Windows investigate

Windows 8 Cheat Sheet

UPDATED: Windows 8 will be with us soon, here's what you need to know about the most radical redesign since Windows 95.

Windows 8, let me guess, that'll be the follow-up to Windows 7?

Yup, you got it in one.

OK, so basically same stuff, different number, am I right?

Not quite: Windows 8 differs quite radically from what comes before. Windows president Steven Sinofsky claims that Windows 8 represents a "generational change" for Windows, the likes of which has not seen since the release of Windows 95.

How so?

Well for a start it's designed to run on more than just a PC. Windows 8 is made to run on both laptop and desktop computer and tablet hardware, scaling its interface to different screen sizes.

But Windows 7 tablets didn't exactly take over the world...

True, Microsoft knows this and is aware that as tablets fly off the shelves it needs to have a viable operating system in the slate space. The problem with Windows 7 on tablets is that it was first and foremost a desktop OS, with tiny fiddly icons designed for a mouse pointer and not chubby fingers. That's why, with Windows 8, Microsoft has devised a tile-based interface, known as Modern UI,that is designed around touch.

So what's Modern UI got to offer?

The interface is based around interacting with tiles, basically large icons whose size makes them easy to touch. These tiles can be tapped or clicked to run local or web apps, or to go to websites. Tiles can be swapped in and out of blocks, for instance to build blocks of apps or sites that are most commonly used, or related to specific topics like work. Tiles also link to online services like the Windows Store, where users can buy new Modern UI apps, and system settings like Control Panel.

Certain tiles can be set up to display dynamic information. For instance an RSS reader tile can display the latest story in the feed or a calendar tile could show your next appointment. In this way real time information can streamed straight in to the Windows 8 Start screen.

Navigation of the Windows 8 Start screen is well-suited to touch, with users able to drag and pinch-and-zoom to manoeuvre through blocks of tiles and to rearrange tiles by dragging and dropping, or resizing them with their fingers. Edges of the screen also play an important role, swiping from the left or right border brings up bars – known as Charms - for quick interactions with the system or an app, and a touchscreen keyboard can also be summoned to enter text.

Navigating the apps themselves is again designed to work well with touch, with easy-to-hit icons and tiles, and single gesture swipes to perform tasks such as flicking through running apps or shutting down an app.

Windows 8 Start screen

What if I just want to use it on a bog standard laptop?

Then you can use mouse and keyboard to navigate the Modern UI. Some users of the early builds of Windows 8 complained that Modern UI is not intuitive without a touchscreen, but Microsoft has sought to address this with a host of mouse and keyboard shortcuts. For example mousing to the corners of the screen allows for fast navigation, and apps, files or settings can be called by typing a name, or just the first letters of the name, into the Windows 8 Start screen. Also all of the hotkeys from Windows 7 work in the Modern UI 8 interface. Microsoft's goal with Windows 8 is, after all, for it to be as easy to use on a tablet as on a PC.

What happened to the old Windows desktop?

It's still there but as a Windows 8 app, as by default Windows 8 users log into the Modern UI tile-based Start screen. The Desktop app is a full-screen Windows 7-style desktop, with the usual Recycle Bin, Internet Explorer, Windows Explorer, and taskbar. On a traditional Intel or AMD-based PC hardware the desktop will run legacy apps, such as those that run on a Windows 7 machine. However ARM-based hardware, such as most tablets, will not be able to run third party Windows desktop apps in Windows 8, only Microsoft desktop apps such as Notepad and Calculator.

The desktop can even be used with touch. Those who recall trying to hit tiny icons on a tablet running Windows 7 will be pleased to learn that Microsoft has implemented what it calls "fuzzy hit targeting", which works out which button or icon it's most likely you wanted to trigger. Reports are that it's not perfect but is an improvement over Windows 7.

Does the cloud get a look in?

Of course, online integration is woven throughout Windows 8. On the social side the People app allows contacts from multiple sources and social networks - such as Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn - to be mashed together into a single stream, with live updates from individuals or groups displaying on tiles.

There's also some serious syncing. Sign into Windows 8 using a Microsoft account and it will sync your settings between every Windows 8 machine you use. This will let you share your address book, account details for services like Facebook and Twitter, email and instant messages and the like between different devices. On top of this there's the ability for users to sync apps they've bought from the Windows Store or files stored on Microsoft's SkyDrive service between devices.

