IT Employment

Who lies more on resumes?

The results of a recent survey conducted by CareerBuilder.com indicate that folks in the IT industry rank third among those who lie most in their resumes. Here's a look at the other stats, and some of the more outrageous lies hiring managers have unearthed.

The results of a recent survey conducted by CareerBuilder.com indicate that folks in the IT industry rank third among those who lie most in their resumes. Here's a look at the other stats, and some of the more outrageous lies hiring managers have unearthed.

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Apparently, the temptation to make their resumes stand out from the crowd is too much for some people to resist. For an article about resume fabrications, Rosemary Haefner, CareerBuilder.com senior career adviser, surveyed hiring managers and workers and found that:

  • 38 percent of those surveyed indicated they had embellished their job responsibilities.
  • 18 percent admitted to lying about their skill set.
  • 12 percent indicated they had been dishonest about their start and end dates of employment.
  • 10 percent confessed to lying about an academic degree.
  • 7 percent said they had lied about the companies they had worked for.
  • 5 percent disclosed that they had been untruthful about their job title.

What I found most interesting about this survey is that the results indicated that some industries seem more likely than others to have incidences of resume fabrication. The hospitality industry reported the most, with 60 percent of employers reporting lies on resumes. The transportation/utilities field was a close second with 59 percent. And rounding out the top three, with 57 percent of hiring managers saying they uncovered lies on resumes was IT.

The article also listed some of the most outrageous untruths found on resumes as reported by hiring managers. My favorites are:

  • Candidate claimed to be a member of the Kennedy family.
  • Applicant invented a school that did not exist.
  • Candidate listed military experience dating back to before he was born.
  • Job seeker included samples of work, which were actually those of the interviewer.

About

Toni Bowers is Managing Editor of TechRepublic and is the award-winning blogger of the Career Management blog. She has edited newsletters, books, and web sites pertaining to software, IT career, and IT management issues.

217 comments
jtwylie
jtwylie

I don't put much credit into resumes. I have probably spent hundreds of hours rewriting mine. I don't lie or embelish but I also don't include a majority of my work history and projects in my "two-page" competitive resume. I also have not had much luck with managers that focus on the certifications part of my resume. They usually aren't savvy enough to work in IT. Anyone who puts more than the "door opening opportunity" quality into a resume, vs the interview or tech out, is only touching the surface. Lots of people have others write their resumes. I just don't put too much credit into a couple pages of information for someone with 10+ years in the feild.

rahn
rahn

First time I realized this was so common, I was working for a well known organization that was moving it's operation. I was looking at the new IT manager's resume, I noticed the graduation date he had listed was after the school listed had shut it's doors. I called a phone number listed on the schools web site to see if there was some mistake and was told anyone claiming to have graduated at that date was lying. Here's the bizarre thing, when I told the people in charge they didn't care. I think he's still working for the organization.

rdtraversi
rdtraversi

I think a root problem in IT hiring is a misplaced focus on checklists of "skills". One of the results is that people feel justified in lying. I can't tell you how many brain dead loafer-wearers (can't tie shoes) have a long resume with impressive titles and duty descriptions. I often am tempted to lie myself but just can't bring myself to do it... and BOY do I resent those whom I always help that outrank me because of some previous title.

pirate?
pirate?

I once went through a placement agency. They sent me to interview with the guy I would actually be working for. I got the job -- except for one tiny problem: HR got it's nose out of joint because I'd be sent directly to the hiring manager instead of through them. Result? They refused to hire me. Speaking of HR departments: More than once I've been interviewed by some dodo HR person that had absolutely no idea what was needed for the job, ie they were interviewing for an IT position, but didn't even know what brand of computer they were using or what the OS was! Also, HR is quite often the guilty party for those overblown lists of skill sets supposedly required for the position. What? you've never heard of a typing speed minimum of 50 wpm for a PROGRAMMING JOB??!!?? Sheesh.

