IT Employment

When it's OK to quit your job

It seems out of the question to talk about walking away from a job in these uncertain economic times. But there are times when walking away might be the best thing to do.

It seems out of the question to talk about walking away from a job in these uncertain economic times. But there are times when walking away might be the best thing to do.

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Bear with me while I share a personal story that prompted the idea for this blog. My teenaged son has a part-time job in shipping and receiving with a national home and building supply store. At first he loved his job. But gradually, the managers began to ask him to do more and more work, sometimes outside of his assigned department. Now he is loading the shelves, driving the forklift, helping customers find everything they need for projects, and then loading the supplies into their vehicles. But it seems the more he does, the fewer words of encouragement he receives from management. In fact, they take every opportunity to point out any small area where he is falling short. Of course, if he sucked at his job, they wouldn't be increasing his duties. My guess is that they're very comfortable taking him for granted.

OK, so far the story is pretty typical of every entry-level retail position in the world. But the kicker is that this particular chain practices the cringe-inducing ritual of gathering the employees in an inane cheer during each shift. Seriously, they gather all the employees and someone leads off a team cheer -- "Give me an H!" My son is enough like me to bristle at this moronic attempt at forced company spirit. But to have do a cheer for a company that is otherwise treating you with contempt is like having someone slap you and then make you give them a hug. One of the managers has learned of my son's discomfort with the whole deal and now is on a mission to get him to actually lead one of the cheers, going so far as to page him on the loud speaker to come up front.

As a parent, I want to teach my son that he has to stick out the hard times. I want him to understand that there's a 90% chance that for the rest of his working life, he will be working alongside someone who is a jerk. There's a 50% chance that he will work for people who make twice as much money as he does but who have half the intelligence or drive. It's a fact of life.

But there are a couple of positions I take as his parent. One of the most primal ones tells me that I should walk into that store and chase all the managers around with a running weed-eater. Of course, I'm afraid of doing jail time so that's out of the question. The other option is to tell him to quit his job. First, he's a young man with no financial obligations. If you can't quit a job over principles at that point in your life, when can you? Second, the management behavior he is being subjected to is psychologically damaging in my opinion. If he endures that stuff at this age, will his threshold for abuse and humiliation increase until he ends up a modern-day Bob Cratchit?

I abruptly quit only one job in my life. I was 22, it was the middle of the day, and I just went into my boss's office and quit. Something had happened that just exceeded my tolerance level, and I couldn't take it anymore. I was unemployed for six months after that, and I've never done it again. But if I had it to do over, I would. Sometimes what you give up in a job is bigger than what you get from it.

About

Toni Bowers is Managing Editor of TechRepublic and is the award-winning blogger of the Career Management blog. She has edited newsletters, books, and web sites pertaining to software, IT career, and IT management issues.

114 comments
whoknows11
whoknows11

I am so glad that I came across this post. I totally agree with this comment. "If you can?t quit a job over principles at that point in your life, when can you?" I believe, unless you are totally burdened with financial responsibility, it is ok to leave a job at any point of your life. Peace of mind & dignity are worth more than money at any given time.

roleat
roleat

I recently quit my job due to reasons similar to the story above. My employers took my skills for granted and mistreated me, as a person that is unacceptable. As a young family-less individual, money can be made elsewhere.

jck
jck

a) I'd tell my child that they can't force you to lead cheers. That's not part of your assigned duties, and in no way would be a "natural" part of a position in any home improvement store...even management who thinks it's uplifting to cheer on your abusers. b) Weedeater? I'd take in a chainsaw or a 2x4 and bring down some country-style whoop-ass like a hillbilly Jason from the Friday the 13th movies. c) I only ever left a job on the same day as I decided to quit. Always gave notice of 2 weeks, including that one. But, my manager decided that it was just best if I was too stressed that I should leave. I still wrote the 2 week notice letter, and that way if he told me to leave they still had to pay me for 2 weeks pay because they opted out of having me for that 2 weeks. But yeah, that's BS. If they call him up and he doesn't want to do it, then either tell him to say "no thank you" to them...or have him make your his own cheer like: That's alright That's okay Everyone quits here Anyway You need brains You need luck Your cheer skills They really...are bad. :^0 GO TONI!!! ;)

