IT Employment

Why the IT department needs more women

CIOs need to tackle the IT department's embarrassing shortfall of female staff, or risk falling out of step with the prevailing mood in the boardroom.

As companies face pressure to bring more women into senior roles the overwhelmingly male IT department is likely to increasingly stick out like a sore thumb, CIOs have been warned.

When it comes to gender diversity the make-up of the IT department is embarrassingly one-sided. Only around one in 10 CIOs is a woman and a recent survey of tech chiefs found that less than one quarter of their IT managers were female.

Tackling gender inequality at the top of business is becoming more of a priority for corporations, as voluntary groups like the 30% Club in the UK and lobbying bodies such as 2020 in the US work to bring more women into the boardroom.

IT chiefs that want to keep step with the prevailing mood among the execs should start thinking about how to redress the balance of the sexes, said Gartner VP Mark Raskino, who flags the issue in his report Three Boardroom Trends CIOs Should Watch With Care.

"If you get a mood in the boardroom of companies that is saying 'Gender imbalance is a bad thing', which is definitely happening, then the likelihood is that view will percolate down into areas of the business like IT," said Raskino.

As that mood spreads the IT department's largely male workforce will be particularly conspicuous: "The IT department is likely to be one of the most unbalanced departments," said Raskino.

"You can confidently say that if you look at most other support departments in a business - HR, legal, accounting - you will probably find a higher female workforce."

A "thoughtful, senior CIO" will, he said, try to ensure that the IT department has a balance of sexes closer to the rest of the business.

"These CIOs will look at themselves in the mirror and say 'We're not doing very well on this issue in comparison to the rest, maybe we should be a bit more thoughtful about it'.

"That will have repercussions in hiring, promotion, selection and trying to counterbalance the perception that maybe there are biases, or working and cultural practices, that are getting in the way of women moving up the ranks."

There is an argument to be made that the much of the work undertaken by the modern IT department, with its emphasis on maintaining strong relationships with service providers and the rest of the business, is better suited to women than men, he said.

"The value of IT over the last decade has shifted towards the customer interface and away from the back office administrative automation," he said.

"There are perceptions that there are a lot of soft skills that women have - conversational skills, attention skills like listening to more than one conversation at a time - that put them, on average, in a better position when it comes to doing things like account management work.

"We need more account management work - we need internal account managers and relationship managers working out of IT departments with the business and with service providers. These are all much more important in today's IT department than they would have been 20 years ago."

About

Nick Heath is chief reporter for TechRepublic UK. He writes about the technology that IT-decision makers need to know about, and the latest happenings in the European tech scene.

82 comments
lpointmpoint
lpointmpoint

If the % of women CIOs is significantly lowered that the % of women in the IT department, you might have a case. Note that this was never broached. If the department is overwhelmingly male, there is no case. Why women are choosing not to enter the field is another matter. Maybe they don't like it. As long as there is no overt barrier, they have every right to choose whatever they want. They sure seem to love HR. This article would seem to justify promoting unqualiified applicants to achieve some quota.

atkinsonphillip
atkinsonphillip

We've been told so often in the media that woman are superior communicators, can do many tasks at once and can harness the support of others better than men. As a general statement this is utterly sexist and foundationless. It is simply a mantral. The psychological sciences would say that there are as many inter gender variations as intra gender variations. It's time to accept that men and woman are different. The truth here is there is not a grand comspiracy amonst the many disparate factors that determine female career success. Stop the politically correct glossing over. Men and woman (on average) think differently. Boys gravitate to physics, chemistry, engineering and IT for a reason. They are good at these difficult topics, however unpalatable that may be to some.

judithbarry
judithbarry

I.T. is like any other male-dominated field - the military, medicine, construction, etc. Women aren't going to be embraced into the field unless they are pretty. If their looks don't qualify, they are going to have to fight to be there. Statistics show that men are better at math and science, so there is always going to be a tendency for fewer women to be interested. I was always good at math & science, a terrific diagnostician, but I always got grief from a sufficient percentage of guys because I was plain, not pretty. I enjoyed the field anyway and earned many promotions.

