IT Employment

What should I do: Former employer lying to prospective employers

What do you do if a former employer is telling prospective employers lies about your time at his company? This is what is happening to a TechRepublic member.

What do you do if a former employer is telling prospective employers lies about your time at his company? This is what is happening to a TechRepublic member.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

I've blogged before about why you should never trash a former employer during an interview with a prospective employer. But what do you do if a behavior of that former employer could negatively impact your future prospects? A TechRepublic member e-mailed me with a scenario that could break the rules. Here's what he had to say:

"I was happy to find your group. I need a little advice. I was fired from my last position by a manager whose favorite hobby is destroying peoples' reputations. My former manager fired 11 people in 4 years for various reasons when it was just the manager's hobby.

I was able to work for this person for four years and survive the mauling until recently. I had not left the job because I am financially supporting an elderly parent.

I was told by one of my references that he had been called by my former manager and told I was fired for theft. Little did the manager know we went to high school together and my friend knew better. Yes, I have gotten the EEOC involved.

The real question is how do I handle the interview or hiring process? Do I offer the information that I was fired or wait until the background check comes back and then I am fired a second time (for lying on job application)?"

So, can you go ahead and talk about a former employee in a bad light if he is, as in this case, a raving crackpot? My first inclination was to tell the guy who wrote that he should explain upfront in the interviews only about his former manager's accusations and the EEOC suit he has filed. That way, he is alerting the interviewer to the information he might get from his old boss, as well as showing that he objects to the charges enough to file a formal suit against the guy.

But then I thought, what if they don't even call his references? Has he exposed himself as having this extra "baggage" when he didn't have to?

References are a really tricky thing. It would be great if he could find someone else in the organization who could verify the dates of his employment, which is really all they should be doing anyway.

I'm sure the bad-reference sabotage happens more often than people know. There are people out there who take it personally when you leave a position; they act like spurned lovers and try to keep you from moving on with your life. It may be worth having someone you trust call in to get a "reference" for you to see what he is told.

Got a career scenario of your own? E-mail it to us here. We'll post it anonymously, and see what kind of feedback your peers have to offer.

About

Toni Bowers is Managing Editor of TechRepublic and is the award-winning blogger of the Career Management blog. She has edited newsletters, books, and web sites pertaining to software, IT career, and IT management issues.

46 comments
BigWazza
BigWazza

I got fired from a job years ago and through the union was (more or less) able to show it was unfair, I was treated unfairly, and HR failed to investigate the issue properly. After six weeks the company offered me a job on about half-pay somewhere else. I took it because I needed a job to pay bills, and was then treated like scum by my old boss, my new boss and the union. Apparently by accepting the job they took it to mean I accepted full guilt in the issue. It took me five years to get back into IT and another five to get the pay my predecessor was on when he left, even though I was doing a much better job. I have nowhere to go in my current job, and do so much more than my predecessor ever thought of. I can't see me moving up in the world without a great leap of faith from a prospective employer. Also, an old friend of mine knew a young adult having problems with a reference from an old employer's HR. My friend, posing as a prospective employer, rang for a reference and was told about the person being fired, due run-ins with the new manager. My friend asked "who is to blame - a person who has worked at the company for years and fitting in, or a new manager who fired him in less than six months of the job?" The response was "well if you put it that way..." I think I should have sought legal action, but I didn't want any new employer thinking "if something goes wrong, they will try and sue me", then not offer the job.

ackykaky
ackykaky

I wish I'd seen this post earlier. It's been 5 years since I left the company and I still haven't managed to get another job in IT. Three years ago, a recruiter friend of my son told me that I'd "exaggerated" my resume. I called a couple folks at the company I kept in contact with and asked them if they would get me some copies of project documents I'd worked on and they told me they'd been destroyed. I also contacted the on-site HR rep and got absolutely nowhere. If anybody has a suggestion as to what I should do at this late date, I'd sure appreciate it.

mikifinaz1
mikifinaz1

I know someone who jacked up an employer that did this using a lawyer.