reisen55
reisen55

Pakrash Rampersaud Bangalore, India Recently graduate IT from Dundra University Course: IT Basics 2008, four month introduction. I desire a position to support cluster servers and workstations for 2,000 plus seat positions for any firm based in the stupid United States. Pay rate: $ 15 per hour acceptable. ***** Any outsourcing firm would hire him or her in a heartbeat!!!!!

brian
brian

The percentage of hiring managers who have uncovered lies on their employees' resumes is meaningless! The following situations will all add up to 57%: - 100% of IT employees lie on resumes, but only 57% of employers fact-check. - 10% of IT employees lie on resumes. All managers fact-check resumes. But, because each manager has multiple employees, 57% of managers have uncovered lies. - 5% of IT employees lie on resumes. 80% of small firm IT managers overwork underqualified employees to save money. Those employees turn into multifunctional daily miracle-workers. Large firm IT managers think those people are lying on their resumes, don't fact-check, or talk to the wrong person at the small firm. The latter happened to a friend of mine when he put his actual, truthful daily duties on his resume. To counter that I'm considering "dumbing down" my resume entry from the same company.

celtic0123
celtic0123

I worked with a man who lied about his college degrees. He pulled out a card that had references to confirm his Masters in Computer Science. He had a list of references and certifications on specific equipment. All fake. He gave me a number to call so that I could buy the same degrees. I didn't buy them.... But, I did call to see what was going on. If your interested I was told it would cost me upwards of $2,000.00 They dropped the price to $750.00 -when I got angry. Here' the kicker, I had to show him how to do simple upgrades. Yes, I did complain. No one listened.

lj011
lj011

Don't you have a feeling when you get into any shop, and you read any advertising, that it is a lie? (eh maybe not always a lie, but surely not truth either...) Applying for job is the same except that product is oneself. Marketing rules apply fully. Can you blame people for re-applying what they see hundred times a day?

thewesleyhouse
thewesleyhouse

I would love to see a story about how much employers lie! 'Oh we have a great team here, everybody gets along great', 'We promote from within', 'We have a great training program', 'Somebody will mentor and train you', 'We have a great benefits program', 'There is great bonus potential', 'Our CEO is not an outrageousely overpaid, incompetent, dirtbag', 'This is what you will be doing...', 'Our company is doing great'

hamidgul
hamidgul

This is very interesting topic and I want to share my experience while working on different positions: Most of time what I've seen that guys usually mention all of the products/projects of the company in their resume even they have not participated and they don't have any link or knowledge to them. Another thing, I feel neccessory to mention here that even the guy have worked on a project for couple of weeks and that project was developed in 3 years but he/she is mentioning it in his experience on the basis of their general know how about the project. I've been thru another experience that I found many cases that one project have been owned by many guys/girls that they have worked on this project but every one have different dates mentioned which that project had been done in different period of time.

nozmoking
nozmoking

I have contacts in the staffing industry. I can tell you from experience that candidates are frequently encouraged embellish things that can't readily be verified, like a former job title with a company that no longer exists. "Leads" become "Managers" and "Supervisors" become "Directors". A brief exposure to a software application is now a "high proficiency". Personally, I believe this to be unethical but from a competitive viewpoint many hiring managers tend to favor such risk-takers. They go for the "fake it 'till you make it" type of character because they believe these candidates will exhibit the kind of ambition that is valuable for executing agendas. Unfortunately I see this dynamic put into play every day.

svasani
svasani

I have seen so many bogus IT resumes, I am surpised IT came in as third. I can imagine the IT lies..I mean come on they need to pump in so many buzzwords in a two page resume. Wonder what kind of lies those hospitality and transportation folks make...Cut cost by replacing gas with red bull so trucks could have wings?