Triathlete1981
Triathlete1981

Toni, I usually enjoy your posts, and this one is no different. As parents, we want to instill certain principles in our children, including work ethics and independence. When we let them go, all we can hope is that they make the right decision, and since they're our children, yes, we want to go after their assailants with a weed whacker. Lol. Sounds like your son had a great work ethic, despite managerial abuse. I understand how you wanted him to stick through the tough times, but to do that simply for the sake of sticking through is nonsensical. At that age, people are very impressionable and start to make decisions that affect their future and how they will be as adults. He had a great work ethic but more importantly stood up for himself. He found he was unhappy and did something about it. Good post.

KPMunn
KPMunn

Been There, Done That... Would do it again, in a heartbeat. I am seriously considering learning enough Chinese to tell my "Boss" to "Take this job..." He critises my written and spoken English, and I was born in London (UK)... Of course, he was born outside the "Normally" English speaking world, but believes his English is perfect...

Anita Y. Mathis
Anita Y. Mathis

Sometimes the grass just looks greener on the other side and you don't see all the brown spots until you get there. That can happen when someone's running away from one job into the arms of another. But when you can't take it anymore, you just can't take it anymore.

tom.m.weeks
tom.m.weeks

I quit my job in a similar situation about a year ago. When I first joined the company I was being given very good feedback. I had a temporary position and was hired on full time within a couple months. Almost a year later I was constantly being asked to do more and more. It seemed the harder I tried the more my company demanded of me. I quit and I still think it was one of the better decisions I've made.

richard.choi
richard.choi

I agree to some extent that when you have to quit you have to quit however I have always been a true believer that you must leave on good terms so not to burn any bridges. I also think as far as working goes the company is always going to try and get as much out of us as possible, it is fair play as long as you get something back, when the benifit is just with the employer then it should be time to leave.

TX_Techie
TX_Techie

I agree with Toni, if he were my son,I would tell him to start looking for a new job but don't quit that one just yet. In my employment history, I have quit and been fired from a few positions and I feel that when you reach the point that the only thing you get from your job is a pay check, it is time to move up or move out. There is nothing worse than to just hate a place that you have to spend 40+ hours a week in. Also, if he contiunes to endure this treatment, his company spirit will be broken (dispite all the cheers in the world) and his job preformance will suffer, thus opening the door for TERMINATION. If he leaves before that happends, he can claim that the job was not challenging enough and may even end up makeing more cash.

Photogenic Memory
Photogenic Memory

Hi Toni. I have had many jobs over the years. I quit quite a few of them. I remember one in particular was painful because I loved the work just not the boss. Life goes on. Great article! I've worked mostly low paying jobs that always ask for more and more. The people that manage are always some prick(s) who couldn't make it some place else and is stuck with it. It's a power play. Tell your son to put that into perspective and encourage him to go to school so he doesn't have to work these types of jobs in his mid 30's like me.b Peace.

dncaley
dncaley

When you are working at one of the companies rated by Fortune Magazine as one of the best places in America to work, and your manager is making the whole team feel like it is the worst job you ever had. When a colleague is on extended leave for Post Traumatic Stress Syndrome. When your successes are credited to someone else, and someone elses failures are credited to you. All of this is true. I go out, but it is still going on there today. The team lives in fear as jobs have been scarce in the region for years.

peperpm
peperpm

A friend of mine used to work at a warehouse company and told me stories of horrible employee treatment. My theory of this is the store is now built with employees with high tolerances for abuse, get shifts and vacations moved, and a much wider responsible load. They also pushed part time employees to about 35 hours. IMO this policy creates a high employee turnover rate. Fresh, low skilled, low paid employees, coupled with a lack of benefits for part-timers seems to increase overall profits, but I never got close enough to see why, or on the other side, how long term employees who tolerate this fare.