Perhaps the most impressive feature of Windows 8 is how it integrates online information with what's stored on your machine.Modern UI's simple search will not only scour file, apps and settings on the device, as well as online info, but also look within apps that have been enabled to take advantage of the search feature, for example looking for a track in a music app or a contact in a social network.

What else is cool?

There's the fast boot time, Microsoft demoed Windows 8 booting in eight seconds on an ultrabook at the Mobile World Congress (MWC) earlier this year. There's also an easy reinstall option that allows a clean install of Windows without the need to delete any personal data stored on the device.

And for sheer wow factor there's its ability to work with some gigantic screens. At MWC Microsoft demoed Windows 8 running on an 82-inch display with multiple people using it. Microsoft said that up to 10 people using all their fingers could interact with the display at the same time.

What's Windows 8 got to offer business?

Windows 8 – particularly Windows 8 Pro - contains a range of features relevant to enterprise - helping to mange consumerisation, encryption, remote updates and virtualisation.

For a start, having a single OS that can be used on a desktop or laptop PC and a tablet may appeal to enterprises looking to provide and manage a single computing environment for staff inside and outside of the office.

Many features aimed at business are designed to make it easier to work outside the office. DirectAccess allows remote users to access the corporate system without having to sign in to a separate VPN connection. Meanwhile Windows To Go allows Windows 8 to boot from an external flash drive - allowing staff to access their corporate OS from a personal device without having to copy corporate data onto its hard drive. The flash drive can also be encrypted with BitLocker to provide additional security. Managing the costs of remote workers will also be aided by built-in mobile broadband metering and native support for 3G and 4G.

Businesses will be able to develop their own Modern UI-style enterprise apps, which can then be centrally managed, updated and distributed by managers. Apps and any data they contain will be able to be kept within the corporate firewall. The ability of Live Tiles to display dynamic information allows for the creation of corporate apps that act as dashboards, for example displaying real-time feeds from enterprise systems.

Another feature that promises to make IT managers life easier is the integration of Microsoft's HyperV client, its virtual machine manager, into the OS. The integrated HyperV feature, a Windows Server 2008 and 2012 compatible tool, should allow IT managers to run multiple configurations of virtual machines from a single device.

What versions are available?

When Windows 8 is released on 26 October it will come in three versions: two for Intel-based PCs, Windows 8 and Windows 8 Pro, and Windows 8 RT for ARM-based tablets like the Microsoft Surface.

Windows 8 is aimed at consumers, Windows 8 Pro is for tech enthusiasts and business/technical professionals – adding features, mentioned above, related to encryption, virtualisation, PC management and domain connectivity.

Computers that shipped with Windows XP, Vista or 7 can be upgraded to Windows 8 Pro for $39.99. The offer is available until 31 January 2013, after which the price will rise. The price of upgrading to Windows 8 Pro falls further if you bought or buy a PC with Windows 7 between 2 June 2012 and 31 January 2013, dropping to $14.99.

The upgrade to Windows 8 Pro will be available as a download, with Windows Media Centre available as a free add-on. It is also possible to upgrade by buying a physical disc, although that option will cost $69.99, again a limited offer until 31 January 2013.

If you're planning to build your own PC and install Windows 8 on it then OEM prices ahead of launch are $99.99 for Windows 8 and $139.99 for Windows 8 Pro.

The OS will be available in 109 languages across 231 markets worldwide.

How easy is it to upgrade?

It varies, depending on what Microsoft OS you're running now. Upgrading from Windows 7 to Windows 8 keeps the programs, Windows settings and files; from Vista keeps the settings and files. Upgrading from Windows XP only keeps personal files. A Windows 8 upgrade assistant wizard guides users through the process.

While Microsoft says that upgrading from the preview versions of Windows 8 to the full version will require a clean install, there are workarounds involving modifying .ini files.

What apps does it come with?

Bundled Modern UI apps include those drawing on online content through Bing: such as Sport, Weather, Finance, Music, Video and games from Xbox; organisation apps: Mail, Calendar, Photos, Messaging, People and SkyDrive; as well as a variety of extras.