scarville
scarville

I may use words like "spearheaded" or "instrumental" or even "revolutionary" but I am very careful to not claim more experience than I have. In fact I usually leave out about 15 years in Aerospace and my first BS degree (Mechanical Engineering). However, I do emphasize different parts of my experience depending on the target. A resume is an advertisement intended to get me to the first interview. That does not excuse outright falsehoods but it does mean I can highlight my strengths.

topherius
topherius

I will be blatantly honest now. I decided to leave the big cities and good income to care for my family in Saint Louis, Misery. Yes, it is misery here. I have excelled in every job I have ever done, and considering the diversity and challenges, my resume says quite a bit: everything from a Hollywood theatre producer to acting CTO of a 14M internet startup. I do not desire such intensive occupations at this time. Here in Saint Louis, MO, I have sought relatively simple part time office work or preferably work utilizing my extensive knowlege of technololgy, and I have been informed by organiztions such as Stivers, Robert Half International, Kelley IT Service, even Circuit City and Best Buy, that I am not qualified to work as a secretary or a sales clerk. I am embarrassed to live in a town that would like to believe it is a city when it cannot even sustain an accredited educational system and be told I am not quaified to type. Should anyone desire to hire an exceptionally competent individual somewhere in a mature and developing market, I would sincerely enjoy hearing from you. Regards.

borkanserbian
borkanserbian

I think the subject is very good since it draws a serial rhetoric questions like: - True, applicants are laying, but why do they do it? Now, to be able to answer those questions we need to start from THE OPPORTUNITIES - employees and job vacancies.. Good starting point would be - what is now-days common criteria for employing one IT specialist? The answer is...hmm..: - there is over 6.684 billion people in the world - ONE-billion people, 30 % of the world's workforce, are either jobless or unemployed - (SO THIS IS JUST WORKFORCE - not including people who can't work like old, kids, disabled..) - there is a SYSTEM called CAPITALISM, where people are organized that one have for other 1000 not to have (current situation and always rising) at least one million people do IT over the world and rising. Like in any other industry, concurrence is becoming to high while the capacity of workforce is constantly being reduced by unstoppable greediness. So for our present 'accountants' not to fail their 'expectations' with constant growth of their company income, they usually find a 'money whole' in some of the 'unnecessary' stuff and one man is taking over what two man did before. Today, one man constantly works overtime, while being payed less. Now days, IT specialists have to know twice as much as they would've needed before to get a job as 'why would an employer hire and pay two man to do the work which can be done by one man? - this one guy might won't have enough time for break and will generally work 2 hours overtime daily but is also less counted per hour then regular work time and it's his life, not ours - and WE ARE SAVING'.. 'why would I hire only system administrator, when I could use a programmer to do the same work including programming for the same money' no mistake, they are saving - but for how long? - well long enough until next substitute arrive and hopefully for them it can always be found What was the question again? why people lie? ??? it's more common for the people with their ground burning (and the number of them is also rising) and it's the problem of ethical perception 'when makeup turns to a lie' Without moral code of behavior, humanity will break apart, and law can't set it up, only religion can B.P.

rdrainer
rdrainer

who modify previously honest resumes to present to their clients, and their product is so far off the accurate original that going into an interview is really dodgey because dates and other details have been altered beyond recognition. The candidate has to study their own resume, with the headhunter's revisions, to understand their own history for answering detailed questions by the interviewer. This inevitably makes for bad blood and lost opportunities, and it is so often that a candidate has to insist that a headhunter not alter the details, and not pad nor otherwise embellish the resume so they can make a quick sale. My response to this is to just rat out the headhunter, present the accurate resume and let whatever happens happen. I do probably lose contract work for doing that, but it's much better than being caught as a participant in a lie, later on.

ragglestein
ragglestein

Hmmm...makes you wonder how endemic lies are as part of the 'fabric' of much of how we all conduct business. After all, we are social creatures and lying is as much a part of being 'social' as we are human.