Tessla11
Tessla11

I'm new to the Tech Field, attending Rutgers University to attain my Oracle/MS SQL dBase Developer Certificate. So I'm new, learning about the tech field. Be kind to me. :-p I'm an Executive Assistant and have had this suspicion about my former bosses. My last EVP was a maniac, he went through 6 assistants within 2 years and I was there for 6 months!! The controller told me that there is a pool [in their company] to see how long the "latest EA" will last. I am very tenacious so I wasn't going to quit. Some of the folks at that company were very passive-aggressive toward me...I have a BA in Psychology so it was disturbing to say the least when I recognized this behaviour. I know that being fired was a god-send but I always wonder what he says about me when the call comes to him. When he fired me he said that "we don't get along" but I don't think he was being honest, I have a very strong personality and am a decision maker. My EVP offered me a letter of recommendation, which never came even though I sent him an email to remind him; he always failed to follow through. I left a position after 7 years at another company; my VP was in shock when I gave him my resignation, as though I could not get a job anywhere else. He failed to recognize my contribution. He refused to change my job title when I pointed out to him that my job description changed drastically and my salary was not the median average for the Princeton area. I was paid ~$20k less than average. He made the environment intolerable to the point that I had to quit. He also transferred a lot of his personal feelings toward me that he had for his ex-wife...OMG, having a degree in Psychology suck sometimes. I often wonder what he says about me. The Universe works in wonderful ways though...this VP hired an incompetent woman and eventually "stood down" from his position for a lower one...I think it was to keep himself from being fired. Maybe he says good things about me since he realized that I was extremely competent after hiring the woman who was not. At least I like to think so...I still worry every time I have to put him as a reference though. The key is to get references that can attest to your character and performance if you don't have to give supervisor/manager references. Remember to always ask someone before using them as a reference.

HwyMan
HwyMan

Every HR department knows that former employers are only permitted to verify that you were employed by their organization and the dates you were employed. Any negative comments about you are off limits unless you specifically offered a person in that company as a personal reference and not as employment verification. If you listed a former supervisor/co-worker as a personal reference, you shot yourself in the foot. That gives them the right not to recommend you in order to protect their reputation.

loewenr
loewenr

One of the best ways to know what your former employers will say about you is to have them put it in writing. I mean, a lot of employers close up shop or move or change over staff - why don't you get them to write you a reference letter? That way you can create a porfolio of good work and references that can help you in the future and you'll know what your strengths are going into the interview.

TBone2k
TBone2k

I guess this may not always apply, but when I left a previous employer becuase of personal conflicts, I gave HR as the reference instead of my manager. HR is usally better trained to deal with these situations diplomatically.

