iPhone

Apple iPhone 5: Guaranteed to disappoint

The smart money is now on the new iPhone offering solid improvements rather than revolution. So, with no obvious killer feature, the big question is whether Apple's new smartphone is simply destined to dissatisfy.

The Apple ad announcing the 12 September launch event features a prominent 5 beneath the date. Photo: Apple

Apple is widely expected to announce a new iPhone at an event in San Francisco on 12 September. Given the present feeding frenzy, it better had.

The release pattern for iPhones so far goes along the lines of a major design update every two years and an internal hardware update in between. This pattern is reflected in the nomenclature. iPhone 3G was followed by the 3GS, and the iPhone 4 by the 4S.

There's nothing at this point to suggest the hardware iterative cycle development will change. After all, it's a neat way of catching users coming to the end of their standard two-year contract.

However, with the launch of the 'new iPad' instead of the 'iPad 3', the writing may be on the wall for the branding, with the new device being simply called the 'new iPhone'.

That said, the Apple ad announcing the event features a prominent 5 beneath the date. For the sake of clarity in the article we'll stick to the iPhone 5 name.

The six months leading up to a new Apple product are a slick of rumours and guesswork based on leaked shots of rumoured parts and divination from analysts on deals in the supply chain.

Now a week away from the likely launch, barring any huge surprises, we have a reasonable consensus of what's in and what's out.

Looking down the list, it's not a hugely exciting inventory of new hardware features.

Although the iPhone 5 is likely to be a solid improvement on an already impressive phone, I suspect it will be a case of evolution when most are hoping, or insisting, for revolution.

For all the new technology that will be packed into the iPhone 5 I suspect that the initial response to the new iPhone will be disappointment. At least from the media.

So what are the likely new features of the iPhone 5?

Next-generation LTE

We should expect support for the next-generation LTE wireless standard. The technology appeared in the new iPad and users report speedy performance away from wi-fi. However, only the US, Canada and a handful of other countries support the standard.

In the UK it's difficult to care as we don't 4G - and sometimes struggle to get half-decent 3G - but if this is the kind of thing that floats your boat then go crazy with excitement. I'm betting they'll be a little more careful how they market 4G after the ruckus that followed the launch of the new iPad.

Better camera

Improvements to the camera are certain: a few more megapixels, a few more improvements to the optics.

Quad-core processor

The new iPhone may have a quad-core processor. Hardly marketable to Apple's core audience but faster is always better.

Missing NFC

No near-field communications technology also seems to be the consensus, although iOS 6 will ship with Passbook - Apple's new app for managing boarding passes, coupons and loyalty cards. One for the 5S probably.

Smaller dock connector

It is predicted to have a revised smaller dock connector. Yay. None of my accessories and cables work without an adapter any more.

Nano-sim

A nano-sim: savour its tiny form factor as you slip it into the phone and never see it again.

New physical design

All these features are worthy additions to the existing iPhone, particularly when considered as the sum of their parts. But the new iPhone's physical design is the thing that will be eagerly awaited.

Yet the design of the iPhone is expected to be an evolution of the present model. Again, no bad thing. But I've never looked at my iPhone 4 and thought: "What a grotesquely chubby little brick thou art."

No doubt the iPhone 5 will be slimmer, due to the speculated screen improvements that will let Apple strip the touch-sensitive level off the bigger screen.

Screen size

Screen size is the big one for me. My hope - and confession - is that it remains the same size it has always been.

The iPhone has remained relatively true to its initial design as far as the screen is concerned. Same size, same dimensions with only the resolution increasing. It seems to be a sweet spot for screen size.

Rumours have it that the screen size will increase to about four inches, either through taking the screen right to the edge or making the phone slightly taller.

Again, a four-inch screen isn't something we're going to get too excited about. Most have larger screens than the iPhone's 3.5 inches and some like the Galaxy Note are pushing beyond the five-inch barrier.

Retina display

The iPhone 4 had a killer feature - the retina display. To a lesser extent the 4S had Siri.

I have a feeling the iPhone 5 may lack a killer feature that can capture the media's imagination. On 12 September I suspect the response from the tech press will be one of disappointment. The reaction is likely to be that NFC is missing, or the screen isn't quite big enough, or the camera didn't pack in enough megapixels.

There will inevitably be complaints that this is proof Apple has lost some of its magic with the passing of Steve Jobs. That Samsung, HTC and others have caught up with the Cupertino company.

It won't matter a jot. The iPhone 5 will be a solid evolution of a mature product and one, remember, that has already been revealed back in June with the iOS 6 presentation - the OS update arriving imminently.

Apple's real magic lies in bits and bytes of software not in the physical atoms of its anodised aluminium cases and glass displays. The latest software trick has already been revealed to let developers prepare for the platform: an impressive new maps technology, better Facebook integration and improvements to Siri.

The iPhone 5, or new iPhone, will be on sale by the end of the month. The smart money's on initial disappointment that another revolution wasn't delivered.

It won't matter. The launch will swiftly be followed by millions of new iPhone sales from Apple customers old and new and further dominance of the market's profits. The 13 September headlines will be 14 September's waste paper.

What I've learned from a few years of watching Apple is that it doesn't design devices for the press or the geek community. It designs them for the other, larger section of the market.

236 comments
tonycopp
tonycopp

It just wouldn't be right if the hotties sat on the shelf, but the story is old and the bloom is off the rose. Looks like the open system Androids are gob-smacking Steve's child in the Sixties; this time he's where cool was.

r.j.thomas
r.j.thomas

What do you mean by NetFlix underestimated consumer attitude to change? I ditched NetFlix because there was nothing there. "30 days free!" Oooo... then I opened the box and found it empty. I wasn't averse to change (in fact, I went to NetFlix because I thought it would have more online than LoveFilm) but have been dissapointed with both. It's all primarily TV programs, and even then (on LoveFilm at least) I couldn't find Mad Men available (granted I'm on the cheapest tarrif). Anyway, I don't think "Lightning" will be the iPhone 5s downfall 'cos it won't have one. I think it's Apple building in exclusivity again. "Oh sorry, I can't use your dock because my phone's too new :)". It's probably much more obvious- at a glance- than some other aesthetic features. I also think the same about this only-5-million-sold malarky; marketing again, it's far more effective to sell out of a product (thereby creating more demand) than over-stock and "only" report 6 million sold. It all creates an air of exclusivity. You could sell 10 million out of 20 million stocked, but people might then question poor sales- why are there 10 million left? Selling out of 5 million is much better- people get jittery- MUST HAVE ONE!- and so are more likely to rush out, queue etc. I have to hand it to them; Apple market like demons.