shepherd
shepherd

:-) That is unbelievable... I do not want to put much of my abilities on my resume so that i can surprise my employer. If you put too much detail then they will expect more of you and sometimes feel like they have exhausted your abilities and then THE LAW OF DIMINISHING RETURNS STARTS TO WORK. :-) Shepherd Nhongo Snr Sys.Admin www.helpdesk.co.bw

dbecker
dbecker

First of all, if we are talking about major Corporations, HR doesn't have a clue about what they want in an IT candidate. Honesty is the best policy, but just remember, it's not even relevant when the resumes are scanned and a program is employed to identify the appropriate buzzwords to either reject the resume or hold it aside for consideration. As a manager, I once worked for a misfortune 50 company who needed a part time operator. I went through 700 resumes to identify 3 candidates for a panel interview. 15/16ths of the resumes indicated absolutely no pertinent qualifications worth considering whatsoever. Sometimes the Corporate Bureaucracy actually isn't worth the effort -- you could almost catch a bus and choose a candidate at random amongst the riders and train them to do the job -- it would be cheaper, faster and probably produce better results. [One should note that HP did a classic back end of this, having a program to choose candidates who could not claim discrimination to lay off and picked were older experienced white men in a high wage bracket. It worked: Nary a civil suit to the program's credit.] Then there's the problem of being overqualified -- a useful deterrent to hiring the competent, employed by HR representatives everywhere. It turns out I'm an IBM Systems Programmer who has for five years single-handedly maintained the entire operating system including, but not restricted to, z/OS, CICS, DB2, rmm, FOCUS, RACF, TWS and a host of third party products including the monitors. Do you really think that if I were going for another job that I would actually admit that I was a one-man show? First of all, it would be completely lost on the nimnulls in HR. Secondly, the ones in the know would think I'm lying because it just isn't possible. Thirdly, in major corporations, for purpose of audit and control, I'd be resoundingly rejected because of the threat I would pose to their precious environment because I know too much. So it is that no one can afford the "general" resume: Each one really needs to be target the job as described in the ads: Vomit back the requirements. But do be careful: Even if it is the truth, the company or agency doing the hiring IS LYING TO YOU IN THE AD! That's the position that HR said they could have and not the one they really need [for budgetary reasons]. Thus it is that the ad says "Windows Server Specialist" when they really want a Sun Solaris Sybase administrator -- or worse, a Sun Solaris Sybase administrator experienced with IBM Mainframe to be able to interface the whole mess together in a Winchester House like fashion to keep their insane systems going because of a total LACK OF PLANNING! Dear friends, what you are dealing with is THE BEAST POWER. It will lie to you and doesn't really know what it wants. You aren't dealing with a real person: A corporation is an it -- a thing, devoid of conscience. Lying is irrelevant. Honesty and integrity is irrelevant. You will be assimilated. Resistance is futile. You will become faceless among the Borg collective without any individuality. If only your resume is accepted.

petrosianii
petrosianii

Great Friday, end-of-the-week article! I think most of us have embellished a resume at one time or another, when we feel desparate, hard-up to land a new job. I could definitely see that techhies would be more likely to lie on a resume; so many of them are ego-maniacs with inferiority complexes!! New York hotel employee

tschoenr
tschoenr

Ha ha. I found a guy on Linked-In who said he was VP of Client Services of a company I had founded. He of course never worked there.

ChrisTheta
ChrisTheta

I had an applicant professing to have 10 years experience in Windows XP. Problem is, XP hasn't been around that long. I also had an applicant who said he was a networking expert. Unfortunately, he didn't know what IP stood for.

rhkramer
rhkramer

Although I'm sure "incidences" is in some dictionary (maybe even most dictionaries), incidents is the more common usage and simpler (at least, to say).

