an easier time of surviving the current reality.

oschmid14
oschmid14

In a W2 engagement, you are a employee, even if the engagement is time limited. You can nor deduct any expenses (traveling, meals, office material, fixed assets, ... ) against your taxes. I usually refuse to go on W2. It is preferably corp-to-corp or as second preference 1099. Advantage of W2 is usually you are on the same pay-roll schedule as the rest of the company, so you get paid more frequently and you will not have to worry about any taxes, where in a corp-to-corp or 1099, you have to bill your client and then have negotiated payment terms; meaning you are getting paid less frequently and are yourself responsible for any taxes to be paid. Both have its advantages and disadvantages and everybody has to know what they are more comfortable with in the long run.

Shellbot
Shellbot

Well, I guess it wouldn't be a job I'd accept willingly..only in desperation. We have that type over here as well, the company hire you and then send you out to work at a clients place of business..however, the company employing you generally pays you a salary. We generaly refer to them as "Consultants". "Contracting" here is more about looking after yourself. An current agent I'm with submits me for contact positions, takes care of the contracts and with this job, I invoice the agent who in turn invoices the company I'm working with and then pays me when they get paid. This business of working for a company who then "wh0res" you out wherever and doesn't pay you proper is a disgrace. Get your expereince and move on when ya can...thats all i can say

Editor's Picks