Atharton_CB
Atharton_CB

Honestly an Apple fanatic will buy the phone even if it has same feature all over again with very few changes than the previous version. Thanks to the great marketing effort from Apple. N there is nothing wrong about it, it's just that recent patent wars has people to talk more negatives about it than positives,... Athar

Petebgolf
Petebgolf

Having numerous Iphone Docking devices scattered throughout my home and car that will require a $29.95 adapter that may, or may not support my current devices will in fact preclude me from jumping on the Iphone5 bandwagon. This may become Apple's Achille's Heel just as Netflix underestimated consumer reaction to change Apple may pay the price for Lightning Connector innovation that users don't need.

ricardoc
ricardoc

the following is still true (this was sent to an Apple consultant by their request and we are still waiting for an answer): 1. iOS included mail app is poorly designed; issues are: a. Replying to an email while attaching a picture - It is easy just to send a picture but not to reply to an email attaching one. The workaround is way too complicated and inefficient. We want this app to behave more like a real mail app. b. Replying to an email attaching any other type of document (PDF, Word, Excel) - This one is even a worst situation, since there is no file explorer in iOS attaching a document to an email has to be done from inside the app; this does not helps with replies to other emails. c. Can’t collapse folders - If you have a lot of folders you keep scrolling down and up all the time. Collapsing folders is a must have; it has been requested for ages with no feedback from Apple. 2. The restrictive nature of using the device as storage over USB is not only ridiculous is counterproductive. a. We are carrying around a device with storage capacities of 16GB to 64GB and can’t use it as we normally do with USB dongles; why? b. Here the use of a file explorer that can access user defined folders will be practical. You attach the phone to your PC, drag and drop a bunch of folders and files and go. Later you can review an open any file from those folders with the right application. We don’t want absolute dependency on the internet connection just to review some files (like with DropBox or Google Drive) and the complications from VPN connections. We understand that access to all system folders via USB is dangerous but this can be worked out so they are protected from accidental or intentional access. c. As a storage device the phone could be used to do PC backups that can be taken offsite and saved to other locations. 3. We want to be able to share the device’s screen whether or not the device is playing pictures, videos or presentations. a. I can’t recall the number of times I wanted to show an audience of people how to do something on the phone and be frustrated by the fact I can’t share the device screen through a TV or projector. We currently have scheduled a seminar on some apps for business and it is on hold because we are trying to decide what’s the best way to put this demo on a big screen to a group of people. Some of the users could be using the apps at this point if they knew more about them and their practical use. This is revenue loss for developers and Apple. b. Sharing the screen and being able to connect a Bluetooth KB will complete the setup for a user to use the iPhone as its sole computer. It has everything most users will ever need to do their jobs (Internet browser, mail app, office apps, music app, etc.) 4. The device needs to allow to remote connect to it (as in VNC, TeamViewer, etc.) a. In a corporate environment where the iPhone has taken a stronghold and most users depend on the device’s health, being able to remotely connect to it for the Help Desk to troubleshoot is a necessity; in this sense we need to treat the iPhone as just another computer. It is complicated and time wasting going through the phone with voices instructions and feedback from the user. This is a must have in business! 5. Network browsing should be included as part of the iOS; there is no need to install a separate app. This is a must have feature in a business environment. a. The iPhone is like a computer that can open, edit and save files, but can connect to a network natively; that’s just dumb for a business scenario. By including that ability natively there is no need to have a sprawl of different apps for the single purpose of network browsing. b. The network browsing ability should be matched with a File Browser on the phone so files can be copied to/from the device to the network. 6. Better integration with printers; not only WiFi but networked printers in general. a. Having to depend on new printers like those inkjet or laser for consumers so you can print from the phone is a no go on business environments. Corporations have invested big money in networked printers that can be used to print to from the phone through the network to which the device is connected via WiFi; why can some kind of drivers be worked out for printing to networked printers? c. This printing capability should not be dependant on a computer shared printer; I don’t see any IT department installing another piece of software on their print servers just so the phones can print to the networked printers. Neither the IT department wants to add just another software to all iPhone users' computers so they can use their PC as a gateway to print from the phone. What happens when your PC is off or you just got to the office and you’re rushing to meeting and need to quickly print something? Are you going to wait for your PC or laptop to boot just to print? d. Buying an app to be able to print from each phone adds to the cost of the device plus the added admin costs of maintaining another piece of software on the PC of all phone users. 7. WiFi issues. There seems to be a problem with WiFi networks using WPA personal or WPA2 type of security; it takes a longer time to connect or it fails. Users have reported being kicked out of the network. 8. Issues with listening music through a BT earpiece; voicemails are OK but music is not! 9. PDF reading compatibility issues - It has happen in quite a few occasions that opening PDF files attached to email results in the file displaying with some of the information missing. However opening the file on a PC or Android phone displays all info. 10. Hardware improvements - Stylus, bigger screen size, BT keyboard profiles. Bring me all that and then I won't be disappointed. Thanks,

awans
awans

i see apple as a company dreaming future tech. patenting the dreams applying the borrowed tech. from other companies

DJ_JFX
DJ_JFX

Samsung Galaxy S III has crossed the 20 million sales mark in the 100 days since launching in May. (Global cheer!!! Rawwrrr!!!!!) This follows a recent report that at three of the four big U.S. carriers, the Galaxy S III did outsell the iPhone 4S in August, although consumers are likely waiting for the next iPhone (yeah ok...if you say so...) Also, Samsung intends to sue Apple should the next iPhone use LTE technology. (very interesting week up ahead....who's making the popcorn??)

awgiedawgie
awgiedawgie

I'm not worried. I shall continue the faithful tradition I've carried on with every new release from Apple. I'll ignore it. They have yet to come out with anything that says to me, "you can't live without one." There is always a tremendous amount of hype surrounding a new product or version, and I think that's where they win over the majority of their customers - their lemmings. My personal favorite bit of mindless advertising balderdash came with the iPad when Apple described its 9 1/2 inch screen as being "ideal for watching movies." That may indeed be the best thing you can do with it, but that's just because it's not "ideal" for anything else. I'm sorry, but I just can't think of anything that a screen that small is "ideal for watching" - unless maybe you want to feel a little nostalgic about watching old episodes of "I Love Lucy" and "The Lone Ranger" on a tiny TV. My 47 inch TV comes a lot closer to being "ideal for watching movies," but I'd much rather have something like the new 80 inch model that's out now. Of course, for the price, I could just buy myself a car and drive to the theatre.