paul
paul

As a recruiter, I can say no matter what, you should ALWAYS tell the truth. Think of it this way - if you really feel the need to embellish your credentials just to land that one specific job, then it's probably not going to be a fit. And if it's not a fit, then neither you or the company would end up satisfied. Better to always take the high road, and if it's truly a position you want, but may lack a credential or two the company is looking for, then go and get those credentials and apply at a later time, even if it's a different company looking for the same thing. Nothing beats landing a position where you, and the company, are a true match. That's what it's all about.

prosenjit11
prosenjit11

It is the responsibility of the Hiring Manager to first scrutinize it and understand the capabilities from a discussion based on his requirements. Every experience counts. Everything is on the Interview and discussion if required call the candidate 10 times to find out every bit he has worked and what he wants to do in the job. Rather looking for blunders made after you recruit the candidate. Why is a Hiring Manager paid more or in the position of responsibility, mainly to understand the skills of the candidate whether theoritical or practical and then decide for the Entry. Not just to achieve numbers and then in the future discussing Filth and Dirt.

NotSoChiGuy
NotSoChiGuy

...to find potential candidates (given criteria from the hiring manager), assess whether someone seems to have the required level of communicative/social abilities (via phone and face-to-face interviews), and query into the background. Anything beyond that is going beyond the scope of their skill set; as your examples illustrate.

drl.techrepub
drl.techrepub

... is far from unreasonable as that's quite slow and even someone who "pecks" at the keyboard could, if they are very fast, just about achieve that. However, any seriously productive programmer would have gone to the trouble of learning to touch type! It took me two weeks of half an hour a night to learn, that's all. After that my productivity soared, code was commented significantly more and better for it, and preliminary documentation became a far easier proposition. If I was hiring anyone in IT I'd be delighted if they could touch-type already, and train them immediately if not. I would not entertain hiring anyone who refused to acquire such a basic skill after being offered the chance to acquire it. A programmer who has to look at the keyboard while coding is slower, less likely to comment their code with useful additional information, is not going to see their typo mistakes until they "review" their code, and is going to more likely be a victim of RSI (neck and fingers) because of bad posture. Too damn right I would put that as a DESIRED attribute. I wouldn't deny myself a good coder if they couldn't touch-type though because that would be just stupid, but I would make it the number one priority when they started that they would learn. They would benefit so much by having the skill, and so would I because their productivity would increase by 400-500% (and that isn't a made up figure, it really does make that much difference). It's the difference between speed-walking and running a marathon. The coder who doesn't touch-type works far harder and less efficiently than one who does. If you don't agree with me then learn to touch-type so you can prove me wrong. Only if you code AND touch-type will you know the true benefits. How can anyone work with computers if they do not acquire the basic skill of using the main input device properly and as it was designed to be used? I would love to know what the proportion of touch-typers to keyboard pecking actually is. I suspect horrifyingly low.

a.southern
a.southern

at $15USD per hour he's charging 8 times the going rate. It's all about quality of life. If you want to maintain our western quality of life, you can't complain when people infinately more qualified and experienced than the graduate you fabricated are willing to work for $8USD a day in China or India, then you just have to think "Hat's off to them!" The problem comes when the wages equalise, when they are paid the same as the us, Markovian Dynamics would have shifted the majority of work and skillsbases over to him, then how do you win it back from China or India? You wouldn't do it by charging the same rate as him. -AS

bamyclouse
bamyclouse

The first day of orientation is a real problem; the person doing the orientation does not realize how much the person in the seats has been lied TO and then they take it out on the educator. Most people don't realize that in most companies a 50% turnover at the 1 yr mark is NORMAL. 2 wrongs don't make a right, but still, it would help if employers didn't lie so much.

BrainiacVI
BrainiacVI

Because companies use them to "score" you. I applied at one place and during the interview I got to see my original resume on the interviewer's desk. They had highlighted all the buzzwords and then had assigned me a score based on the number of word highlighted. The three candidates with the highest scores would be forwarded to the requesting department. The HR drone told me I was not qualified, even though I had already talked to the department head and he had wanted to hire me on the spot, but had to go through channels. I finally convinced the HR person to call the manager who proceeded to blast his ears off about how I was qualified even though I did not have the "winning" score. I eventually got the job, but not before HR forced the department head to interview the "better" candidates.