jkameleon
jkameleon

Nobody cares about gender imbalance among hospital nurses and teachers. Why should that be a problem in IT then? As usual, we can only guess about the real reasons. I'd say it's the following: - Women are perceived by the IT industry as more manageable - More women in the workforce provide more stable talent pool. The demand for IT talent is very volatile, and during recession, men tend to bail out from the profession. Willy nilly, they have to provide for the family, one way or another. Women, on the other hand, can be parked in the kitchen, and rehired after the end of recession.

rniland
rniland

Companies should also urgently check whether there is a embarrassing shortage of catholics, people of Scottish descent, banjo pickers, motorcyclists, vegetarians, etc. Buying into this stuff is a farce. Not every inequality is discrimination.

jonadresponse
jonadresponse

Race and gender. The war just get more complicated and irrelevant. Really. Are we going to put more regulations in place to force more females into the industry? It is really about supply and demand. Let's grow up in the boardroom and stop gender badgering!

jimmy1264
jimmy1264

Parents don't encourage their daughters to learn about technology and schools don't scholarship women into Technology training. I've been in this field for 27 years and most of women I have worked with were never in a management role with Technology. Most of the women that become CIO's become CIO's because of their business management training. And not to take a shot.....but women don't have the technically aptitude to jump into a problem that make take days to answer, nor do the like the hours you work in this field or lack of vacation time. Especially now when your being "required" to wear several hats and be happy about it as well.

agentzarkov
agentzarkov

Judging from the feedback, I hope he is writing a retraction letter right now. The NBA should be embarrassed there arent any short people! HR should be embarrassed they dont have more men! 1.2 million American have been killed in war since the 1770s. Maybe we should ONLY allow women to go to combat until that number evens out. Also, why not demand women take jobs in the most dangerous occupations? Why arent 50% of sanitation engineers women? MAN did you screw up. I am so happy to see that men are fighting back against being marginalized and discrimination against them. Go peddle your PC BS somewhere else.

agentzarkov
agentzarkov

It's funny how we are supposed to look at employees based upon merit and not race or gender, unless someone suddenly wants to hire based upon race or gender. It is very ironic that the very people who want us to live in a color blind society are the ones who now ask us to make exceptions. Your question is a sexist because it is based upon gender. Of the Top 25 most dangerous jobs, men are the majority of workers in 24 of them. This is because they CHOOSE to be and women CHOOSE not to be. (A good example is the Most Dangerous Catch TV show. I dont see a lot of women on any of those boats.) So far, a lot of women have not chosen IT as their career. Any attempts to hire people based upon gender is wrong because It will prevent someone from getting a job based upon their gender. Are we to encourage women to get involved in IT to satisfy some social engineering ideal held by management? Should we hire potentially less qualified people just because of their gender? Also, following this argument, we should make it so the NBA should cast a wider net to include more short people, or more white people. Business is a meritocracy, not a social experiment. The idea that all races and gender of people will occupy jobs representative of their % of the population is absurd. I dont care if an employee is Black, Green, Man, Woman, Gay, handicapped or whatever I just want to be able to trust them to do a job well. Shame on you for trying to use this column for politically correct engineering.

thejokker
thejokker

dude; how about being gender neutral instead of spreading gender bias? maybe there are less women in IT because most women don't want to be there? why are "progressives" trying to make square pegs fit into round holes? by trying to create gender quota's you are discriminating against men, plain and simple...

andrew232006
andrew232006

There is an argument to be made that the much of the work undertaken by the modern IT department, with its emphasis on maintaining strong relationships with service providers and the rest of the business, is better suited to men than women, he said. Well no he didn't say that, because that would be sexist. I'm all for removing barriers and discrimination against women in the industry. If more women rise to the top in the IT industry great. But affirmative action and attempting to enforce a 50/50 split in all areas only leads to sexism. While you're lifting some up because they're women, you're pushing others down because they're men.