dmkruse27
dmkruse27

I have walked away from several jobs in my lifetime. It is unfortunate that we as a society have indebted ourselves to such a degree that we are unable to walk away from degrading work situations. The slap in the face/hug analogy is correct. Employers know that employees won't stand up or walk out when they are mistreated. Employees just keep drinking the Kool Aid.

rita
rita

I applaud Toni's recognition of the emotional impact of such situations. I work with many people, recently laid off, who still talk about the psychological stress they experienced. One client who left on her own because of the lack of respect for her work (and she's no slacker) still feels tension throughout her body whenever she recalls he previous work situation. Her self-confidence has been restored - without a job - she feels better about herself, her capabilities and her life. Go figure!

kowalskilee
kowalskilee

Before quitting, your son could simply ask his manager straight out "Why do you keep giving me more tasks to do, showing that you value my work, and never compliment what I do?" And see what the manager says. Doing this would give him insight into personalities of the managers that he can use throughout his whole life. Knowledge is power. And then quit.

Waine.Greenway
Waine.Greenway

I quit when 18 as i disagreed with my boss over the addition of 'reworked' pastry, I was not prepared to make inferior product. Therefore i walked at 6am after a couple of hours work (had worked there 2 years full time as well as 2 years part time). On arrival home my parents gave me the local paper to find another job. I've now worked hard for nearly 17 years with my current company and earned myself a decent career in IT. Had i not walked that day i'd probably still be stuck there!

The Old Man
The Old Man

I really enjoy reading your blogs and for the most part, agree with them. In this one, as a parent, I'd recommend one thing. Recommend he get another job before quitting. Being unemployed is just not an option for our children. Letting them know that it's ok is not ok!

kev.gould
kev.gould

We should all be teenagers with no financial obligations. I can't beleive I wasted my time reading this blog. Thought it might be useful. IT WAS NOT.

ccadman
ccadman

I worked for Wal-Mart for 7 years and endured the same crap as your son. I hated every minute of it but had to deal as I was providing for a family in a small rural town. NEVER AGAIN will I subject myself to such BS

reisen55
reisen55

I served eight months with a hospital network in support of computers and it damn near made me a patient of the place. Worst job ever and at the end I was dreading, DREADING, getting on the train to go to this shop from hell. Professionally, worst network EVER - virus, malware, porn was rampant. 30 computers simply stolen froma locked room. Understaffed on IT support and lots of EMERGENCY TICKETS every day. Since this was outsourced too, there were endless rules and procedures. And the end users were PATIENTS, people in hospital beds wired up and doctors could not get to their data because the systems were soooooo fouled up. We would GHOST a system infected and a few days later it all came back in again. I am convinced I had a nervous breakdown here and while I did not quit, I was damn glad they fired me.

Too Old For IT
Too Old For IT

I was working for a guy who not only owned the company, but the Higher Moral Ground as well. After 12 months of his non-too-subtle mixing of The One true Religion and the workplace, I had every known symptom of heart failure going, except I had arteries and veins as clean as a whistle. When he took offense to the cardiologists diagnosis of "definite signs of workplace stress" and fired me, I was out of the IT field for 4 months. However, in only two months, all the aforesaid symptoms of heart failure were gone. Go figure. And the truth is that nearly 90% of the time you will work for someone who has half the intelligence and half the drive, but has kissed @$$ enough to make him "irreplaceable and highly compensated". Or s/he has the pictures for the company picnic in a vault in Switzerland. Either way.