Oz_Media
Oz_Media

Just use other references. When it comes to a reference from your last employer, there are a couple of ways around it if you absolutely MUST offer one. First, if you don't want to offer a reference. Say you were laid off due to personal differences. No matter how skilled you are or how experienced you may be, it is not such a bad thing to admit it was a bad fit. Not everyone fits every company, nor are you expected to. Explain that you had personal differences and didn't leave on the best of terms. In most cases this is not quite as detrimental as you may think, especially if you have past experience that sees beyondn that issue. Another way around it, if true, is to say that you feel you were dismissed unjustly. As a result you have sought out support of Employment Standards and don't wish for him to be contacted at this time. A way AROUND using him, use three other references, simply don' tlist him. If it comes up during an intrview, you can explain that there was animosity between you and you don't feel he will give you a fair evaluation based on performance, you can explain why but shouldn't use the same language you have used here. "a manager whose favorite hobby is destroying peoples??? reputations." That is making an insinuation and can be seen as you also trying to defame him, exactly what you accuse him of wrongly doing to you. I have had similar issues, for different reasons and when in an interview I just say, we had personal differences and just didn'y get along. Even if they call the employer anyway, they are at least expectign to hear somethign negative and will take it with a grain of salt. the other way around it is to get ANOTHER reference form someone else at the company. I was once suing an employer and didn't want them called, so I got a written letter from another manager in the company who also worked closely with me and it has never been questioned. there are ways around it wihthout the need to even use that reference, with the number of positions I've held, in many different industries (I move on when I'm bored or want to try a different trade)I have three or four references that I count on and the rest are irrelevant, not mentioned, not focused on. I have yet to have one come back and bite me, I have not lied, I have provided references and they stand up. Nobody can be expected to have a reference from every employer they work for. Legal avenues: While they will vary by state there are the same basic principals applied to each defamation case. If you have PROOF that you are being unfairly represented by him and it is definitely untrue, you can sue for character defamation. Defamation is false communication about a person that tends to hurts the person's reputation. The communication must be made to other people, not just to the person it's about. It can be spoken or written, or it can be a gesture. The two types of defamnation include (LIBEL) permanent, in the case or a newspaper article or such, and non-permanent (SLANDER), in the case of verbal or gestures that depreciate your value. If I defamed you on TR, it would be Libel, If I defamed you verbally it would be Slander. In this case it is slander and MUCH harder to seek comensation for than Libel. In order to sue for slander, you need to show a specific loss of income. So if a company that was going to offer you $100K/yr admits that they didn't hire you specifically based on what that employer has said, then the court can assess damages and award you accordingly. I've done it, and won it on mroe than one occasion, for both Libel and Slander, but slander is a tricky one indeed. However, if this is his 'practice' then make sure you do SOMETHING about it even if for the benefit of others.

MytonLopez
MytonLopez

1st off do not put someone as a reference who you think may say bad things about you. That is a DUMB thing to do. I would always call them 1st and let them know you are putting them down as a reference and let them know what you had said in the interview/application so they are aware and can prepare if needed. That would be more on the lines as a personal reference or co-worker type of reference that can judge your personality and or how you work with others and technical details of the job. 2nd if you don't have anyone than put down the HR's number because truthfully HR should be handling job verification anyways.

prosenjit11
prosenjit11

First OF ALL Hats OFF to the Toni for coming up Upfront on these topics. There are certain things which are important here on a prospective employee who resigns from an organisation or is forced to resign from an organisation. This is mostly because of two factors that either he or she was too good to make the life of his competitors miserable in the race for a Higher Position or he was not able to cope up with the pace and the Time frame to execute a particular task in the organisation. Most prominent is when Services companies or Product development organisations with their captives in INDIA promise on unrealistic committments on projects based on parameters resources and budget, most important the TIMEFRAME. For example if the Head OF Engineering is given the Tip that if a Release Cycle is made for a Product worth millions of dollars then he would be the VP within 3 months time. Thats It!!!. He goes down to the Project Manager pressuring him and then this goes to Software Developers and finally going beyond the methodologies of Project Management a Schedule is committed. Some say Oh! Oh! The Project Management tools, they can give the best and worst case scenario, but what about the realistic capabilities of the team. Now if an employee goes upfront trying to explain things he is then harrassed and quits the organisation for a better job. In such case the feedback is not going to be good. The prospective employer should be then informed by the employee to have a Conference Call with the Technical, HR and the previous employer where the employee should also be allowed to participate in the discussion knowing their honest feedback. Now again if someone has quit due to Office Politics then there is a different picture and in this case a Conference Call should be taken for that matter.

JackOfAllTech
JackOfAllTech

what that manager did is against the law and should be prosecuted and civilly sued.

JamesRL
JamesRL

People who will act like a prospective employer and call your reference list. In a case like this, I would talk to someone in HR of the company and get them to act as a "minimal" reference, where they can verify the dates of employment, titles and salary, and reason for leaving. I have also used references who were peers of my former boss, or people who have left the company but can attest to my work. James