fsilber
fsilber

Falling out-of-step with the boardroom? That's not an IT problem; getting along with the boardroom is a management problem. Is the management problem because other departments have more women? I suppose, then, the reason IT doesn't need more of certain other "underrepresented minorities" yet is because the other departments don't have many of them in top management, either; is that it? A better reason for recruiting more women into entry-level IT roles is that it will help attract the best male IT workers to the company. Many of the best ones techies are slightly autistic and have trouble meeting women; the opportunity to meet women at work would be a big recruitment attraction.

sissy sue
sissy sue

As long as you have people who are so conscious of the sex represented in any occupation.

jsargent
jsargent

My 11 year old daughter has had a nintendo ds and her own netbook since 2007. She is now started to state a preference for what career she wants to do. The list is dentist, doctor and lastly electronic engineer. She wants to be a doctor or a dentist because she wants to have her own practice (no boss over her shoulder) and her grandmother was one of first female dentists in her country. She wants lastly to be an engineer because I am an engineer and also because she likes the ds and her netbook. These days so many girls have their own ds and a netbook that, in the next 10 years, we will see the balance closing fast. Employers just want the best for the job. As far as differences between men and women it all boils down to how your mum brought you up and the example you see in the house. I do the same jobs as my wife around the home (hand down toilet included) and my daughter sees no difference. Technology will close the balance out of need.

skooboy
skooboy

Nowhere in this article does the author give one, single, reason why more women are necessary in IT. However, he does use the work "embarrass" 2 times. If there are zero women in any IT department, who's to be embarrassed? Any why be embarrassed? Nick, are you hoping the lack of women in IT is "embarrassing"? Well guess what dude, we are NOT embarrassed, in the slightest way. This "writer" (who does not deserve that title) is simply revving up his political correctness machine, by stretching any facts he can to support his hollow, empty agenda. He writes about provider relationships and account management, which are rarely IT roles, that we all know are duties handled by marketing and customer relations departments. Nick Heath should be writing for Oprah magazine or the Lifetime Network. What did you major in Nick, Women's Studies? Put down the keyboard, you're late for your nail appointment.

gechurch
gechurch

If you're pushing the agenda of 'more women in IT' then you are, by definition, not applying the rule of 'the best person for the job'. The stupid thing is that what you are therefore promoting in this article is the idea of sexual discrimination. Honestly, if a CIO in today's economic climate is sitting around being 'thoughtful' about the ratio of men and women in certain roles then they are wasting time. There are a million and one more important things they should be spending their brain power on. I'm completely with g434murray - why is it we don't ever see articles about how there's a gender imbalance in nursing, secretarial work, or teaching?

g434murray
g434murray

Their are many professions that are lop sided when it comes to gender balance, usally for a good reason.

MidnightGeek
MidnightGeek

So pressure from the board rooms are saying value a gender over qualified skills? Or is it trying to say all criteria equal between candidates choose based on gender? Or is it trying to say IT is behind in bringing female talent into the entry level ranks and mentoring them into a qualified position, never mind mentoring it's too late just promote an unqualified candidate? Or is it just about "soft skills" (Gods does that reek of sexism in the whole paragraph) ignoring the analytical capabilities, software verbal skills, multitasking organizational skills and propensity to break down into hysterical outbursts that are just as much a stereotype? Consider that the problem is that the IT office has been rather hostile to "intrusion" by even qualified women. Now the price must be paid. Considering that the "nerds" have always been on the outside of the social structure have behaved at all exclusionary is the shameful aspect. It is past time for the Boys (yes males acting like teenagers) to face the primal fears of working with equally, and even dare I say, sometimes superior skills in female counterparts. This means they will have to learn a new language, as communication is a much more robust experience with (most) women. (Think javascript vs C++) And the ladies will also have to realize that (most of) their counterparts are abjectly terrified of them as the close proximity is a new experience. Be gentle but firm, expecting them to be threatened. (rolling up a paper, hitting them on the nose while saying Bad Geek! May be tempting but is also inappropriate.) So how's that for slinging a few more stereotypes around? Either way there is a real issue and it is of preferential treatment and discrimination. Saying gender has no place as an issue in the workplace is easy. But the politically correct model is fraught with more dangers than it fixes. How to determine merit has always been (and will always be) debated. In the executive levels, politics is just a valuable a skill as technical competence. Granting someone a "handicap" bonus based on gender benefits neither the recipient or the company. Performance and ability create the successes (and profits.) While it is true there are "Naturals" out there as top performers, the critical success skills can be taught, practiced and honed through mentorship. Mentors, the challenge is now yours to re-balance the pool of qualified candidates. Ladies the challenge is yours to fight for the world you want in the technology that you love. Men the challenge is yours to cut the elitist crap. Some of these ladies are just plain better than your best skills and you need to give them the respect you give any other guy. That being said, may the best "IT Pro" win fairly. Final note - Remember it is actually possible to be guilty of discriminating against the Anglo-saxon male unfairly too. Either way the company loses.