jimmyhelu
jimmyhelu

Wall Street cuts losses on Apple strength ... the stage for what is widely expected to be the release of the iPhone 5.

przh
przh

IMO, the i variety(iphone, ipad,ipod,ipod nano, etc.) has passed from the users top choice, to one more in the list from which they can choose, i may say it was samsung galaxi, and the motodroid, which invited users to try other brands and the voice of mouth did the rest. Me, I was in marveled with samsugn galaxi SII, but the nokia lumia 900, grabbed my attention,, it may not be as advanced as galaxi III, but it sure fills my needs. I don't really care if Apple launches a "new Iphone", i don't need another iphone 4 with a new cover.

r.j.thomas
r.j.thomas

No, not a republican- not even US! And I'm generally not very angry- 'cept when someone turns up with a (personal) iPhone they haven't consulted us about and ask us to configure webmail! :) @DWFields- never used Virtual PC in that capacity. Dave was ok, but like you said so much easier since OS X accepted smb shares natively. Saves having to install the Macintosh bit on Windows servers! Have tried installing OS X onto my VMWare workstation 8 set-up but no luck (despite trying a couple of hacks) so will just make do with every other OS under the sun...

ccardona54
ccardona54

Did you delete my first post because it criticized you? Figures, it takes being an adult to be able to accept criticism. :-P

DWFields
DWFields

I'm sure everybody here has heard that any Samsung Galaxy phone (with the exception of the Nexus) and many others that use the TouchWiz UI can now be taken down by a single line of code--a single line that can be triggered by a QR code, an NFC tag or even an SMS message. Taken down. Bricked. Unusable until manually re-activated at a carrier store. Yet the iPhone keeps hiking along, bringing in more followers every year--despite the distractions caused by all those hookers.

DWFields
DWFields

Then again, apparently I like a wider variety of programming than you. Speaking on the iPhone 5--as usual, I was right; the disappointed are the ones who planned to be disappointed. Everyone else seems quite happy with it as demonstrated by both record-setting pre-orders and a record-breaking first weekend. That so-called "dock" issue certainly won't affect the vast majority of iPhone/iPod users and most people are having to really search to find things wrong with Maps (Come on now. I've seen just as bad on Google Earth and they've been at it for years!) As for that short-stock excuse--yes, I said excuse--it just doesn't make economical sense. To make it worse, you then proceed to exaggerate it by more than doubling the supposed numbers. Apple reported over 5 million iPhone 5s sold over the weekend and Apple did not publicly forecast any sales estimates. The one estimate that everybody latched onto was from Gartner--a company whose forecasts are notoriously wrong--they haven't even been close for years. Sure, the forecast sounded great, but last year's sales numbers only showed a 25% increase from the previous year's launch and most polls only implied a 20% increase this year. Forecasting a 100% increase went beyond optimistic into the ludicrous. Apple has not claimed a sell-out as you are implying, though there have been claims from some carrier shops that they were short-stocked; I'd like to know more before I come to any conclusions there. 5 million is still 5 million and no other manufacturer has ever claimed 5 million units of an electronic product sold in its first weekend that I know of. That kind of sales makes the Galaxy SIIIs numbers pale by comparison. Final comment: If Apple's sales only came from marketing, why is it that every year they sell to more people? If it were only marketing and there was no satisfaction behind that product, there would be no repeat customers and launches would be less each year, not more. Making the excuse of "Apple market like demons" flat ignores the fact that once people buy Apple products, few ever choose to leave.

DWFields
DWFields

Not only that, overall their cost to the consumer is lower as the consumer pays for what they want without having to accept more or less than they want. The connector change is really a very small item in the overall scheme of things and quite honestly I see it as just another excuse to bad-mouth Apple without knowing the facts behind the change. Just because some zealots say "Apple only changed the connector to milk more money out of their users" doesn't make that statement any truer. They complained just as loudly about the bigger connector when it was introduced in place of the iPod's original FireWire connector. It's there for a very functional reason, whether you want to believe that or not.

DWFields
DWFields

Maybe you're just doing it wrong. 1. Attaching photos to email: Ok, honestly I don't try that too often; I don't use my iPhone or my iPad as my primary email device unless I'm away from my desktop (I spend a minimum of 12 hours per day at my desk.) However, if you know you're going to attach a specific photo to an email, then why not just click the photo, select 'email photo', address it and write your email text from there? It even gives you a choice of what size to make the image when you send it. Couldn't be simpler. Of course, if you're wanting to send several images at the same time, I might agree with you but I just experimented and found I could send any number of images from my iPhone just touching and holding the first image to bring up the 'Copy' button and selecting a number of images, then touching "Share" to email it. Hardly any more difficult. B. I might agree, but honestly I've never had the need or the reason to even try. If sharing photos is so easy, I doubt sharing PDFs is any more difficult, though you might need to manually enter the recipient's address rather than just touching 'Reply'. C. I'm not sure I understand this excuse. What do you mean by "collapsing folders"? Getting to a folder view is quite easy (just touch the 'Mailboxes' button) and you can open any of the other available mailboxes individually. Certainly not difficult. 2(a, b, and C). Restrictive nature of using iDevice as storage: Umm... It's not intended to be a "storage device"? It's a fully-functioning nano-computer--capable of processing data on its own. You want a separate storage device? There are tons of far-less-expensive portable drives and Flash drives that serve that purpose more readily. Even so, there is software readily available to let you do that on the iPhone if you want. I really don't understand the desire. 3(a and b). Now I know you don't know what you're talking about. I share screens and videos (including Keynote/PowerPoint presentations) using my iPhone or a first-gen iPad through an sVGA projector on a regular basis. Admittedly, if the new iPhone does drop the sVGA contacts from the new connector you'll probably have to use a wireless receiver on your projector. A simple $20 cable is readily available and the AppleTV makes a good wireless set-top box if you just have to go wireless. Either way is still cheaper than most alternates I'm aware of. 4. VPN -- Are you trying to VPN into the phone, or out? Certainly VPN is available in iOS and I do believe it works for the iPhone as well as the iPad; however, most people want to VPN out of the device to a desktop and that's certainly easy, though some network settings don't permit mobile VPN too readily. 5. By "Network Browsing" I must assume you mean 'finding other computers on the network." Honestly, that's not the purpose of a smartphone nor is it the purpose of a tablet--yet. Smartphones are PC supplemental devices, not yet full PC replacements--at least for the enterprise. Why do that when you can VPN back to a desktop that already has that access? 7. WiFi issues seem to be quite device independent; I read of even Samsung Galaxy III models having WiFi issues. From what I've been able to glean from research, more often the issue belongs to the network settings on the router rather than any phone-specific issues. This could be something as simple as placement of the antennae around the building, too. 8. Ok, up until recently PHONES were not intended to be playing STEREO music through Bluetooth headphones. This is especially hazardous when driving or walking as you simply won't hear even a train coming up on you to run you down. Really, you're promoting a very dangerous habit. 9. PDF reading compatibility. Hmmm... Let me try that right now. Hmmm... worked with absolutely no problem for me. I emailed a PDF to myself and opened it in my iPhone 4 and was able to read it, zoom in and out, turn, do almost anything with it I can any other type of image. I certainly didn't notice any data missing. Maybe you forgot to download the rest of the data? 10. Well, you're getting that wish--I think. Stylii you can buy anywhere, you're supposedly getting a "bigger screen" and as far as Bluetooth keyboards are concerned, I think they're unnecessary for a phone but the iPad is quite capable of using any Bluetooth keyboard on the market. Overall, it seems that lack of effort on your part or simply lack of desire to try is all that's keeping you from making the iPhone a viable tool in your office. I'm using 2-year-old iDevices to do everything you say can't be done.