TheChas
TheChas

In this case, you do need to be proactive and up front about the facts of your dismissal. I would not however state that the former manager made it a hobby to destroy people. In a factual tone, state the fact of the other 11 firings over the 4 years that you worked there, and mention that you are concerned that your former manager may have a vindictive nature. While trying to sue the former company may give you some satisfaction, avoid doing so unless you have some solid evidence and the cooperation of other former employees. Plus, if this manager is as vindictive as described, he may have created a case against you that you may find difficult to defend against. Keep in mind that the fact of suing a former employer will leave a question mark about you for any future employers. I worked for an employer that all of the local recruitment firms and many of the HR departments were fully aware of the antics and high turn-over rate. One of the best was the new manager that attended his first Monday morning staff meeting and did not come back after lunch. Chas

herman404
herman404

First of all, I have to say that I am not a lawyer, but after looking up a few definitions, it is pretty clear that your former employer has committed libel/slander against you and therefore liable for it. Your former manager made a statement which everyone knew to be false and spread this information with the intent to sabotage your future employment prospects. You may struggle to prove damages since you are now working for a friend who really didn't believe the false accusations against you. But this guy is clearly trying to sabotage you and needs to be stopped. Any legal experts have any ideas?

Ed Woychowsky
Ed Woychowsky

A number of newspapers and television stations assist people with problems and publish the entire process. You could always try that approach, because nothing makes cockroaches scurry like the light of day. Finally, because lawmakers are a lazy bunch it is not uncommon in the United States for there to be a ?we have English laws up until 1776? clause to be on the books. Because of this there are occasionally laws that were never repealed or rewritten. For example, some states don?t have laws expressly prohibiting dueling. Personally, I don't recommend dueling, but it may be possible to use one of these old laws to your advantage.

Oz_Media
Oz_Media

It would be civil if there was no difference between slander and libel defamation, which there is in teh USA. In this case it is libel defamation, a VERY hard case to persue and collect any damages on. They usually result in nothing, if you can find a lawyer to take it to begin with, especially in this case where he was hired anyway and suffered no tangible monetary loss. Better business beaureau or state employment standards practices are the best route, simply to warn of future offenses and help others in a similar position. US laws don't protect employees, they protect employers. While this is a similar issue in many other countries too, other countries have more labour standards in place that protect employees, making it easier to red flag a cretin like this and not have him repeat the offense. I am sure there are still state avenues where the company can be reported for future investigation/awareness though.

PMPsicle
PMPsicle

Slander is a violation of the law under both the English (common) and Napoleonic codes. Since that covers most of the world, most of the countries in the world allow for lawsuits over slander. The reference to EEEO means that a legal group has been involved but I would personally contact a solicitor/lawyer to explore my options.

mark.barlow
mark.barlow

This is not legal in the UK either. Most companies have become so wary of providing references that it is the norm these days to only get a factual reference with start date, finish date, position and final salary.

JoiseyBill
JoiseyBill

IANAL Many US States allow an employer to say things about former employees - like they were fired, and why - as long as there is no malice. How much malice / how much proof you need will vary. Since you were fired, your former boss can (probably) tell that to anyone who calls for a reference. The reason that your boss says you were fired .. well, if you were given a reason, and the boss is pretty consistent in telling the same reason(s).. then they seem within bounds. If you fight the original termination, or at least fight to change the official grounds of termination ( crude example - A. was accused of stealing, but all the company really knows is A's accounting paperwork was sloppy. They never charged or proved A. was stealing, but they can still say 'fired for failure to perform accounting duties'.) Again, you will probably need some professional help on this. The definitions and requirements can be technical and vary depending on the laws in the place where you live. Another angle might be the company's policies. If your old company is big enough, they probably have guidelines or policy on how to handle references. If your old boss is violating the company ploicy by giving out that info.. or by not just referring an inquiry to HR.. then you may have a way to deal with it. This is a precarious situation. There are a lot of ways that this can continue to hurt you. Do whatever you need to and get professional advice to work past this.