Does it include Microsoft Office?

Touch optimised versions of Microsoft Word, Excel, PowerPoint, OneNote will be bundled with Windows RT but not with other Windows 8 SKUs, although these will be able to run legacy Office apps through the Windows Desktop.

Office 2013 has been redesigned to incorporate the same tiled interface as Windows 8, while retaining the ability to be used with a mouse and keyboard, and the code rewritten to work on ARM processors, as well as 32 and 64 bit Intel and AMD chips.

When will machines ship with Windows 8?

New Windows 8 PCs and Windows RT tablets will be available to buy from October. Launching at the same time as Windows 8 will be the RT version of Surface, a Windows 8 tablet designed by Microsoft that features a keyboard built into the cover. A version of Surface running Windows 8 Pro on an Intel Core processor will be released 90 days later.

Windows 8 touchscreen keyboard

So what are Windows 8's chances? It sounds like it's got a fighting chance

While analysts predict that Windows 8 will be a popular OS, there is expectation among many that demand will take a while to pick up. One of the key selling points for Windows 8 predicted by a Morgan Stanley analyst would be the ability to use popular Office programs like Word on a tablet.

However enterprise adoption could be slowed by the fact that most businesses are still deploying Windows 7. US companies told analyst house Gartner that Windows 7 would be running on about half of PCs by the end of last year. Given that many companies have either just upgraded or are in the process of upgrading to Windows 7 it seems unlikely that they will in any hurry to upgrade to Windows 8. If they put off their next OS upgrade for another four years, which is how long it typically takes for businesses to refresh their desktop OS, then businesses are likely to skip Windows 8 altogether, in favour of some future flavour of OS. As a result Gartner research director Annette Jump has predicted that the number of businesses deploying Windows 8 "will definitely be lower" than that of Windows 7.

CIOs were also sceptical about the business value of Windows 8 over Windows 7, when questioned by TechRepublic earlier this year.

What about the Modern UI, that looks pretty whizz bang

It does, but despite the praise that has been lavished onto the Modern UI in some quarters there are a few caveats. While the UI is credited with making Windows 8 a breeze to use once the users knows what they're doing, learning how to use Modern UI may put some people off. People who've used preview builds have mentioned that new users of Windows 8 need schooling on how to use features like touching the edges of the screen to bring up interactive bars. It may sound harsh but not having an immediately accessible UI could cost Microsoft users when it is competing against the iPad and its highly intuitive iOS and the increasingly refined Android interface. There is also the risk that Windows 8's attempts to support apps that work equally well across different devices and form factors will end up producing apps that don't fully exploit the capabilities of any device.

Microsoft is certainly confident that people will like Windows 8 however, making a free consumer preview of the OS available to use until the final product is released.

Will its app store help its chances?

It is in the app space where Microsoft could face its biggest battle with Windows 8. By the time the OS launches it will be competing against an Android and iOS app base that has been built up over several years. It's going to take something really special to make iPad or Android users give up the apps they know how to use and switch to a new platform.

By mid-October 2012 the Windows Store offered more than 5,550 apps globally, more than 4,850 of which were free. With more than 250,00 apps on the iPad App Store, Microsoft has some catching up to do.

Microsoft is trying to entice developers to produce apps for the Windows Store by offering an attractive revenue slice from sales. As an incentive to get users downloading Modern UI apps Microsoft made all apps on the store will be free until the end of the consumer preview period.

What will I need to run Windows 8?

Windows 8 will run on just about any recent 32 or 64-bit desktop or laptop, as well as running on modern ARM-based tablet computers. Microsoft recommends a 1GHz processor, 1GB of RAM (or 2GB for 64-bit), 20GB of hard disc space, and a DirectX 9 graphics card with WDDM 1.0 support.

One other important requirement is that Modern UI apps need a minimum of 1024x768 screen resolution and a 1366x768 to use the snap feature that allows apps to be run side by side.

Microsoft says that Windows 8 will support four common "system-on-a-chip" sets - the Nvidia Tegra 3, the Qualcomm Snapdragon, the Texas Instruments OMAP, and the Intel Atom Z2760 .

About

Nick Heath is chief reporter for TechRepublic UK. He writes about the technology that IT-decision makers need to know about, and the latest happenings in the European tech scene.