Oz_Media
Oz_Media

I didn't realize you were my mum. Beth, first of all good call refraining on the weedeater, temptation does get the best of us sometimes. Secondly, I think you have it pegged. He's young and free to learn these things without worry about financial repercussions. Positive: He picked up valuable work experience and learned what its like to be the lackie at work, or a young person, same thing. Though he will have to realize that in order to get where he wants, he'll have to work crappy jobs and be treated like an a$$hole, it builds character anyway and it teaches kids that work is, well....work. If it was fun, they wouldn' tcall it work and you wouldn't get paid for it. Of course that doesn't mean, take abuse. There's a certain amount yuo have to deal with, and unlike school, the teacher doesn't always give you a gold star and an extra 15 minutes for recess when you do good, don't expect recognition, you can earn it and you may deserve it, but certainly never expect it. However, when your successes and achievements at work go unrecognized and another's are praised, you need to do somethign about it. It's okay, we've all done it, in fact I quit work when I was younger (twice at different companies)because they would't give me an extre day for a campign weekend. "Fine, I'm going camping, you find an employee on Monday and I'll find a new job." I actually pushed to get fired once for the same reason, except I needed drinkign money so I made sure I was fired and didn't have to quit. In BC, if you are fired on the spot, you MUST be paid on the spot too, including any vacation pay, or else they owe you interest when they do pay you. I've won out more than once being aware of that clause. Just don't let him become a pansy about it and quit every time he is laid into or asked to do work he does not feel is his job. We all have to take on added responsibility, especially these days, and must expand our acceptable tasks in order to rmain valuable to our employers. In his case I don't see it as a principals issues that much, they probably weren't THAT bad, though are always made out to be. I'm sure that even as a top worker, they still had issues with him or his attitude, they always do. But as you say, he's young, un comitted and should be free to explore teh job market, he'll soon realize that the last guy wasn't so bad, or that such treatment is common, it's just that when you are new to the work force, you are not sure what to expect. Often they will pick up things from parents like, "I don't have to take that crap" or "So you know what I was asked ot do today?". They then feel that they can have that same attidude towards employers even though they don't really have any seniority or experience in teh workplace. Someone who's worked 35 years learns when too much is too much. Let him be a young man, let him move around and learn what otehrs are like. I thought my first employer was a jerk, then 10 years later really thought it wasn' tthat bad and that he wa s pretty good employer, I just didn't have a yardstick to measure with when I worked for him.

sdizzzle
sdizzzle

Facing a similar situation - working with some real jerks who get away with murder in the office. One day, I had enough and told my employer I was not going to work from the office any more. They were pissed at first, but when they told me it wasn't an option, I told them I would quit then, and suddenly the tables turned. They are now letting me work from home for a few months while they try to take steps to make the work environment more reasonable. Regardless of the fact that I'm not confident they will be successful, I am young and do not have financial obligations, so I felt compelled to stand up for what's right. And what do you know? It paid off.

Zpunky
Zpunky

Hi, I really admire your willingness to tell him to just up and leave, especially based on principals. But, there is another, educational option. I would have him learn the great art of standing up to authority, communicating his position and then making his decision. I think he could learn a great deal from having a one-on-one sit down with his manager (you and I both know it will be like he's talking to a bag of cement) and discuss the points you made in your article: more and more responsibility acknowledged with more and more criticism, along with the hypocrisy (which most young people despise yet need to learn to 'manage' in the world) of the team cheers. A well presented, thoughtful statement by your son to the manager may provide him a powerful learning experience, before he blows them off. Once he's left, he can look back at the experience knowing he communicated his concerns maturely. This is an experience he can grow from. I'd love to hear how this turns out.

lastchip
lastchip

It is very tempting in situations like this, particularly at a young age to tell them to stick their job up their .... Don't. Never lower yourself to their level, however tempting, but simply say, I think it's time we parted company. Thank you for employing me. You can then tell just what sort of a company they really are, by how they handle the situation. If they take you to one side privately and ask why you want to leave, now is the opportunity to tell them in a calm and eloquent manner, what is wrong. You never know, it may change their whole approach in the future. On the other hand, if they don't accept what you've said in good spirit, you're better off out the door. Do however, take a little time to reflect on your own perception of how you are being treated. Are you really being taken for granted, or is your perception a little off the mark. Sometimes, it's difficult to be totally honest about ourselves. We all probably have attributes that others find annoying and equally, we find annoying in others.