Oz_Media
Oz_Media

But I do come from a legal family and have attanded many such cases, as well as filed a few myself. You are right, proving Slander (the applicable defamation in this case) is a tough one. Libel is easy, slandere requries a definition of loss, as you duly noted. If you can prove that you lost income due to his comments, and also prove exactly how much income you've lost, you can recover the damages. In this case, where employment has been found regardless of the comments, there's not much you can do except make a report to your state's, employment standards branch to file a complaint. A lawyer will probably not jump on this one, there is no current case of defamation where a financial loss can be proven or recovered. He would probably direct you to file a more formal complaint on the employer for further investigation, a good idea if others suffer a similar fate. Again though, I'm not a lawyer, though I have seen this specific issue tried a few times as well as done it myself. I actually had an issue on TR where libel defamation took place, TR was extremely helpful in stopping it and removing the defamatory posts so that legal action (on the poster not TR) was not needed.

BFilmFan
BFilmFan

An attorney would have a field day with a case like this. Just so everyone is aware, in the state of Georgia as long as one party has knowledge that the conversation is being recorded, it is legal and admissible in court. So if you are the one looking for the evidence and recording, you aren't obligated to tell the other person that they are being recorded. It is always best to assume that you are being recorded and to not lie on the phone, as it can easily come back to haunt you. Not only could the former supervisor be sued, as well as the employer, the former employees could get together and potentially file a lawsuit based on the supervisor AND employer in creating a hostile work environment. And since most of these attorneys work on a commission basis, let them have their 33$ or half of whatever you get. It's more than in your pocket than the trashed reputation you currently have. I would also only be willing to settle for a letter of personal apology from the CEO/owner of the company officially drafted on company letter head. While you didn't mention it and I would never suggest it, it sounds like your ex-boss was a vindictive person that cheated on their taxes. I would call the IRS with your suspicions they were a tax cheat. It's the patriotic thing to do....

pwoodctfl
pwoodctfl

I agree with all of the above, but that doesn't help you in your next interview. If you had an employer prior to this employer, contact someone there and ask them if they would vouch for your behavior while employed there. You must include the employer in your work history, especially if there is a potential that you will be bonded or need a security clearance. They can overlook a vengeful, vicious employer, but they cannot overlook a material misstatement on your application for employment. Include in the interview your list of accomplishments like any other employer, but make a point to mention in the interview that you were terminated under a false accusation that the employer never pursued criminally and you are now pursuing civil action to restore your good name. (By the way....it is illegal in the extreme to suggest that the employee stole unless you have enough evidence to take to the police and the employee was tried and convicted of the crime.) You have more grounds to sue this employer than you may think. Even if you were fired for cause, you should file for unemployment benefits. This will force an outside agency to do an investigation and if the employer can produce no proof, will buck up your contention that the charge is untrue. If you are already receiving unemployment, then the employer is already admitting that you did no wrong, because you cannot get unemployment if you are terminated for cause. There will be a piece of paper at the unemployment office that your lawyer will LOVE. This is going to be a very expensive mistake on the employing company's part, especially if there is a pattern in the gender, race, religion, political affiliation, or age of the persons fired with prejudice.....and it won't be hard to find with 11 victims. You do not have to tolerate this, and should not to protect all others who will have to bear the brunt of such attacks. If you have any contact with the other victims of this bully, you may all want to go to the same lawyer....that will get your former employer's attention....FAST.

wolfshades
wolfshades

Someone else said here that it's unfair to sue the employer for the actions of the boss. I disagree. "The buck stops here" comes to mind: the company is ultimately responsible for the actions of its employees. Suing them gives them a "heads up" that something's wrong - something they need to fix. Why that idiot boss still has his job after firing 11 employees in such a short time is beyond me. Unless he's merely extending the already existing corporate culture (something I've seen in a few places). So...no tears here for the company. They need to be on top of this kind of thing.

GSG
GSG

At least have a lawyer send a Cease and Desist letter. It may be enough to scare the guy. If nothing else, then it makes him aware that the former employee knows what's going on.

jblalock4
jblalock4

I had a friend who this happened to and she had an attorney draft a letter to the former employer stating that if the behavior continued there would be a lawsuit or something of that nature. It worked. And of course cc the higher ups if there are any.