74 comments
Eric Hall
Eric Hall

The most atrocious downgrade to an OS that could be fathomed. Shame on Microsoft

LanceJZ
LanceJZ

"One other important requirement is that Modern UI apps need a minimum of 1024x768 screen resolution and a 1366x768 to use the snap feature that allows apps to be run side by side." This is not accurate. My laptop has a resolution of 1280x720 and everything works great, but the snap screen. I also have allot of free Windows 8 apps installed, and they all work great as well. You may want to make a correction on that. I have some other tips no one talks about, using the toolbars for Windows 8 Desktop task bar, turn on the Desktop and LInks toolbars, they are really handy. I am so in love with Windows 8, and for $40 it is more then worth it. It made my five year old Acer laptop like new again. It is nice and spunky. Thank you for your time.

hillelana
hillelana

W8 found the network printer and installed drivers for it on the first boot without me even asking it to. Very pleasant surprise!

Alienwilly
Alienwilly

Problem solved. If you won't read to solve an issue, you will always be looking for problems instead of answers. I always buy a new version of windows to learn even though I don't need it for myself. I load it on the worst equipment available at the time to see what it will work on. If I am happy with it then they will probably be happy with it when they want to load it on their old equipment. I have customers that have questions that lead to business when I explain it to them for free. They then bring their questions and equipment to me when it's broken or for assistance which means $$$. Can you say Ca Ching? Total up front cost of education for me is less than $200 including the O.S.

chris_thamm
chris_thamm

You conveniently forgot to mention that Microsoft HAS FORCIBLY REMOVED THE START MENU. This means that anyone who has learned ANY VERSION of Windows since 95, will not know how to use Windows 8. You also forgot to mention that the learning curve is insanely steep, and that most people will not be able to find what they are looking for, to the point of frustration. NOT A SINGLE PERSON to whom I have shown Windows 8 Release Preview -- and I have shown it to literally dozens of people, ranging from end users to IT Pros -- will be "upgrading" any time soon. EVERY SINGLE ONE OF THEM asked where the Start Menu was, and the overwhelming majority were not willing to give it even a second look once I told them the Start Menu was gone for good. Of the few who were willing to spend some time with it, most found it too frustrating to develop any liking or desire for it. The bottom line is, for people whose computers do what they bought them to do, Windows 8 does not fill any need. Microsoft clearly did not take into account that the majority of people are not the least bit interested in having to learn how to use a computer all over again.

FelipeKat
FelipeKat

Cloud synchronization may cause heartburn for some corporations. Apple's iCloud creates problems regarding data ownership and confidentiality and Apple does not seem very interested in addressing corporate concerns. It will be interesting to see Microsoft's approach.

Daddy Tadpole
Daddy Tadpole

... and not just to tweet & find what's for lunch. I have various expensive scientific and technical applications that I can't afford to renew evrey 10 years, let alone every 4.

techrepublic
techrepublic

I think that "Windows classic" should be the default OS on the desktop, with Metro being used to run a Meto App when (or if) the User starts it. Business environments would prefer that. But what does Microsoft care about what their customers want? I think Win8 will be another Vista on the desktop. It will be ignored until its successor comes on the scene, and by then maybe Microsoft will provide us with something designed for the desktop - not a phone.

eye4bear
eye4bear

I have run the Customer Preview in dual boot on my home PC since it came out and dislike the way the "start screen" works ( install a group of programs ie office and you get tiles for EASH program, not a tile for the group like in good old start menu. So after installed a few larger progam groups I have a HUGE bunch of (way too small ) icons in a huge number of blocks all over my start page.

Roc Riz
Roc Riz

with very little bang. Made more for tablet or a touch device than a desktop, and therefore not really for traditional business applications.

kevsan
kevsan

From what I see Metro looks more like a 5 year old's story book. Even the 1st graphical DOS looked better.

masukuma
masukuma

if they can make a OS for servers and another for desktops- why not tablets? everyone agrees that Window 8 will make a great OS for tablets - no questions. but the insistence that they have to force metro down the throats of business users - that's not acceptable!

swjslj
swjslj

I found Windows 7 disappointing mostly because it took more clicks to do most tasks. I use my computers for work and if it takes longer for more me to accomplish things I'm not happy. For me, it's all about efficiency; XP was very efficient. Microsoft OS's have not been getting better. Here's hoping...