dl_wraith
dl_wraith

I AM!! I have to admit, the whole 'patent battle' crap is really beginning to grate. Surely there's a better way to protect your products yet allow the tech to move forward? Right now the patent system seems to be helping to stifle the flow of new products. Are we allowing companies to broad a patent? Are we being too vague with what's being allowed in?

awgiedawgie
awgiedawgie

This is a remarkably childish response on your own part. But then your earlier post saying "Most people are just plain stupid!" wasn't exactly mature, either. You accuse others of hatred, and yet your comments are brimming with it - a fine example of the pot calling the kettle black.

HAL 9000
HAL 9000

I have a [b]iRection[/b] now with all this talk of those Sexy Apples. Doesn't it make you feel all warm and tingly? :D Pity they are more Fashion than Substance, but if this is any help at the Hospital Yesterday I watched as 3 people Bricked their iPhones by pulling other stuff out of their Hand-bags and their phones fell out onto the floor and cracked. Another young girl did the same thing to her iPad though it wasn't in her handbag but on a seat and it fell when she got up. Strange thing is that I didn't see any others drop their phones just the iUsers. There where a heap of them dropping their phones all iUsers, and 3 of them bricked their phones and all said well now I can get a new iPhone 5 and used that as an excuse for bricking their phones. Seems that those 4S iPhones are really fragile but they look so nice. :^0 Col [/sarcasm]

HAL 9000
HAL 9000

You are going to rush out and buy all of those docks that will be useless with the next model won't you? The point here is that in an environment with Limited Resources dumping masses of product simply because it's gone out of fashion is a very bad idea. Recycle the junk by all means but at the moment that's not happening and those Precious Metals and other items are all being wasted. Currently the biggest Gold Mine in the Southern Hemisphere mines commercial amounts of Gold at 3 Grams of Gold per tom of earth. A ton of Scrap iPhones will yield something like 16 Grams of Gold and that is only one of the many limited resources being wasted. OH and incidentally I'm currently doing a bit of work at a CAM Plant who makes equipment for the Power Generation Industry. Their newest CAM Machine is 6 years old well most of the inside of the factory is 6 years old because when they replaced their equipment they have to strip the insides of the Plant and take it off line for about a year. Those CAM Machines things like 40 Foot Bed Lathes and Armature Winders all run on DOS and that's unlikely to be changed in the foreseeable future. Also those 6 Year Old Machines are still the current Model in most cases. I'm not saying that the Industrial Robot Makers have the right idea but it certainly makes it easier to get spares and keep the things running. ;) Col