obritik
obritik

I think gender inequality in IT is a real problem at all levels. In the two large county agency IT departments I've worked in over the past 35 years I've seen and experienced constant discrimination against women. This seems especially true if she is over 50 or a parent of young children. Women who have spent years educating themselves in general or specific areas of IT, doing volunteer IT work, taking on extra IT projects and working to gain the right experience to work in specialized areas of IT, often continue to get held back in lower level positions. I believe males are just uncomfortable or threatened somehow by female coworkers but when this happens they rob the company of benefits of someones talent, education and experience. Being stuck myself in the same position or having project and duties removed when a new manager comes in and seeing assignments given to newer male staff members who end up getting sent to me for training happens a lot. I've turned in applications and resumes loaded with my 4+ yrs college education and 35 years IT experience and get put at the top of the certification hiring lists, but then I show up to be interviewed by groups of males or maybe one female and they make polite conversation but I can already tell the interview is over. Also, in the job I'm on now I get left out important info that gets shared during off duty hours when either I'm caring for family or if I have time I don't fit in socially with the group if they are all male. I hope companies do start to pay more attention to gender equality, but at all levels, not just at the top.

jonathan_alvarez
jonathan_alvarez

Do you really think that CIOs are defined by gender?, if your response is yes, then the next question is with other jobs/roles can be defined by gender ? Are you more sexiest that the rest? Why are more males truck drivers ? Why are more females retailers ? Why are lot more females in the fashion world than males? Because people choose to do so (or the circumstances apply), have you seen a lot of females geeks, sure you don't. So how do you expect those few and well prepared woman to rise in a higher rate and males?. That is not a issue, is just a percentage.

canewshound
canewshound

The problem first starts in college course selections. Not enough women enter the IT fields in college as their major. It is likely that more males somehow end up in IT not by design then do women. That has been my observation over a few decades. An IT career is difficult due to erratic hours, evening and weekend work, etc. This makes IT a more difficult choice for women with children, especially single women. Some men have struggled with these work hours also and left the dept. However, I know several women with children who only survive at work because they have extended family nearby to take the children. These women are very good IT staffers in critical positions, with a strong work ethic. Our small IT dept. is not typical, we work primarily 8-5, M-F, no weekends unless doing a major conversion or project, so women are not discouraged when considering us. I only want the best qualified and most dedicated workers on my staff, and male/female is not a consideration when interviewing.

alliwalk
alliwalk

I few years ago, I joined a professional networking group that offered a mentoring group that seemed really promising. I found and met with a male mentor for a few months. Initially, it was really helpful, but after a while it became more obvious that he was interested in more than a professional relationship. I felt as though a level of trust had been broken and I felt really uncomfortable meeting one-on-one with him. As disappointed as I was, I had to end the mentorship. Since then, I even stayed away from a lot of the events associated with that professional group, hoping to avoid him (he was kind of a leader in that group). It may be that more women are less interested in technology overall, but for those who are or have an initial interest to find out what IT has to offer them, there's the problem of women falling as prey to their male counterparts when they're in a professional or educational setting and asking for advice or help related to work or technical studies. Keep in mind this type of thing likely happens to women in many fields, not just technical ones. Of course not all men would take advantage of a situation like this. However, it only takes a single encounter or two to enough to turn off qualified female individuals from seeking more advancement or more interest in IT, or any field, if it means that they may be subjected to this type of behavior from their male counterparts. Why should it be that when women want to advance or learn new skills, all of their mentors are male? That's one reason why IT and other fields need more women. To help encourage and mentor women as they advance and learn.

llentkow
llentkow

When I was in college, I was 1 of 2 females enrolled in the CIS program. I was the only female to make it through the program and graduate. I have also been the only female IT person at both companies I have worked at since graduation. I was also the only female to apply for the positions. There are just fewer of us (females) interested in technology then there are males.