BrainiacVI
BrainiacVI

I've dealt with clueless HR departments. One in particular wanted to know how many Z-80 programs I had written. I answered "One" a nine month project for an arcade game cartridge. I later learned a "friend" applied for the same job. No doubt when asked the question, he answered "Hundreds", not mentioning his definition of a "program" may only have been five lines of code. Needless to say, he got the job. Another job I applied for, the person I'd eventually report to was doing the interview. She gave great interview, she was respectful, courteous, willing to listen. All qualities she dropped once I had the job, which went from being a Team Leader (a position at my previous employer that would have put me in charge of multi-million dollar projects) to being able to wipe my nose with two week's prior written authorization request. But it paid significantly more than my previous job. I've since seen job ads requesting three times my 30 years experience for 1/3rd of my pay. I guess a sort of Dilbertian intelligence test. Early in my career I interviewed for a computer operator's job (they wanted someone with a degree but made an exception in my case) and once on the job the position was that of data tech instead and I was taken to the door of the computer room, allowed to peer in and was told that in two years I might be allowed to enter. I ended up taking a different job where I was operator for two computers (later three) immediately. But then I learned that the reason I got the job over the other 27 applicants was that I was the only one that didn't mind working 3rd shift. I've heard from a friend whose sister was in HR that she would throw out all resumes printed on non-white paper or used exotic fonts. Another said his manager would "throw out the resume of Jesus Christ himself, if it was more that one page long." Then there is puffery. I came across the resume of a former higher up who claimed she was a "Producer of TV commercials". Her involvement was to write the check. Once I was consulting and my employer said that I did good work, but that I charge too much. I guess he never saw the correlation.

tuomo
tuomo

I would believe you - some ((in)sane?) mainframe environments are or at least were that way - one systems programmer handling all that. My experience is earlier, from MFT to MVS/XA including just everything. Great times, IT growing from 30 to way over 500 and especially because I also owned the capacity planning and infrastructure budget (we were a profit center!) but try to make someone today to believe that someone with a programmer title had an authority to sign up $5 million - got a nice pen from IBM sales! I left after 10 years for a consulting job (14x5 days easier than 24x7) when the family started growing - still a systems programmer, that title has suffered a very bad inflation since then! Well, actually my boss was the previous systems programmer and great help when not busy with internal politics, that at least hasn't changed, probably never will! And two weeks after I left, I found him a sales manager job in same company and from which he retired after 16 years. The funny thing and understandable - they hired 12 people to fill our positions and 8 more a year later - nobody was any more ready to work those 24h days! And I had only one ulcer at the whole time, after a huge but successful infrastructure upgrade, worst our doctors had ever seen based on their diagnosis. Yes, we had our own health department, fortunately because they said that I might have died from internal bleeding if gone home that day! Fun times, I got two months company paid family vacation in Spain but you are right, nothing really to put to a resume except maybe the PM trainig but even that is old now!

kylehutson
kylehutson

I've got the ultimate interview question for somebody that claims to be a networking expert. Send a test e-mail in front of the applicant. Ask him to describe in as much detail as possible everything that happened. If the answer takes less than a minute, he's no networking expert. If they can describe MX records, ARPs, and ethernet encoding, you've got a winner.