saintbklyn
saintbklyn

I think the article makes sense, but I think that one should get another job before quitting a job. Obviously the job wasn't so bad that he walked out of the door because of his frustration so I think taking a few deep breath finding another job and then quiting would be best.

cynic 53
cynic 53

He should start to look for another job but keep that to himself then when he gets it work his notice then leave this shower of S.O.B.s to cheer themselves until they go bankrupt(hopefully very soon thereafter)

the_webninja
the_webninja

I don't think you actually answered the overall Question WHEN is it okay to Quit your Job. You generalized yet didn't specify exactly. When I was in the Military Working under Contract for more than 7 years there were PLENTLY of times I would have Quit. But not being able to Quit taught me more about how to resolve differences and focusing more on effective communications. Now in Civilian Life, I see worse conditions than in the Military, because in the Military everyone is held accountable. In Civilian life these idiots can get away with Murder! (Or so some of them think) The level of Psychological Manipulation in the Civilian Environment is incredible! The Ultimate Solution to the Problems with all of this is to Adopt a Resource Based Ecconomy. If you don't know what that is see: http://www.thevenusproject.com/ MONEY is the Root of all Evil. (Or so some say). Take away all the Money, and you kill the problems at the Source. Now until that day comes, we still have to deal with our Current Situation. So you have weigh the Benefits with the Problems, and see which is more important. In the Military we had a Saying "Sometimes you just gotta say F-it" Meaning the Problem really isn't worth worrying about. If it doesn't affect your Schedule, or the Amount of Money you are making, then Screw it! If someone is Causing you Un-due Stress, then I advise you to see a Lawyer, because filing a Lawsuit will definetly get your bosses attention. :) The System HAS LAWS in place to Protect Employees much more than Employers. Fair Treatment is your RIGHT in the US anyway. You can Demand Respect from your Employer if you think they are messing with you. Or start Dragging your Feet the more they Desrespect you. Employers are most of the time looking for ways to Motivate their Employees. If you ACT more Motivated by Sadistic Ridicule or unfair Treatment, then they will USE that. However if you ACT as a Type A Goal Oriented individual and DO NOT Respond well to unfair Treatment, then they will treat you with more Respect. Think of it the way a Cat does. A Cat makes you chase IT. Then it tries to have you cooking it Steak and Eggs for Breakfast by acting Finicky towards everything you try to feed it. :) Until you are buying every Variety of Catfood just to find something it will eat. YOU can use the same Stratigie on your Employer. But you should NOT reward them for bad Behavior. Everytime they ask you to do something Stupid, talk to them about Re-negotiating your Salary to perform these extra Tasks. This lets them know you are not going to let them play you for a Fool. Or have a Counter Offer already to go when they ask you to do something extra, hit them with "Yeah, I could do that for you if you can give me Fridays and Saturdays off on my Schedule." Something like that. Be Smart, and don't let them Treat you like you are Stupid. Or hit them with "you know, if you keep treating me like I am Stupid maybe I'll start acting like it." Let em think about that one for a while. :) You have to understand the TOOLS of Psychological Manipulation are FEAR, GUILT, INTIMIDATION, then they try to make you "Make up for it" (For your assumed Faults they project on you) by doing more. Be ready to Counter every time. Think of it like Psychological Martial Arts. Or they will Enslave you, because that is the way of the Republicans.

aandains
aandains

I got laid-off from a different industry a year ago, just had my one year review with nothing but high marks. And if we weren't in a wage freeze I'ld be getting a raise!! Mean while, my boss "works" from home 3 days a week taking care of a 4 month old making 3 times as much money as I do (which is even tougher since I used to make that much). But hey - I got a job which is more than a lot of other people can say.