SourC
SourC

If my personal experience is an indication of the norm then it just makes sense that there are far fewer women in IT or IT Management. I went to school for Computer Science and there were almost no women in the program. After college I took additional networking certification courses and there were almost no women in those courses. I started a job in an IT department and there was 1 woman. I moved to another company's IT department and there were women but they were only in Application Support (none were technical). In my current role I've browsed job applications for openings we had and either no women or very few applied. In order to achieve a gender balance you'd have to say, "Well we received 25 resumes from men who could be qualified, and 1 from a woman. Looks like it's her lucky day because our department is embarrassingly one-sided. We just have too many men." I'd have no problem hiring a women for the most senior level technical position in the department as long as she is the best candidate. No one is going to get a free pass though, cause I need to make sure the job is done well.

opcom
opcom

In another workplace a managerial person was hired to fill a "quota" and the simple truth is the person did nothing productive, just walked around, and asked the engineers, "what are you working on", and then would say to the engineer, "well, hurry up", or, "That won't work". -and then turn and walk away. Other times some really negative statements would be made. That was many years ago but I doubt things have gotten better when quotas are involved. Still, they could have dug up someone a little better. [b]And as for all you engineers wasting your time:[b] Hurry it up! you have other work to do. you don't need to worry about that. you can't do that. Are you going to make a carreer of that (item/test, etc)? That won't work. you don't know how to do that. you can't patent that. you didn't do that. Who really did that? --just some quotes. ^^ I always hope my manager is well qualified.

ted
ted

If you have 10 candidates for a position, lets assume that 5 of the 10 are really worth considering. Furthermore, if 2 (more likely 1) of them are women, then the odds of finding a woman who is also worth considering are not all that great. These number also show themselves in CS degree programs. I teach a course, on the side, and out of a class of 14, I had one woman last spring. In this case, she was one of the top performers in the class... But that is not always the case.

fhrivers
fhrivers

IT needs more homosexuals...

Slayer_
Slayer_

The IT industry sucks, if your not being outsourced, your being overworked and underpaid. Your pension sucks, you don't get a union, and you constantly have to keep training. The women are the smart ones to avoid this industry.

sokkarie
sokkarie

I think the approach should be bottom up instead of top down. if we take a look at the ratio of female workers to the total population of IT workers, the current ratio of female students studying computer science in all universities is around 1 in 6. That is a very low ratio. So if today we have 1 female CIO out of 6 CIOs, that is the right level. If we want to increase the number of female CIO, we should start with students entering Computer Science majors and leadership positions will take care of themselves. Ayman Sokkarie

digibecky
digibecky

How convenient that he highlights the "conversational" skills of women and relates that to "Account Management" work. It seems a bit insular to highlight a single area where "woman help" is needed in IT. Doesn't it take a certain finesse and great skill set to successfully handle IT Project Management? What about technical skill application? Please.

recentlyreleased
recentlyreleased

I am associated with a company that has recently had a high degree of management turnover. This hit the IT department hard in the past year. The IT department leadership was composed of three males and three females - quite well balanced in my mind. The top role IT role was male and had been with the company for his entire career. This individual, fully deserving of a VP postion, became frustrated when this didn't occur, left the company to become a CIO, and was replaced by a female VP of IT - far less qualified (not just an opinion). The new leader subsequently fired the top two males left in IT leadership, leaving the entire IT leadership team to be females. All three males were highly qualified in their specific areas of influence, with good performance histories. No different than their female counterparts. The Senior VP of HR is female - as the vast majority of HR is - the opposite problem as seen in IT - and three of the past four executives hired have been female. I have nothing against females as leaders, or females in general - some of the best leaders, managers and peers I have had in my career have been female. Their sex had nothing to do with how they were viewed through my eyes. They were qualified individuals and we were fortunate having many talented females in IT leadership. As females they definitely brought a different perspectives to many aspects of the job. Not generallizing, just fact. Rising females in IT and business at all levels is a good thing for America and business in general. However, quota based hiring is not a good thing, and this case certainly could indicate a strong bias toward quotas based hiring practices. Women are no longer a minority in the business world. Candidates should be judged on their merits not their sex, at all levels.