eclypse
eclypse

That was a good one - considering that Boston College says they don't have an engineering department or program. Same guy said he had a Microsoft MCP cert and a Cisco CCNP (which I think he should have had CCNA since Cisco had never heard of the one he listed). He failed the Microsoft test and Cisco had never heard of the guy. This guy was so stupid that he locked himself out of his own computer by breaking his NTFS permissions and had to have one of us help him out with that. The guy was good with BS - that's for sure - he slipped through the cracks in the middle of a management changeover - I knew he was an idiot the first time I ever talked to him because he (with a supposed Cisco certification) could not even remember the show interface command. To top it off, we found out that he was applying for a high-level IT position at CNN, but they actually made him take a test which he failed miserably. =)

todd.stockslager
todd.stockslager

Or, to quote Jimmy Buffett: Incident or accident It all depends on if you're meant To understand Which raises a serious question about language, especially in multi-country and culture environments so many of us work. It is very important in spoken communication to echo and clarify to make sure that the words we think we heard are the ones the speaker actually said or intended. My favorite personal example: I was working with a Russian co-worker on IM who told me to click on the "ranch" icon in some software I was trying to test. I searched the screen desperately for an icon that looked like a house or home, thinking it would take me to a home screen, before we finally shared the screen remotely. She promptly clicked on an icon of a wrench (representing a configuration module). After I stopped laughing, I said 'You meant "wrench", not "ranch"'! The interesting thing is that my Russian co-worker had never seen the word "wrench" written down, she had just heard other co-workers refer to the icon verbally. She thought they were saying "ranch", and having minimal English vocabulary she wasn't able to identify the error of associating a picture of a wrench with the word "ranch"! The error may have been compounded by the fact that she was working in Austin, TX, where "ranch" is a word one might actually hear in daily conversation, and some of her co-workers may have had Texas accents that would make the spoken words sound alike. So, incident or accident, it all depends on if you're meant to understand.

Tony Hopkinson
Tony Hopkinson

being the filling in a nubile blonde twins sandwich would be good as well. As it is I'll make do with a vivid dream, and the bottle of cheap plonk I won in the pub raffle. Get real...

zeshu
zeshu

are you insanse?? I mean really? In IT, there is NOT honesty. It is irrelevant. Becuase the job spec that you posted had a 50 buzzwords which will NOT be used by the company and is mostly certainly immposible that a person can know every single one of them to right to the foot of their mouth. So readers, ignore this bafoon above! Lie, as much as you can. Because if you get caught, you dont have to worry about anything, just move on. Crank up your experience, rig it, tweak it, add a couple of years here, a couple of years their, add most (if not all) buzz words in your cv. Do a couple of dozen certifications (use braindumps to pass). And all of this will eventually get your foot to the door. Beyond this point it is your ability to waffle. Waffle all the way, most of the time the managers will be interviewing u and mostly all the managers waffle, u will be hired. If some one technical is their, unless he/she is a senior dev, u can get away with it. Remember bull**** can take u a long way. Embrace it. Love it. Do it. And soon you will have a 6 figure salary in no time. Any one who denys that is a hypocrite because we ALL LIE. YES! WE ALL DO IT.

dragosb
dragosb

If a junior programmer was six months in charge with design, coding and responsible for 2 teammates? work and he is saying that he was "Team Leader" (never having this title), is this a lie? And, of course, is a BIG difference being a manager in a 10 employee company or in a 1000 one. The Hiring Manager should make the difference.

rdrainer
rdrainer

Get modern. If you want to specify a minimum typing speed of 50 WPM, shouldn't that requirement be accompanied by the companion skill to move a mouse, say, 13 IPS and issue a minimum of 20 CPS (Clicks/Second)? When does ridiculous end for an occupation that with success achieved by sound and creative thinking? On the other hand, my 50 years of hunt-and-peck typing has served me well and I'm glad of it.

bratwizard
bratwizard

I dictate all my code. That's what assistants are for :)

santeewelding
santeewelding

You be looking and thinking just like the rest of us. I care not for the details. Only that you look and that you think. Let me know when you think you have it down pat. I'll have questions for you. So will so many others.

