IT Employment

Why employees quit their jobs

Here's why employees quit their job. Managers, what can you do to reduce turnover in your shop?

This infographic, created for BOLT by nfographic World, shows why employees quit their jobs. See if you can find yourself in there. Or, if you're a manager, see what you can do to reduce turnover in your shop and create a better workplace environment for all.

About

Toni Bowers is Managing Editor of TechRepublic and is the award-winning blogger of the Career Management blog. She has edited newsletters, books, and web sites pertaining to software, IT career, and IT management issues.

6 comments
kmk2
kmk2

This is the most rediculous looking graphic I've ever seen for data. Thanks for the hard to read kindergarten cartoon. Even Toni says, "See if you can find yourself in there."

Tony Hopkinson
Tony Hopkinson

that from those who thought there would be advancements opportunites, sane hours and workload? All interesting stuff, but what are they going to do about it, history suggests nothing... Mind you I'm not sure they should, it's just the way of things. After all what drives us to improve so we can advance? Long hours and insane workloads are big factors.

pbohanna
pbohanna

Something that adds to stress is the fallout from a wave of redundancies, which can cause longer hours, heavier workloads, stalled career advancement and also the stress of dealing with the contacts of the person who had left. At one company, I worked in a small team with some members being experts in their particular field, no-one else really understood what they did. When the experts were made redundant there were a few weeks of calm, with the odd phone call (sometimes going to voice mail), otherwise everything seemed ok. After a few weeks, of neglect, systems started failing and phone calls to the departed experts ran hot, it was absolute kaos. Some of the redundant experts were willing to help out, others who were already busy in new jobs, not so much. The remaining team members took on what they could of the experts workloads, but most of it was farmed out to other specialists within the wider corporation (working overseas). I have attended meetings and seminars where management have said that their people are the companies most valuable asset and that money is not the most motivating factor that gets people to work, challenging work gets people going. These lectures usually came before news that there are no pay rises and a greater workload is on its way. I like challenging work but not the challenge of doing more of the same work; and I like more money. As far as pay goes, I see perks as a bonus and integral part of a job. Word got around that a rival company had installed a gym in their computer centre for their shift workers. In no time our company was losing shift workers to the rival company at an alarming rate, in response our company installed a shower for early starter workers.

razzamatazzer@yahoo.com
razzamatazzer@yahoo.com

They may have been where you're at -at one time,but they seem to have forgotten what they didn't like happening to them at that time.They should really try to put themselves in your place when you have gripes.It all seems like a bottom-line item for me(how much time they save by putting more work on stressed-out people and cutting corners).Also,it is easy for them to replace the older workforce for cheaper paid and younger workers,but they fail to realize that experience counts a lot and that they get what the are paying for.....

Ed Woychowsky
Ed Woychowsky

I once worked for a manager who told us during a team meeting that his job was to create stress, because stress made people creative. This manager would withhold information, pile on assignments and dole out work due on Monday at quiting time on Friday. Afterwards we minions got together and decided that he was right, we were more creative. Several of us creatively found new positions with other companies, except for the one programmer that said his creativity helped him think of several ways to kill someone without getting caught. I was never so happy to leave a job, because I'd rather not be called on to testify.

Tony Hopkinson
Tony Hopkinson

provide enough 'erm reason to advance and improve, we don't need knobheads who pile more on for a laugh.

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