Dr_Zinj
Dr_Zinj

The point is, I.T. is not a profession that interests a whole lot of women. The discrimination is NOT by the company, or the I.T. institution; it's women themselves, in general, being discriminatory against I.T. in their career choices. If board members didn't have the attention span of a 5 year old, they'd know this already.

Dyalect
Dyalect

Provided you know what you are doing and have experience. Who cares?

3298742984592813698
3298742984592813698

Good fix, transfer perople from HR to IT and IT to HR, balance fixed. I'll check back i a week to see how it worked out!

chris
chris

How about "You can lead a horse to water..."? Said boardrooms (and businesses in general) should get their heads out of their politically correct behinds and realize that diversity should be an asset - NOT an aspiration. I know both male and female IT people who are much more knowledgable than I, and a few of each that are not. jtdavies is exactly right - hire the best person for the job, and it shouldn't matter if that person is man, woman, or in-between.

sdan
sdan

Most people tend to hire people they feel comfortable with, i.e. that "team fit" dynamic. I.T. is predominately white men with a sprinkling of asian minorities thrown in. Hence the hiring dynamic encompasses the same, these are the type of people the incumbents feel they understand. However, when creating a "world-class" team or having to compete on the global playing field, almost without fail the more diverse the team the better performing. Time and again this has been demonstrated. Common sense would indicate that the less "like speak, like think, like do" when in boundary/technology pushing environments, the better the results as long as everyone works together toward a common goal. Anything less than that just doesn't cut it in the longterm. To hire people who "think differently" you have to recruit "differently" and you have to bring your "A" game managerially. That's a lot of work entailing successes and failures. Most hiring authorities will not take that risk even for the potential of outstanding results. The old phrase, "No one ever got fired for buying IBM" comes to mind.

Dknopp
Dknopp

So what. Why is there such a large need to try to cram women into career fields, a majority of them may not like? IT as a career field did not really kick in until the late 80's. Before that it was engineering students that did computer related work - almost all male students. In the 90's colleges were pushing the IT courses by talking about all the large amounts of money that you can make. So a lot of people who otherwise would not have gone into the career field ( male and female ), took the courses - pretty much just for the money, not because they like the work. Well those glory days are gone, the industry is chipping away at IT and it does not look like a money career field anymore - at least in the States. To be honest, with the instability and off-shoring that is going on in IT, I would not start a career in it in high school either.

Nicole Clay
Nicole Clay

I am a woman and have been in the IT Industry for roughly seven years. In that time I've seen MAYBE five or six other women that I could call a colleague. The fact is, most of us have been pre-programmed to believe that fields like Engineering and Information and Tech are "boy" careers, and often are represented as being no better than a car mechanic. Instead of creating quotas, generate interest. Change the mind of the culture from the ground up.

toni.abresch
toni.abresch

Yes there are fewer women in IT. I know because I am one of them. But it may not be gender discrimination. At least not at the end of the line. In my kid's high school, the IT related courses are filled with boys. Not just a few girls, NO girls. Science and Engineering is making inroads with programs like STEM to encourage more interest from girls. Perhaps we need to look at the education of our children and see if there might be underlying problems in garnerning interest from the female side of the population. My second comment is that I find it offensive to say that because IT is changing, it may now be better suited to women. Pull women in for the "soft" skills?!?!?! Please. Stop stereotyping men and women and look at the real issues.

landiscd
landiscd

I have experienced this imbalance first hand over my entire 17 years in the IT industry. Women tend to be invisible, and have to be twice as good as men just to get an "okay." Women are the ones who reach out to cross-functional groups, listen to what they are saying, and come back to the IT team and try to make real and lasting change. I rarely see men filling this role.