cdreis
cdreis

Great for a phone, tablet, or kitchen pc... it's a non-starter for doing serious work with many apps

WATKINS12
WATKINS12

It would be nice if the sales outlets would be more specific about what components are in the PCs so we can determine if they are Win 8 compatible. I could do this with my current PC because of the sysinfo app. But, when all they give you is, for example, Intel graphics, that is no help at all. While most of the PCs being offered are probably non-compatible in some way, I am not going incur huge shipping costs and restocking fees to go on a fishing trip.

eric.smith
eric.smith

I have been using the Windows 8 CP for just over a week now. I have it running on a new core I7 laptop, a core I7 Desktop as well as an 8 year old P4 Desktop PC. All three are running flawlessly. Metro is running smoothly, however, it does take a bit of getting use to. I find it easier to navigate Metro by realizing that Metro is actually the Start Menu. The Windows 8 desktop does not have an actual Start Menu button as in previous versions of Windows, but rather Metro is the Start Menu. Once you realize this It is much easier to know where you are in Metro. The only issue I had when installing Windows 8 CP is that I failed to use my Windows Live ID associated email address when installing and was unable to login after an initial reboot. As the Administrator account is locked out by default I had to use Hiren's to unlock the Administrator account and then log in as the Local Administrator, Create a new account using my Windows Live ID and then everything was fine. Microsoft needs to HIGHLIGHT that part just a LITTLE better in the Retail Release.

PeterM42
PeterM42

.....with 1Gb RAM and the performance is fine. The Metro interface is a bit odd, but obviously needs getting used to, Underneath the Metro front-end, it is much the same as the other versions of NT 6 - Vista (NT v6.0) and "Windows7" (NT v6.1), but as it is actually NT v6.2 that is hardly surprising. Windows Explorer has adopted the Ribbon interface, so that takes a bit of getting used to as well. Most things are good old solid NT. I can see the point of Metro for touch tablets and smartphones, but DEFINITELY NOT for normal desktops - waste of screen space. Some of the Metro stuff should be hidden a bit deeper under "Control Panel" type functions, but then I guess there is a desparation by MS to find something to put up front as "Apps".

rciadan
rciadan

Business is the the only one who has just barely switched to Win7; the average consumer just began going to 7 as their old equipment craps out or gets viruses that cost too much to fix. A lot of consumers are complaining that they just got 7 and now they are afraid 8 will be foisted upon them much like Vista was, and at what expense? How much will the new OS cost, and will they now have to get another new computer just to make it work, especially with touch technology, which is a big part of the sales pitch. And how about having to put your data on the cloud to get synced: alot of people still don't trust the "cloud". I am one...

rcl4rk
rcl4rk

So far, so good. I also tested the beta versions of Vista and Windows 7 and this is by far the smoothest and easiest transition. I had a smooth, glitch-free download and I really like the added security of "Bitlocker" which I didn't have in Windows 7. So far the only driver issue I had was with my HP printer, which was easily resolved by installing the driver manually with the "advanced printer setup" under "Devices and Printers." Thanks for the "Cheat Sheet!" ~ @rcl4rk

TNT
TNT

The author says there is no explanation for this magic, but actually this is not a new feature. Win 7 has this ability now as long as you are running Server 2008 on your servers. I imagine this will be the same under Win 8. If you want an explanation for how this works check the Server 2008 documentation. This feature has not been widely publicized and is something that I think is a boon. You can teach users to use a pre-configured VPN, but its often slow and Win 7/8 witn Server 2008 makes the process itself unnecessary. I wish more businesses would get on board with this tech. Other than this one area, the reviewer nailed everything down well. In fact, this is the best overview of the OS I've read to date!

bcjinsantafe
bcjinsantafe

I noticed the comment by Nick Heath that only microsoft apps would work with the new os. That sound rather early applish. They were so propriatory at that time that people didnt use apple in droves because they couldnt use anything but apple hardware and software. Now they are going to remove a lot of software from our use, again. The other thought/comment is that i went and downloaded the 'beta' then saw the 'notice' that if you installed the beta, then chose to return to your origional os, that you would have to do a reinstall of the origional. There was no comment about running it as a second os you could choose. Be sure you want to install the beta only to find you have to reinstall your previous os and possibly all your associated programs