dbmchone
dbmchone

I worked in an IT Engineer sweatshop right out of college for about full two years before I finally left for the wonderful job I have now. In that job I was salary making about $36k/year doing everything from server installs/maintenance, wireless surveys and deployments, data migrations, etc.. I learned a great deal but they expected 40+ hours of "billable" time per week which did not include travel time or the time it took us to do our paperwork. The typical employee worked about 60 hours/week with no extra compensation. On top of this management rarely ever showed any sort of effort to motivate people. On one occasion I remember vividly that still makes my blood pressure rise, the two owners called a company meeting of all employees and when we arrived no one was there. only writing on the board of things they were angry at all the employees about. The company almost went under that night, but none of us were in a position to quit. Thankfull everyone that was there during that time has moved on to MUCH greener pastures. When I took my current job I worked out a months notice with them of my own volition. It was a small company and I was over many of the contracts so there was a large amount of personal guilt leaving my customers (not necessarily the company). However I soon realized how bad I had it in that old company. I am infinitely happier where I work, I got a massive raise (over 30%) and it really is more like a family. Management asks how their decisions affect us and we have team meetings weekly to see what everyone is up to and how we can help each other. I believe TechRepublic had an article not too long ago about having a bad job before you take a good job so that you really appreciate a good job when you find one. That's also something to think about.

JamesRL
JamesRL

This teenager is going through a situation many of us have faced as adults. Yes, his lack of obligations gave him more options but the priciples are similar. James

Chaz Chance#
Chaz Chance#

At no point whilst reading did you think "this is not useful to me" and exercise discrimination by stopping reading, AND you found time to post. You must never get anything important done. Personally, I find everything I read helps me grow, even your post. TR is a great site where some amazing people do us the honor of sharing their thoughts. There is much to be learned from both articles and replies.

KSoniat
KSoniat

She's a real person and was sharing her dilemma, your compassion was touching.

plymouth
plymouth

A good point about moving around and learning. A teenager really has little useful persective on life and are amazed how smart they are. Give them some years of experience and they learn how little they know and how much more there is to learn. I speak from experience. Put this in perspective; it is an entry level job which like all jobs has an exit as well to used at will. When the teenager has another job secured then moving on is appropriate.

BFilmFan
BFilmFan

I agree that chasing employers with a weed whacker does not make sense. You have to use the correct tool to induce absolute bowel-loosening total terror, as nothing surpases the sound of a gasoline powered chainsaw firing up to spark total mindless panic. If you are a truly demented sort, you can even wake up the children after watching horror movies the night before with it! http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Wcyh3S08d9Y&feature=related

PoconoChuck
PoconoChuck

I have to agree with those who say 'take the high road'. Especially at your son's age, this stuff may be demoralizing but it builds character. For what it is worth, were I out of my career position, and running short of funds, I'd relish the 'comfortable advantage' they would want to take of me. If he is at his wit's end about how they're treating him, he should go the resignation route, but be certain to attend the exit interview and speak the truth POLITELY. Saying 'this place sucks' is meaningless; saying 'I really found the group cheer demaining' may actually spare future workers the insult.

cjohn1
cjohn1

Using this bad situation as an educational experience and helping you son learn to deal with the adversity maturely will go much further in the long run than walking away unless you are positive that the discussion with management will only leave to a hostile firing. Good Luck to your son!

cupcake
cupcake

Preparing our children for the real world has to rank right up there as the hardest job I have ever had to do. I'm with you Toni. My son isn't quite there, but I see it coming. Loved the visual of the weed-eater too! But I agree with CDuncan, that this is but a first in a long line of learning how to deal with irrational bosses and companies. Each one is but an experience in which we can learn from. Knowing that in his leaving he could be helping the company (at best) and his manager (the very least) would be great, but that in the end its really about what he takes away from this experience. I, too, would love to hear how this turns out. And if you were in my area, I'd do what I could to help him locate his next job. Sounds like a decent, hardworking and respectful young man. You should be proud.

dwdino
dwdino

... submit a vote for name change. After remarks posted above, hereunto named "the_webninja" shall be known as "Beverly_Hills_Ninja" as such images are more accurate.

