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Video: Words you should leave off your resume

Here are some words that can become meaningless when used in the context of a resume.

Some words are perfectly fine when used in daily conversation. But there are some that, when used in a resume or cover letter, become completely useless. Take a look at the words your resume could do without.

About

Toni Bowers is Managing Editor of TechRepublic and is the award-winning blogger of the Career Management blog. She has edited newsletters, books, and web sites pertaining to software, IT career, and IT management issues.

14 comments
jengels
jengels

Most who read this are professionals who have been in the field for a few years. This message really sounds like it is for high school kids. Don't waste your time or even your brain cells for that matter on telling people not to use the words Awesome and cool on their resume. If they are doing that past the age of 22 then they definitley are not likely reading this or any other publications on resumes.

Englebert
Englebert

is one phrase I dislike in a Resume. What does this mean ? However, after seeing some ads asking for this particular skill, I can understand why applicants list it; meaningless as it may be.

snaik95899
snaik95899

Most of you guys sound like a bunch of self important douchebags. Yes, there are definitely things to leave off a resume. Unfortunately at least in this country, there are NO STANDARDS for resumes. It's great that this site would post such great information for people. Every one you talk to at different companies have different ideas of what should be on a resume. Of course the only cardinal rule is to have no grammar or blatant spelling mistakes. As as for the guys making fun of the hiring candidates, I hope you lose your jobs. Being unemployed is not a joke.

rhino777
rhino777

"As as for the guys making fun of the hiring candidates, I hope you loose your jobs. Being unemployed is not a joke." As opposed to tightening their jobs?

Dr Dij
Dr Dij

maybe this poster will 'loose' his job too! And he's the one that hates spelling misteaks [sic] (my california grown organic soy milk just spurted out thru my nose, possibly onto some primo greens for medical use only :)

santeewelding
santeewelding

Why I ask is that, in going through several of the responses with a fine comb, I come up with a mess of the very dingleberries you identify. And, as to holding the door for the doughnuts, that [i]would[/i] catch my employing eye. Tells me they know their place in the presence of the powerful, unlike some here.

richlan421
richlan421

Lets get real here. If there are still some idiots out there using this stuff on their resumes, they are not on here. A better use of space for something like this could be on anyone of the following and have contributed more: proper formating for digital resume submission or hard copy submission, grammar & spelling errors, 1 page vs 2 page resumes and when to use them, use of action words and numbers in your work history descriptions, and/or a better "Words to Not Use On Your Resume List". I do wish to thank and commend Toni for her initiative and obvious sincere desire to help, but would ask her to please keep any future postings a little more realistic to the forum in which it is being posted. That there may be someone out there who is guilty of what you described is possible, but definitely in the minority. Instead consider subjects and content that will enlighten and embolden the vast majority.

BOBBYBEA
BOBBYBEA

what a dumb idea, waste of time, and In Box space! I tried to vote it down, but it was given a thumbs up, so please discount at least one of them...

jboughton29
jboughton29

C'mon, we all know that we've used the word "Wicked-cool" and "Smoking-awesome" on our resumes!! ...uhh,.. right? Anybody? In all seriousness, yes, it would be tragic if a resume ever came across my desk using the words "awesome" or "cool" but I still must say my pet-peeve to this day is poor spelling! When a glaring spelling mistake jumps out at me, it really sticks with me and makes it hard for me to focus on the rest of the resume - even if it was a quality candidate!

Donmecca
Donmecca

I can't even believe someone would even put words such as this on their resume. I have a technical resume and it has done wonders for me.....

jonrosen
jonrosen

There are people who need to be told this list of what not to say? I know I don't write the 'best' resumes, but I've done fairly well with landing some solid jobs in the past. But I know I've never done anything that idiotic on my resumes. I can fully agree with her, that if I was the one going through the resumes and saw any of that, they'd instantly go into the trash.

jmarkovic32
jmarkovic32

We have positions open and my boss and I frequently make fun of the hotmama99@gmail.com e-mails that we get resumes from. It makes it very easy to weedout the people who need any job from people who want the job.

PSK_
PSK_

Oh yes. People can craft a good resume and forget that their email address of ima_crack_head@aol.com may draw some unwanted attention.

Hobbesl
Hobbesl

Careful use of a superlative word can convey enthusiasm for a position or project. ?I contributed to? should be closely followed with how. For example: ?I contributed to the Mars Rover Project by designing a fabulous new interface for joystick remote control that made control more intuitive and natural for the operator and provided a 50% improvement in accuracy.? Doesn?t that sound better than ?designed new joystick interface for Mars Rover Project?? Don?t go overboard but there?s nothing wrong with letting your enthusiasm and energy show through.

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