ricardoc
ricardoc

To paraphrase myself... neither you nor Steve Jobs nor anybody for that matter will dictate how users (myself included) can do things with a device that has the capabilities both in software and hardware to do what we want. That stuck up way of thinking is part of the culture Apple and some of its fans try to impose on others and honestly I dont understand why. With that out the way lets go over your answers. 1.Attaching photos to email: Ok, honestly I don't try that too often; I don't use my iPhone or my iPad as my primary email device unless I'm away from my desktop (I spend a minimum of 12 hours per day at my desk.) So if that is the case what entitles you to say Im doing it wrong? Let me tell you, not only I speak for myself, I also speak for a wide user base that does spend a lot of time on the phone and use it as their primary email device. Furthermore the way you are explaining how to do what we want is not the solution as it breaks our business operation mode. You see, the ability to attach a file (PDF, picture, etc) to a reply (not a new message) is needed when the reply is part of a conversation thread that needs to have all the details of whats being said and proposed. Breaking the thread with a new email just to send an attachment defeats the whole purpose of the conversation mode; you sir might know how to use the iPhone for personal stuff but you dont know much about business use. Same applies for PDF or any other document, so I wont go on a long explanation. "C. I'm not sure I understand this excuse. What do you mean by "collapsing folders"?" Again for those doing business, organizing electronic correspondence in folders is key to managing it in better way. Folders created by project, sender, time period, or any other criteria, creates a tree of folders that when it is fairly deep or long feels up the screen on the iPhone and needs to be scrolled up and down to find the appropriate email. Being able to collapse the folders will make the scrolling less painful. It is not mailboxes, it is folders nested inside the mailboxes; get it now? "2(a, b, and C). Restrictive nature of using iDevice as storage: Umm... It's not intended to be a "storage device"? It's a fully-functioning nano-computer--capable of processing data on its own." Ill get back later to that definition, but still who cares what the intention was? It is a phone, it is a computer, it has storage and I want to use them all. Also I dont want to load more crap software on my computer just so I can drop some files to the iPhone; not only that, all this software you talk about have their app companion that is the only one that can see those files later on the phone; files that wont be accessible to other apps such as the mail app. Bottom line I can do it with an Android device which happens to be also an smartphone; is the iPhone a limited version of smartphone? "3(a and b). Now I know you don't know what you're talking about. I share screens and videos (including Keynote/PowerPoint presentations) using my iPhone or a first-gen iPad through an sVGA projector on a regular basis." Well you dont know because probably you cant read. I said I want to share the screen not only for pictures or presentation but for other apps, or just the screen with all the apps. I also explained a use case scenario, but apparently you were too eager to rebuke my post and didnt read properly. Being able to share the screen for a video or presentation but not for the entire screen is plain stupid and it means that the Apples gurus have a very narrow view of how people interact with or might use their devices. Think training and working with the phone as your sole computer; thats what I mean by sharing the screen. 4. VPN -- Are you trying to VPN into the phone, or out? Who said anything about VPN? Please take your time and read properly! I want to remote connect to a phone, not from the phone to a computer. Your statement most people want to VPN out of the device to a desktop shows that you dont know too many people in the IT world that are in charge of supporting users. "5. By "Network Browsing" I must assume you mean 'finding other computers on the network." Honestly, that's not the purpose of a smartphone nor is it the purpose of a tablet--yet. Smartphones are PC supplemental devices, not yet full PC replacements--at least for the enterprise." Here you are assuming (one more time) your own environment applies to everyone, why? Also you mentioned earlier and I quote It's a fully-functioning nano-computer--capable of processing data on its own. . Nano, micro or full blown, who cares? It can be use as one, and dont tell me about any intended purposes; the purposes of those devices keep changing by the users demand, not what any phone producer thinks it should be. Also, if the phone has connection to the network and all I want is to quickly check a file on a network share, do you really think that RDP to a desktop just to access that file is the most effective way to do it? You either have a lot of time on you hands or your work environment must be very relaxed. 6. What happened to this one, no opinion? Or do you agree with me but can afford to say it in public? There is nothing wrong with loving something and have a critic thought about it. "7. WiFi issues..." I dont know the causes, but other devices (read not iPhones) dont have these issues, at least in our environment; coincidence? "8. Ok, up until recently PHONES were not intended to be playing STEREO music through Bluetooth headphones. This is especially hazardous when driving or walking as you simply won't hear even a train coming up on you to run you down. Really, you're promoting a very dangerous habit." Your habit of supposing, telling others their intended use of the iPhone is what is really dangerous. People listen to music in other environments other than driving or walking and they do it already with stereo wired headphones. I dont see why using BT stereo ones is any different in this respect. Your reaction to this point shows that you will find any edge to in order to not accept critics to your beloved device. Please stop being ridiculous. "9. PDF reading compatibility. Hmmm... Let me try that right now. Hmmm... worked with absolutely no problem for me." So you just tried once and thats it. Well try to gather information about that over a hundred of users that receive an average of 15-20 PDF attachment a day over email; then come back to me. Many users complains of having issues with PDF prompted us to test the same attachments on Android and regular computer (via forwarding) and it worked every time in those platforms. "10. Well, you're getting that wish--I think. Stylii you can buy anywhere, you're supposedly getting a "bigger screen" and as far as Bluetooth keyboards are concerned, I think they're unnecessary for a phone..." Again "I think" is not what others think. If I can share the screen as previously mentioned and have a KB connected then I can use the iPhone as my only device; I understand that this goes against the Apple strategy to stuff up every user with more than one device but companies work on budgets. Example of what I mean: Motorola Atrix. "Overall, it seems that lack of effort on your part or simply lack of desire to try is all that's keeping you from making the iPhone a viable tool in your office. I'm using 2-year-old iDevices to do everything you say can't be done." Overall it seems that your poor knowledge of the business world together with your really narrow view of others and your imposing attitude of what others should do is what is keeping you for understanding that a product might be good for you but not necessarily will meet the expectations and needs of others. Thanks, Edited for accuracy.

r.j.thomas
r.j.thomas

....maybe iOS is non-intuitive to the majority of the population? Which would be kinda funny, seeing as how Apple was supposed to be the best at figuring out intuitive UI etc.

DWFields
DWFields

... to defend designs and methods they create. The problem with software patenting is that, as you said, many of these patents are too vague. It used to be that an individual or company had to demonstrate a working model (scale or full-size) of the device to be patented so the differences between existing and new technologies could be readily seen. In many ways, this is much harder to do with software and quite honestly Apple got bit 25 years ago by copyright law which should have served the same purpose for software that it does for print publication. The few places Apple succeeded in its old copyright litigation were where Apple could prove the code was a direct copy of their own. I personally believe that patents again should required live demonstration of how the submission works before ever even accepting the application. And no, I don't care who gets turned down if that technology does prove to be too much like something already patented.

Deadly Ernest
Deadly Ernest

is that too many apples cause the runs, and this is very true of the early season apples before they're fully ripe. Once you take that into account, it explains a lot of what goes on with Apple.

DWFields
DWFields

My case is a Mophie--protection AND backup battery in one. Not a counterfeit, but an authorized accessory on a real iPhone 4--that has served flawlessly for 2 years--no cracks, no breaks and no returns.

HAL 9000
HAL 9000

[b]How can Mankind live without a Retina Display and a Life App?[/b] After all most of the Apple Lovers can not make any decision without Apple telling them what they need. Actually on a more serious note I find it amusing just how many times some people will have their 4S repaired [i]read that as new Backs and fronts[/i] and then buy another that's likely to suffer the same fate, though I have to admit that the 5 looks easier to repair than the 4 is. ;) Col ]:)

HAL 9000
HAL 9000

One of the genuine reasons why Apple is upset you have a Counterfeit, probably produced at the same Foxconn factory but coming out a different door. Still not a great reason to blame Samsung for cloning their designs when it's not Samsung doing it. ;) Incidentally here at least all 4 & 4S have the Apple Logo on the back which was what I was meaning. Actually the 3 was nasty to repair as it has at least one really nasty fitting inside it, possibly more depending on how heavy handed you may be, but it was great compared to the 4. :0 Col

DWFields
DWFields

wasn't visible, hmmm? I can tell you that I own one of those--a 4 with no visible logo. It doesn't even look like an iPhone--until you look at the screen.

HAL 9000
HAL 9000

Which resulted in a cut to one of the owners. They just pulled their Sim cards and what amounted to Binned them after that. Glass Front & Rear on the 4 series is a weak point. Well I'm assuming that they where Apple Products as they had the Apple Logo on them. I haven't seen any Samsung whatever with the half eaten fruit as part of the phone. ;) Col

DWFields
DWFields

I also find it hard to believe they were 'bricked', since if one can fall more than 2000 feet and still operate through shattered glass well enough for Find My iPhone to work and even make calls from it--well, the tale sounds a little "too good to be true" for the Androidies. If it's Too Good To Be True, well, you know the end of that sentence.