JamesRL
JamesRL

Not only do you have older laws, but more importantly, you have common law, which is the law created through judges decisions, in cases where no legislation exists. In common law, if no precedents exist in your own country , you can search for them in other common law countries with similar legal systems. My wife as a law clerk did search UK and US cases for precedents. James

Oz_Media
Oz_Media

Libel defamation, very different. Whiel you are right in that some countries, The British Commonwealth, US and a couple of others, separate libel and slander others do not and they see all cases under civil law as simply defamation.

sionus
sionus

If you are fired and they have proof of what you did wrong to get fired they can tell that to prospective employeers. The reason that most companies only give out a small amount of information is because they either don't have the proof to back up any claims or they don't want to even risk a lawsuit.

pwoodctfl
pwoodctfl

If the employee can prove that even one prospective employer declined to hire based on information obtained from his boss....the employee wins.....the value of the job from the time he was not hired until he finds another job. That is the financial loss. In addition, if he gets a wrongful termination decision, he may have an option to return to his origninal job or accept back pay....again until he finds another job. There is no difficulty in determining a financial loss when income is involved. The difficulty may come in finding an employer who is willing to state in writing that they decline to hire based on information received from a former employer. (If the heard the information and hired you anyway, there is no financial loss for slander.)

cfbandit
cfbandit

I would agree with BFilmFan. Sue, and make sure one of the key settlement items is a letter of personal apology from the CEO/Owner. The next thing to do would be to have a friend call and do a "reference check" for a "position" that you were looking at. See what the company offers up. If they go back and give you a minimal reference, all is well. If not, then I would mention that you were falsely accused in your future interviews and give the interviewer a copy of the CEO's letter. Its shameful what some companies let their people get away with. I've been in the same situation - a former employer telling people I stole money, bullied people and was a horrible person to work with. Luckily, a C&D was all it took for me to stop that problem. A friend of mine also told me that you can have a company do a reference check for you and you can include that when doing future interviews. Good luck to the poor guy!

NotSoChiGuy
NotSoChiGuy

...bear in mind, this was over a decade ago, so things could have changed (since we all know how progressive government agencies such as the IRS are), but I had an interesting experience once in calling the IRS to report a tax cheat. Long story short, a guy I knew (who worked for H & R Block) claimed on his taxes his kids (wasn't supposed to do that due to joint-parenting agreement), his girlfriend's kids (she was still married to a dude in jail), and...get this...his two dogs. He also claimed some really bogus itemized deductions. I reported the guy (Disclaimer: he had done me wrong a few times, and I was biding my time until the right opportunity presented itself for retribution that was bad karma-free). I was told by the IRS agent on the phone that it "wasn't enough money for them to concern themselves with". :0 So, the lesson learned: if you want to get someone, shove a J through their car window, and call in an anonymous tip that you saw them dealing near a school (j/k Mr. Government Man that may be reading this). ]:) As for the boss in question in the original post, this would definitely be a lawyer's dream case. In Illinois, not only can you sue the former company, but you can also sue the supervisor directly...double your windfall, double your (and the lawyer's) pleasure, double your fun! Can't believe anyone would be dumb enough to actually say something like that when prompted by a stranger. Sheesh!

zhenchyld
zhenchyld

I agree with pwoods. Sounds like you've got a pretty strong case - get them suckas, or at least leverage what you have to get your old boss to keep his mouth shut (or get him fired)

BlueKnight
BlueKnight

Keep the EEOC suit going and stay on top of it. Having an attorney write a very menacing letter is an excellent idea, and I would recommend it as well. Be sure to keep a copy for your files. Aside from that, tell the truth on applications and during interviews. You don't have to go into detail until the proper time during an interview or such, but be sure to disclose the fact. I don't know if the victim worked in the public sector or not, but if so, and especially if having anything to do with law enforcement, you'd better tell the truth. Otherwise, the first hint of dishonesty will terminate a background investigation and you're done.