Gromanon
Gromanon

I have found Win + X to be a great new shortcut for managing.

stiingya
stiingya

seems like a lot of people are griping that there is no start menu, etc. BUT Metro is one big start menu with constantly updating and useable information. Plus it's actually faster to get to clicking the windows key to swap between the desktop UI and the metro UI instead of mousing clicking in the start menu. Right now you probably have multiple windows open on multiple monitors while you work so that you can access information from several sources at once. But some of those windows could be replaced with information updating in a metro app most of the time. I could see running a "strip" of metro at all times on my desktop while working in applications within the desktop UI. NICE!

andrew232006
andrew232006

Why not just make two different UIs for two different hardware interface technologies?

jruby
jruby

I RDP into a LOT of servers and workstations, as well as tap into them using VM consoles - there is no 'hard' edge of the screen for the mouse to stop on to get the menu to pop up. So when I'm accessing a remote computer or a VM, I have to slow down and make sure the mouse pauses in the interface response area. Without a good visual clue (like the start button!), it's sometimes a pain to figure out where to stop the mouse to get the interactive bar to pop up without rolling out of the console and missing it entirely.

dave.mitchell
dave.mitchell

Any ideas what the licensing model will be? One low cost fee for all your devices! I wonder.

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

I doubt anyone will be correcting a nine-month-old article. Most of it refers to what was known when the second beta was released, months before the final RTM version.

Madcap_Magician
Madcap_Magician

Because, thanks to a licensing agreement, I'm running Windows 8 Enterprise on an ASUS EP121 Slate to manage our network of 300+ machines, using all our x64 software that I used in Windows 7. The sky is not falling, the start menu did not disappear. It's been redesigned, sure - but you are showing an ignorance by saying it disappeared. What did disappear is the ability to nest files and folders using Start. Aside from that, Windows 8 is an improvement over Windows 7 in most every regard. Why would one be forced to "learn how to use a computer all over again"? Perhaps you're just not providing any logic for your assertion, but the changes made (Start, Charms) have convenient keyboard shortcuts, and if you don't like that how about you link it to hovering the mouse in the bottom left (you know, where the infamous Start button lived) or in the bottom right (you know, where the system notification stuff lives). What do your users use the legacy Start menu for - search and run? Pinned applications? Instead of perpetuating the negative hype, why not explain to your colleagues that the redesigned Start screen allows for a more robust search and run; explain that they are still freely able to pin apps to both their taskbar (which, by the way, got a much needed update and overhaul for the expanding multi-monitor demands placed on modern workstations) or to the redesigned Start screen. If you work to educate, you'll find that Windows 8 is actually really a cinch to navigate, and allows more methods of input than its predecessor. All you have to do is what I had to do when Windows 95 released - click one button, or press one hotkey, and voila - Start. Maybe I'm in the minority, but I don't see a steep learning curve. I see an OS with a shiny new coat of paint, and a supercharged motor under the hood. It still runs, and it still needs TLC. But it's more responsive, and it's more personalized.

LanceJZ
LanceJZ

Alright, so what exactly is your point?

mark.cooper
mark.cooper

As far as I know, most software vendors offer free upgrades to a certain point. If they make it prohibitively expensive to upgrade their software to get to the latest OS, that's a vendor issue, not a Microsoft issue. In early 2011 I set up a network for a local Ohio county public transit agency. In early 2011, this national transit software vendor would only support XP Pro workstations, Windows Server 2003, and SQL Server 2005. This is in February 2011!!! You can't blame Microsoft for this kind of crap. How long does it take to upgrade a software package? We had to install VirtualBox (free) and run virtual XP machines to run the transit software. I'm sure VirtualBox for W8 is in the near future. You will still be able to use current desktops to run your "various expensive scientific and technical applications."

LanceJZ
LanceJZ

Windows is the default OS, the was known as Metro UI are just added APIs (DLLs and such). It is not a different OS.

LanceJZ
LanceJZ

It is so supper easy to right click the apps you don't want on your Start Screen then select remove all at once, or group them into named groups using the dash in the lower right. Much easier then organizing the Star Menu of Windows before.

mark.cooper
mark.cooper

Only pin to the Start screen the programs you use the most. Typing at the keyboard will easily give you the un-pinned programs.