DWFields
DWFields

It really wouldn't be all that hard to create a dock adaptor for their docking unit that simply raises the iPhone/iPod Touch a little higher while still fitting into the older device. I'll grant that most companies will be adapting the entire device to the new connector, but they're not going to flat abandon the old until the iPhone 4 and 4S are no longer sold. I expect dock-to-phone adaptors originally shifting to phone-to-dock adaptors later. BTW, I'm talking about adaptors by the docking-device manufacturers, not Apple's white adaptors which are already sold out even prior to the iPhone itself being released.

ricardoc
ricardoc

I have tried to submit a comment to the collapsing folder question and no matter how I change the text the TR site won't accept the post. This is getting ridiculous... I'm really sorry.

ricardoc
ricardoc

My comments, 2,4,5,6,7- “I believe (in fact, I'm certain of this) Apple designs its products to the majority of people. Most of these people are non-technical of mind, using tools as they come without any desire to modify them once turned on” I was speaking for myself and some of my users when I was expressing my disappointment. I do understand that nothing can be everything for everyone; hence a few of us are moving to Android phones at the end of this month. 3.I’ll get my hands on a 4S and check the video output capabilities and get back to you. 8.I understand all your safety concerns, though I do not understand your reasoning (from the safety point of view) of BT versus wired. Personally I don’t use either; I was adding some of my users complains. There is definitely a benefit of using less power out of the battery, but it should be the prerogative of the users to turn off or on BT radio as they already do with other services that shorten battery life. Apple and for that matter any other phone maker, should not put themselves in the nanny position where they get to choose what they believe is best for users as every person has different needs and tastes. This of course unless you’re talking about a batlant safety risk or harm to the users. 9.I’ll find the offending attachments and send them out to you. 10. Apologies accepted; thanks for that. The number of issues described by me here are the result of our experience with a mostly iOS shop (iPhone 4). As some of our users will migrate to Android soon I will have more base criteria to compare both platforms. Maybe we can re-take the discussion in one year or so. We will check Windows phone for sure as we like to test everything; our wireless carrier’s rep always gives us the opportunity to do so. Thanks,

ricardoc
ricardoc

@ Slayer: the link I was providing was for an Apple Community Support site; TR is in trouble if the Apple sites aren't allowed. I'll try to repost without the link. Thanks, Update: tried to post without the link - no dice. WTF? OK this is very weird. I succeeded in submitting most of my post (by editing) but there is a part where I refer to the collapsing folders and after I add it and submitted it the post was removed completely. There are no special symbols other that parentheses and comments; what is going on?

Slayer_
Slayer_

Posts that have links to "unapproved" sites get automatically deleted. Also, the bad word filter tends to catch words that have the bad words in them.

ricardoc
ricardoc

I have tried to post at least three times but every time my post "disappears" and no matter what I do (restart browser, PC, try with other browser) I can't see the post. Twice the system has told me the post is not accepted because it is a duplicate, but where the heck is it? OK, this one was accepted, the other longer one was not; is there a limit to what I can post? Actually I realized is not about how long the post is; it is just not accepting anything even if I try to post it in chunks; which is plain weird since I can post and edit this one. Edited to update status.

DWFields
DWFields

1.) It is possible to copy/paste text from another email, that is hand-addressed, but I do understand you want improved simplicity and apparently the gmail app meets your needs. Well and good. As far as iOS limiting the number of images sent, I have not run into that issue other than receiving complaints from receiving servers that the combined attachments are too big. Some mail servers still limit email attachments to about 1-2 Meg total. On the other hand, I thought I did discuss the "collapsing folders" question early on, but apparently my definition differs from yours. Please clarify. 2. I believe (in fact, I'm certain of this) Apple designs its products to the majority of people. Most of these people are non-technical of mind, using tools as they come without any desire to modify them once turned on. This is why the old "flashing led clock" meme ran so rampant on VCRs and why even now you'll find TVs in homes still running in demo mode. Simply put: In their minds, if it works, don't monkey with it. Working towards that mindset, Apple tries to make each function as easily as possible with the least amount of initial setup they can manage. Yes, this does have the effect of limiting some capabilities, but it is also one of the reasons Apple's phones have been the top-selling phones for so long. Usually, you can find some app or other workaround (short of jailbreaking the device) that lets you do what you want. I realize this still falls short of some people's needs--Android does fill this gap nicely--but it serves well for the majority. 3. The iPhone 4S I believe and the latest iPad have that capability as far as I've been able to determine. In fact, that was one of the features highly touted during one of the keynote speeches. Since I personally have an iPhone 4, a first-gen iPad and a much older Epson projector, I admit there are some things I cannot display. The technology has surpassed my current availability. When I do purchase my next iPhone upgrade (the 5 model in about 3-4 months) I will be attempting exactly the sort of thing we're discussing due to my work with a major charity organization. 4. Ah. An error in understanding. My apologies. Now that I do understand, I understand also that there are some business apps that do give you that kind of access to the phones in your network. I'm afraid that I don't know their names, but that is one of the issues that IT has brought up and that Apple has, I believe, helped to arrange especially for company-owned iPads. Since I work with individuals and not group sessions, I don't have a need for such and as such will admit I don't know where to point you. I just know that group management applications are available. 5, 6 & 7. I think I will refer you to the "most common denominator" reply in 2. above as to why certain functions may not be included. Again, I do acknowledge that the iPhone isn't for everybody, but I still say that the iPhone can do a lot more than the majority of Android 'fanatics' are willing to acknowledge. They're equal, but different. To me that's good. I'm willing to recommend the latest versions of Android to anyone who really needs that kind of capability, but the majority of people who argue about it don't really seem to know what they're arguing about. With that, I believe many of those who don't buy Apple simply because it's Apple will switch FROM Android to Windows Phone 8, especially when it proves better integration with Windows PCs than Android currently offers. 8. Wired headphones are significantly more obvious to the eye (especially when using Apple's white earbuds) and often uncomfortable and annoying when driving or performing any kind of manual task. Bluetooth also draws more power from the battery (it is a radio system, after all) which hurts usable charge duration. The more the user is required to leave at least one ear unobstructed in use as a phone, the better the chance is that that user will hear an oncoming train. Even if I'm wrong about the reasoning for safety, I do see a safety benefit along with the battery endurance benefit. Since I rarely use headphones of any kind except when sitting at my desk or listening to music in bed, the so-called 'need' for stereo Bluetooth headphones is simply nonsensical and, to me, dangerous. 9. I believe you can email me through the Private Messages link when you click my username beside my nonexistent avatar. If I know they're coming, I will try to ensure I receive them through my iPhone first. 10. When you read these boards on a regular basis and see nothing but attacks based on false information, then you're going to want to defend the product you use. As this discussion has continued, I hope you have noticed that I am truly trying to understand your reasoning and will acknowledge when I don't know something and when I am in error. I ask that you forgive the harshness of my initial response. That said, I am still puzzled by the number of issues you describe based on my own and others' (friends and clients') experiences with the iPhone as compared to Android phones up to now. The "hard reset" for the iPhone seems much easier than it does for most Android phones (remove battery, hit power button, re-install battery, hit power button)(note: I've watched many Android users do this--more than once at some meetings) but as I say, I've never seen any iPhone user need to perform that reset in public. That, to me, speaks of far higher reliability than most Android phones. I will acknowledge that most causes of crashes are software oriented though as I acknowledged earlier, even I have a dead 'home' button on my iPad which even after more than a year with the problem hasn't affected my use of the iPad since using Gestures still gets me to the home screen just as easily as well as accessing all associated modes including the "task bar" at the bottom. It is possible that your users work them more extensively than I work mine, but that shouldn't account for high RMA numbers. I would ask that, if you can, compare those RMAs to any Android RMAs over the same time period. I could also recommend taking a good look at WP8 phones when they come out to see if they could work with your organization even easier. Personally, if you're a primary Windows environment, you might find it a better choice.