Fregeus
Fregeus

Now, I am not sure how it works in the states, but here in Quebec, a prospective employer is not allowed to get references from someone without your proper approval before hand. If this information was not solicited (ie: the ex-employer called his friend and not the other way around) then it becomes liable, regardless if it's true or not. TCB

Dr Dij
Dr Dij

my wife watches it, Mad Men! all american drivel. Everyone thinks the 'old days' were so great. They're stabbing each other in the backs, not letting the gals do anything much, and cheating on everyone.

Dr Dij
Dr Dij

That happened out here. Wife was cheating on hubby, who was an all american boy scout type teacher. They put drugs and gun in his car outside school then called police several times. End result the police didn't believe the teacher was guilty and arrested wife who was a meth freak and boyfriend. BTW, the drugs were not MJ. That could garner you a small fine here in CA, but more serious stuff law wise.

pwoodctfl
pwoodctfl

Eleven terminations in four years and they do not know what is going on....give me a break.....

ryumaou@hotmail.com
ryumaou@hotmail.com

Actually, it's the other way around. Slander, which is usually not in written form, is more difficult. Libel usually involves something written and possibly published that is defamatory, and is easier to prosecute because there is actual physical evidence. Though, both are far more difficult than people suppose. Not that I'm a lawyer or anything, but I had an ugly divorce where it came up. And, I sure wouldn't recommend doing anything legally shady, no matter how local authorities feel about it, as an act of revenge, since that kind of thing backfires all too often!

BFilmFan
BFilmFan

I grew up in an age where companies treated people well. Those days are over. Most companies treat their employees like slaves or at best, serfs. Most of the companies with problem managers are well aware of the issue and don't take action as it is easier to simply acknowledge that most people will not take them to court. I've seen the issue play out at some high-levels that when legal and HR finally did take action, millions of dollars were being discussed as settlements and people lost jobs, but the company continued the line "We never knew.." I've never sued a former employer for making false statements about me, but I've never experienced that issue. I think most of them realize that I am a good ol' Jewish boy from the South and are afraid that I will show up with about 300 of my heavily tatooed and seldom washed friends on their motorcycles for some righteous discussions on why you should always tell the truth. :)

lewisd3
lewisd3

Go for whatis right, stand up for your self, but don't go overboard.

lewisd3
lewisd3

I have a big problem with the comment about doubling your money by sueing the employer as well. Rmember that the employer may not be aware of the jerks's activities. Sueing the company may put more $ in your pocket and I don't thik there is a lawyer out there who would pass up the chance. As they say, sue everybody and go for the one with the deepest pockets, but it helps to destroy the working enviroment It drives up the end product prices because the emmployer will just pass it on to the customers. I have some experience with other countries and many of the cases that we see in court or companies settle out of court for would never even be heard over there. United States is just TOO sue happy. I personally know people who almost make a living out of it. Be realistic.

Oz_Media
Oz_Media

Shall I leave my window cracked open? :D Sorry, its always amusing to see how it is such a horrendous offense in the US. In Canada you would be told not to call 9/11 with such information as it wastes their resources and time. There's no hope in hell the RCMP would attend such a call, unless the issue of stalking the children was put forth. I'd also check your Illinois laws once again, it usually isn't nearly as easy to sue for libel damages as you may think. Slander yes, libel no.

Dr Dij
Dr Dij

the unemployment agency is used to this happening. They are likely to give you unemployment anyway, if you let them know the reason.

Dr Dij
Dr Dij

I see most applications say "Reason for leaving", not "were you fired?" So if you say something like "I left because I had completed major projects and looking for new challenges", or ANYTHING but then this will never come up as mentioned, as they are usually simply verifying employment records. Give them HR person's #. Obviously this boss was not put down as a reference. Other people who have a better relation with are obvious choice for refs. My wife left company that was horrid to her. She is a bit sensitive, it was only typical stuff, nothing major. She told both the company she quit and prospective employers that it was too far a drive with rising gas prices. (it was 37 miles each way, she had to visit a mall and have dinner then leave there at 7 with an hour drive home). Now only 4 miles away, much better.