Guitockey
Guitockey

You Must hAve bEEn an OfficeR if you think Everyone IS hEld accOuntaBle in the MilItaRy! From An EnliSTeD StandpoInt, thAt's Not Always trUe! Nice rant. I especially like the way you ended it by blaming Republicans! Way to make your point! Learn that from Alinsky, did ya?

OldER Mycroft
OldER Mycroft

Christ knows which branch of which Military you were in but I'm glad they managed to get rid of you before you did any serious damage. They DID manage to do that, didn't they? PLEASE tell me they did. Perhaps you're a sleeper from something like the IPCRESS File - easily dismissed as a raving idiot - until they 'awaken' you again. If that is the case they did an excellent job on you. Are you entirely sure POMPANO beach is your location? From all the drivel I've just read your 'beach' should be named POMPOUS. I thought I'd heard it all in terms of nonsense but you really take the Custard Cream.

boxfiddler
boxfiddler

[i]MONEY is the Root of all Evil.[/i] [b]Love[/b] of money is the root of all evil. A very subtle difference, leading to very subtle differences in understanding. etu

toni.bowers
toni.bowers

I am proud of him. This story grew a little since I first posted. They also had him driving a fork lift that wouldn't stay in gear and ignored him when he complained about it. So it actually came down to physical well-being. He ended up calling a manager a little higher up and telling him what was going on. I was afraid that whistle-blowing would had tough repercussions for him but the next day he went to work, everyone was nice and even gave him an "atta boy" for all his hard work. We'll see how things continue. Thanks to everyone for posting and e-mailing!

cupcake
cupcake

...the lack of money is the root of all evil! I know it makes me evil when I am without it!

NickNielsen
NickNielsen

This line jumped out at me: [i]Simply stated, a resource-based economy utilizes existing resources - rather than money - to provide an equitable method of distribution in the most humane and efficient manner. It is a system in which all goods and services are available to everyone without the use of money, credits, barter, or any other form of debt or servitude.[/i] Somehow, given what I know of human nature, I doubt such an eventuality. edit: speling

BFilmFan
BFilmFan

I am not waving money at you. You might smack me thinking I was implying something. :)

Guitockey
Guitockey

It's amazing how human nature always overrides a "perfectly good" system of controlling people, huh?

NickNielsen
NickNielsen

[i]Somehow, given what I know of human nature, I doubt such an eventuality.[/i]

khumphreys
khumphreys

Gads, that was my first thought. Always preferred Deep Space 9, life outside the Federation was more interesting. Back to the original subject. I've quit on principle twice, once as a kid, living at home, had minimal impact. Later as an adult, had received my "congrats on your 15 years" letter and then two weeks later was riffed. Took a desparation job, company had many questionable practices, after serious discussions with my wife, we came to agreement and I walked. Those were very, very tough times. I recommend that he hang in 'till he lines up another job, might as well get in the habit now.

Guitockey
Guitockey

of Economics. Money, in whatever form, is nothing more than the method used to exchange goods and services, and a way to move resources to where they are the most valuable and efficient. It beats carrying around sacks full of gold, salt, seashells, chickens, whatever! All economies are resource-based. Without resources, there's no economy! What this is describing is a communal method of allocating resources. In case you haven't been paying attention, that system has never proven to be efficient or even beneficial, anywhere it's been tried (for example the original Mayflower contract, the Soviet Union, China, the New Deal & Great Society, the Obama Administration)!

neilb
neilb

jean-Luc Picard told me about it.