ricardoc
ricardoc

I will start from the end of your post. "My arguments here are to people who insist Apple's products CAN'T do what they obviously CAN do." Well my argument with you is that you insist in telling me that the iPhone can do what I want and then telling me how by explaining something different. Case in point: 1. I never said I could not files (pictures and others) attached to a message; I said attaching those to a REPLY is cumbersome or impossible. (at this point I really don't know how to make sure you understand the difference, even after I took the care to explain why we would like to reply to a message instead of just writing a new one). You either are wilfully ignoring what I say or you don't want to recognize the issue. In the case of pictures if you are reading an email and need to reply to it with attached pictures you have to: a) close the mail app, b) go to the pictures and select the ones you need to attach and select copy from the share button, c) go back to the mail app and open the email and select "reply" and then paste the pictures in the body of the email. I see two problems with this: a) there is a limit on how many pictures you can select to copy (not set by the mail app but by the iOS), b) pasting pictures to the body of an email is not accepted as the best way to send then over email (don't forget I'm talking business here). As for other types of files I welcome you to explain how I can attach a PDF (for example) to a REPLY of a message. By the way, this is not trying to do it "the Windows Way", the way I want (and my users) to do it can be done using the Gmail app ON THE IPHONE, meaning the native mail app (which is my complain) is LIMITED. The other types of documents can't be attached to replies in Gmail app because there is no "folder" to look for them which is a limitation of iOS not the app. Regarding the mail app, I didn't see any mention to the folders being able to be collapsed; any comments? 2. Yes that is my prerogative and since it can be done with other smartphones I don't see why Apple has to be condescendent with the "stupid user that doesn't know better" and not allow this; as if we were all dumb. 3.Are you saying that you can attach via cable your iPhone (any model) to a monitor (projector, etc) and show for example the maps, or the messaging app? If that's the case please tell me how. One more thing we are talking about iPhone here, no need to mix with what the iPad can do. Note that I do want to share anything the iPhone has on the screen, on any app; I explained why already. 4. "Ok then. Why would you want to 'remote connect in' when the thing's right in your pocket." Now I'm totally sure that you either have a problem reading or are ignoring what I say. Yes, my phone is on "my pocket", the other 100 I need to support are not; those are the ones I would like to connect to, so I can check problems and miss-configurations. The goal here is to facilitate support; I trust that you know what IT support is. 5. No, Android phones up to version 2.6 can't do that either with the apps included by default (Android native); but that shouldn't stop me for wanting it on the iPhone, should it? 6. I see we kind of agree on something. 7. I will leave this one for now; I honestly don't have any prof as in results from a thorough test, I just have a bunch of users complains. 8. This is the part I love from your explanation: "I believe Apple is trying to reduce that risk by some little bit." Exactly how? Are they removing the audio jack altogether from the phone? Because the way I see it listening to music on headphones using wired ones is not less dangerous than doing it on BT ones; heck I could even argue that BT will be safer because you won't get tangled with any wires. Could you please explain me exactly how Apple is making this world safer by not providing the ability to have stereo audio over BT but leaving the audio jack on the phone? 9. Do you have an email I can send them too? 10. Yes, you are totally right, this is an opinion board after all; and that's what I did when I said in my original post "Guarantee to disappointing if..." but then you attacked me by saying "Maybe you're doing it wrong...". The fact that your bank uses the phone and serve them well does not means it fits other business needs; different business operate different. To conclude you said "but Android is not for me because I don't need to waste my time constantly troubleshooting software problems that cause lock-ups, crashes and freezes. I do know ICS is much improved, but I still read reviews that say it's choppy and "unfinished". In four years of owning iPhones I've had one of them crash ONCE and the other NEVER." I must say you're a very lucky man; In the three years now supporting around a hundred of iPhone I can say that I have experienced quite a few problems (a user just came by while I was writing this post to complain his iPhone home button didn't work - it took a reboot to fix it - does that count as a freeze or problem?). I have had phones that go black for no reason (solution is to press home and sleep button for 30s up until the Apple symbol appears); another is apps opening and closing right away. I just checked my records and I have 10% RMA on iPhone devices during the last two years. Nah, it might just be anecdotal or my users are the dumbest. Thanks,