NickNielsen
NickNielsen

Can you do the job? If not, I don't care what you look like, I've got no use for you...at work.

jsargent
jsargent

Women don't choose not to go to war. If you ask any woman they will be just as willing to go to war as any man, so don't think that not going to war shows favoritism. 50% of women are not in industries because their mummies and daddies gave them the example that women should stay at home and kiss the butts of men. When they get into real life they end up working (in lower paid jobs), looking after the kids, cooking and with a lazy husband who returns home after work and does nothing because their mummies and daddies told them that that's the way things are. If anyone is a real man they don't let the women do more then 50% of the work at home. Discrimination is everywhere and it even exists in the family home. If a woman can't cook they feel guilty but if a man doesn't cook he's a maaaaaan. Once there is a balance then there will be no need for PC. Talking about equality in the work place means that it will disappear.Don't forget that PC'ism also protects the rights of everybody including your own. Being a man, have you ever complained of all the women taking your jobs...no I didn't think so, neither have I.

jsargent
jsargent

I thought that society had roughly 50% male vs 50% female. I wouldn't consider the female population any more of a minory than I could call the male population. But then again I guess you are one of those techies that just can't get on well with people finds it difficult to understand things outside your box.

jsargent
jsargent

Maybe they are sitting around thinking that they might not have the best the for job because half the applicants are missing.

jsargent
jsargent

I lot is being done in some countries. However, most doctors are male. What is the good reason for lop sidedness? Most gynacologists are male. My wife looks for a female gyno and she can't find one, What's the good reason for this imbalance?

net.minder
net.minder

I often hire practicum students and new grads from IT technical programs. Only twice have I had a female applicants who actually showed up for the interview. In May I offered one of those a job. She accepted verbally and sounded thrilled, but she changed her mind a week later. Oh well, I hope to do better next time. The real problem is, the Program Supervisors at two educational institutions have shown me their gender numbers. In one case, of a graduating class of 87 last year, only six were female. This is typical. Give me some numbers I can work with, and I will find some women I can hire.

jsargent
jsargent

In 1989 I went for an interview (I am a male) and they (a group of men) asked me "what would I think of having a woman supervisor?" I answered that "I didn't really see the need for anyone to ask that question as I wouldn't see that it would be an issue to any normal person". Did they need to ask that question? (Oh by they way they told me that I didn't get the job because they ran out of money in that department.)

jsargent
jsargent

Why is it just a percentage? Please explain. Plus: How do you get in the trucker's union?, The retail sector is the lowest paid section except for the cleaning sector. Women put more importance on fashion and buy more clothes, why can't men buy more clothes? No women geeks because mummies and daddies give them barbie. Yes it is an issue because society needs to tell girls that they can do the same things as the boys. There is nothing that a boy can do that a girl can't but schools and homes still don't teach them that.

Loggies
Loggies

"...he was interested in more than a professional relationship..." And your point is... ? Relationships are a 2-sided affair. Often only one party is interested. You can't blame a person for that. It all depends on how the person acts when you make it clear that you are not interested. If he said "oh sorry, I'll back off" that's the end of it. ( However, you'd have to accept that you will be treated like any other colleague in terms of his time allocation in stead of having priority. Its not discrimination...family/friends normally have priority in human relationships and time allocation. Business contacts are just business contacts. They have to queue...) "...problem of women falling as prey to their male counterparts ..." Same issue. You can't blame a man for finding a girl attractive, as long as he understands "not interested" means "not interested" and backs off. I've found that most men keep their distance when they know they are not welcome. "...Why ....their mentors are male?..." In which cave were you hiding ? The females are new intrants to an industry that was largely invented and developed by males. The guy already has the skills and is willing to share them. Do you want to go back to Univac and develop an all-female industry so that you can select your tutor according to gender ?

kmthom
kmthom

I'm just curious as to what area of IT you specialize in currently, and what you specialized in when you started your career 17 years ago. -=K=-

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