brian
brian

No idea what you mean. Are you implying you think I sound like someone who would lie on a resume? Implying my wording should be called foul upon? Dislike my treatment of small firms? The friend I mention worked for a small firm in an entry-level support position, but had HTML, Linux and database skills. He ended up building them a web site with active content. They never changed his job title because they would feel obligated to pay more than $10/hour. He put the web development on his resume and applied for a job elsewhere. He had friends there who overheard a conversation about an entry level support guy claiming web development on his resume and questioning it. They called his boss's boss, who didn't know about it, and was labeled a resume liar. Now, if they'd called his actual boss, they would have gotten a different story. But they didn't. Sad thing is he's got more "integrity" than most people I've met, along with one of those personalities cherished by management; skilled, willing to work insane hours if the company needs it, and just on loyalty and the hope of recognition and advancement. He got burned by greedy or lazy managers three times and quit I.T. Last I heard he manages a Subway. So naturally, a TR article saying "OMG I.T. PEOPLE ARE ALL LIARS," fudging statistics to get higher numbers, makes me shake my head a little. And no, it's not me. I was just burned by the same company he was once.

Tony Hopkinson
Tony Hopkinson

as a client server database developer, by an ADO Expert, as described by recruitment numpty and no doubt the candidate. The recruiter had to ring me me back as I dropped the phone while rolling about laughing.

bratwizard
bratwizard

You left out the trip through the CPU, registers, various hardware routing, I/O ports (unless we're using memory-mapped IO), conversion to machine code, program counter, stack manipulation, jumps & subroutine calls (I'll bet there were some pretty nifty indirect addresses in there), the conversion of the machine code into internal microcode, the explanation regarding the CPU's architecture (is it Harvard or Von Neuman style, for instance), the space-gate pathways at the various P-N or N-P junctions on the chip substrate... Sheesh, come to think of it, even YOUR explanation was lacking quite a bit...

BFilmFan
BFilmFan

I once got offered a position based on my answer to ONE question about what does the Infrastructure Master do in Active Directory. I answered, "It's the GUID Hander-Outer and Phantom Buster." The gentleman conducting the interview started laughing, looked at his team that was there for the interview and said, "When do you think we should have him start?" That was on a Friday morning at 11. Monday 8 AM, I was at work for the client for a year. Weird, but true story.

bamyclouse
bamyclouse

I had one who locked themselves into the restroom 3 TIMES in less than 8 hrs! This despite being warned about a tricky lock and how to handle it - totally unteachable. It was soooo funny because all we heard from this person was how they really didn't need anyone to teach them anything because they had a PhD - over and over and over again! As for how the person functioned in their profession and how good a resource they were - that person is long gone and still the butt of a lot of jokes. Didn't have the basics of the profession down, but had all these creds and legit degrees, we could not figure out how they passed! All experience was sort of verified but to me, when the HR depts. from companies A through Z won't tell the hiring company anything other than, yes, this person did work here, that should be a red flag. What's unsaid is often more telling than what IS said!

GreenPirogue
GreenPirogue

I automatically bin those having degrees from Boston University. Automatically. I have had bad experience with two hires from there.

reisen55
reisen55

At Aon Group, 140 IT staffers, desktop support engineers and server support engineers, were outsourced OUT in December of 2005. There real reason was that CSC had to save their bruised contract with Aon that was already $200 million over first year contract amount. I wonder why that was? At any rate, the replacements for our positions came in from BancTec and of these young kids, who thought you could copy Lotus Notes database files onto a floppy disk and did know how to open up a Dell Optiplex case was one, ONE, individual whose previous job was.....kid you not ... Pizza Delivery. Lying on Resumes? Oh, sure.

BrainiacVI
BrainiacVI

Oh yeah, I had one over the phone qualifying questionnaire I had to take. As they were telling I did not pass, they gave me the correct answers...and they were wrong! The one that really got me was the one asking "What is the database backend to Visual Basic?" I answered, "The Jet Engine." I was wrong, "MS Access" was the answer they were looking for. There were others, but that one stuck out.

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