DWFields
DWFields

1. Sending photos. It took me less than one minute to figure out how to send a photo with text attached. It took me less than two more to figure out how to send as many as I wanted in a single email. Just because you're used to doing things the hard way doesn't mean it has to be difficult. 2. If you want to use it like a hard drive, that's definitely your prerogative. That doesn't mean I have to understand it. I've told you it can be done with the iPhone, though it's different from the Android method. Me? I don't want to risk plugging my smartphone into somebody else's computer where it could get corrupted by some Windows malware. At least an thumb drive is smaller, faster as a hard drive, larger capacity (because it doesn't share space with OS and Apps) and is lockable. 3. And again I say that what you want is fully capable with the newer models of both iPhone and iPad. 4. Ok then. Why would you want to 'remote connect in' when the thing's right in your pocket. Or are you trying to move files and do things that Apple's products do naturally without needing to manually synch it? 5. So you're telling me your Android already does this? Or are you waiting for the Windows 8 models which will have better interconnectivity than Android does with either OS? 6. Believe it or not, I didn't see the need to argue that. I fully understand that point and while there are workarounds (like emailing the item to be printed to a specific printer--both HP and Dell printers offer this) it's not what you're looking for. Still, the technology for that is coming. 7. I still think its a setting in the router rather than the phone--especially if it affects more than one phone simultaneously. I do admit that the Wi-Fi radio in the iPhones are a little different from others which might cause the problem, but at least the new model is capable all the way up to 802.11n 8. Headphones, except in an office or home environment, is absolutely dangerous no matter the brand. I live near a college that straddles railroad tracks and lately not a semester goes by where I don't hear of at least one student getting hit by a train because they were wearing headphones. While I understand you may not appreciate it, I believe Apple is trying to reduce that risk by some little bit. 9. Well, if you want to send me those 10-20 pdfs and let me try them, I'll be happy to help you troubleshoot. That is my business after all. It seemed pretty straightforward and easy to me, but then, maybe some of those pdfs have privacy controls on them that need to be set on the receiving phone. 10. Well, these are opinion boards after all. At least I acknowledge them as opinions based on personal experience. That personal experience puts me in contact with one of the biggest banks in the world who, by the way, uses iPhones and iPads as well as other products for their management and staff. Regretfully for some, Android is not included in those other products due to known security issues. Windows Phone 8 might be a different story. My arguments here are to people who insist Apple's products CAN'T do what they obviously CAN do. Most people who say it can't perform themselves simply don't know how to make it work--and usually it's because they tried to do it "the Windows Way". I do not deny that Android has other capabilities--but Android is not for me because I don't need to waste my time constantly troubleshooting software problems that cause lock-ups, crashes and freezes. I do know ICS is much improved, but I still read reviews that say it's choppy and "unfinished". In four years of owning iPhones I've had one of them crash ONCE and the other NEVER. In two and a half years of owning an iPad, it's crashed twice and I do believe with that one that it has hardware issues because the home key doesn't work. Interestingly, I don't need the Home key as Gestures gets me there just as quickly.

DWFields
DWFields

However, the shape of the keyboard, the size of the frame and other factors can influence how severely, if at all, you can be affected. I, myself have recently developed a problem with the little finger of my right hand by using a certain brand of mouse when gaming which I thought felt great as I was using it--but after several months of use I discovered that I've torn a ligament in my pinkie finger by gripping the mouse too tightly as I moved it--and this is a big, stout mouse, not one of those tiny mobility mouses. The simple fact that finger became essential in the tight control of that mouse (incremental shifts for aiming the target pipper of a game) caused the problem and I've had to back off to a different, non-gaming trackball that puts no stress on the finger at all. Strangely for you perhaps, I use a trackpad for my everyday computing where the finger is almost never used--though I am a touch-typist using one of Apple's "chicklet" keyboards to type several thousand words a day with no pain or CPS.

Deadly Ernest
Deadly Ernest

keyboard tight, that's a user error. The study or ergonomics teaches us how to use it right, which I have been doing for over 30 years and never suffered from CTS.

DWFields
DWFields

Believe it or not, people have tried designing different styles of keyboards and mice for less stress on the hands and arms; they were too different in appearance and often to expensive in price to gain any real following. One of those mice looked something like a gaming joystick held at a 45-degree angle and the keyboards had extreme curvatures that prevented them from fitting in the typical keyboard drawer due to the height of the central 'hump'. Hold your hand out relaxed in front of you and you should see that it rests at about a 30-degree to 45-degree angle, not flat on the desk. As for the speech thing, quite honestly things are improving. One of the first experiments I tried when I installed Mountain Lion on my 5-year-old iMac was the voice dictation system (designed by the same people who created Dragon Dictate). It was remarkably accurate to what I said each time, but the system currently relies on sending that voice to one of Apple's huge database/server farms and returning the text, which takes about 20 seconds or so round trip. It works functionally in any text-entry field both in on-machine client software and on-line web pages and such. I could, if I chose, use it even to comment on these boards, but I prefer to think about what I'm saying as I type it so I don't have to edit as completely before submitting. The accuracy is good, the speed is improving and it's only a matter of time that Nick's little letter will truly say, "Dear Mrs. Kardashian, thank you for your trust in our new product..."

NickNielsen
NickNielsen

"Computer, display last speech entry" "Deer misses car dash ian, fan queue four urine trust in our gnu product..."

Slayer_
Slayer_

He said "Just avoid holding it that way."

ricardoc
ricardoc

I would like to know how what does he mean by "when 2 and 3 year old kids learn how to use it..." Does that means that DWFields believes that those kids have the same use for the iPhone as professionals do? Well unless those professionals are just tapping like crazy to play Angry birds and see some pictures I guess.... I thought I was clearly talking from the business point of view but I guess I'm too confident with my English skills.

DWFields
DWFields

I said "when they can" which means they get their hands on mommy or daddy's iPhone or iPad and can use it at that age, then it is quite intuitive. Maybe your habits have overrun your intuition. Just because something is done a certain way doesn't mean that's necessarily the only way or even the best way. What does Carpal Tunnel syndrome say about our keyboards and mice, for instance? Yes, they do feel natural to us because we've used them for 30 years (mice) or 130 years (keyboards/typewriters--or even longer). The fact that people are having hand and arm problems means that those keyboards and mice are not the best way; they were, however, the only form of reliable textual and pointing I/O available for a long time. Speech and pointing are far more natural and eventually even the keyboard will be completely obsolete as voice recognition and touch get faster and more accurate.

Slayer_
Slayer_

Until then, its unintuitive for us older folk.

DWFields
DWFields

I don't think the problem is a lack of intuitiveness.

DWFields
DWFields

I could point out right now hundreds of different boycotts that are having no effect on the businesses boycotted--one of those is Home Depot simply because HD supports lifestyle diversity. HD is still one of the biggest and most profitable home improvements stores in America; right beside Lowe's. A boycott on Apple would fail because the majority of those boycotting already don't buy Apple's products so would have literally no impact .

r.j.thomas
r.j.thomas

I think it's more than grating, it could be damaging if entire markets stop buying from a company in protest. ?

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