LanceJZ
LanceJZ

I'm very happy with Windows 8, it gives my laptop better performance, that means I can do my work even faster, anywhere. I use apps such as Photoshop, 3DS Max, and Visual Studio. I make video games.

techrepublic
techrepublic

Yes, but it takes at least a little inteligence to use Win7 and previous versions of the OS. Microsoft wants something that an idiot can use - so they are treating all of us like idiots. What is the MS marketing dept. going to do if Win8 becomes known as the "Windows for idiots"? Someone should create a website at www.WindowsForIdiots.com. I'm sure they would get alot of hits.

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

Marketers of all kinds have convinced consumers of the 'need' to keep up with the latest and greatest. If consumers have just installed W7, there's no one mandating they install W8. As long as their computers and operating systems run the applications they want, there's no need to upgrade or replace either one. If you don't trust the cloud, don't use it. I don't, for the same reason. There are advantages (less need to backup files locally, universal accessibility), but for me they don't outweigh the security concerns.

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

I don't think W8 is restricted to running Microsoft apps only. I know there will be online store similar to Apple's or Linux repositories, but I don't think it will be restricted to MS products or that you will be limited to the apps it carries. I've loaded a couple of third-party apps on my W8 test system already.

mark.cooper
mark.cooper

I know there are a bunch of hints and tricks for W8 out there. I've not yet taken the time to read them. Win+X is great.

Prescott_666
Prescott_666

I have Windows 8 CP 32-bit installed on a Dell GX260 with a P4, and Win + 8 works on it, but I also have Windows 8 RP 64-bit installed on a Dell GX620 with a Pentium D, and Win + 8 does not work on that system. Has anyone else tried Win + X on Windows 8 RP? My installation of Windows 8 RP could be broken, but Microsoft is busy ripping all the good stuff out, and Win + X may not work anymore in RP.

Prescott_666
Prescott_666

How many legs does a dog have if you call the tail a leg? Four. Calling a tail a leg doesn't make it a leg. Abraham Lincoln Calling Metro UI a Start Menu doesn't make it a Start Menu, and Windows 8 does not have a Start Menu.

Gisabun
Gisabun

A registry tweak [Googlre it] allows you to switch to the Windows 7 interface if you don't like Metro.

Cynyster
Cynyster

You know what it is like. You RDP into a box open up IE and the start page was left on MSN and all the rapidly updating ads and stories drags everything to a complete stand still until you can get off that page. I can just imagine what a simple scroll to the side in the metro gui is going to do to the bandwidth.

Gisabun
Gisabun

Don't expect much of a change. I didn't see "Ultimate". So far just Enterprise, Business [formerly "Pro" I guess] and Home. "Starter" usually isn't listed as it's for OEMs. I think ARM edition(s) are OEM. So no pricing there.

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

"Why would one be forced to "learn how to use a computer all over again"? Perhaps you're just not providing any logic for your assertion, but the changes made (Start, Charms) have convenient keyboard shortcuts, and if you don't like that how about you link it to hovering the mouse ..." Maybe you innately knew those new keyboard shortcuts without anyone telling you. Maybe you innately knew to hover the cursor over apparently empty portions of the screen without having to be told. For the rest of us, that's called learning, and it doesn't happen without being taught. The 'hot spot' behavior is especially new, since nothing like it has been in previous version of Windows. How would experienced Windows users know to position their cursors over areas where there are no buttons, links or markings to distinguish those portions of the screen from the rest of the desktop? It's not my job to 'sell' W8 to my users. It's my job to make theirs as easy as possible. Right now, since we have no reason to install W8, making their jobs easy means we'll be remaining on W7. My desktop and laptop users have mice and keyboards only; they don't care about new methods of input that they won't have access to anyway.

LanceJZ
LanceJZ

VMWare 9 says it works with Windows 8.

SKDTech
SKDTech

Only the WinRT version wil be locked down to Metro-only apps. x86/x64 versions will still allow you to load third party apps from non-Windows Store sources

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

I've read in multiple places that the registry tweak from Developer was disabled in Consumer beta.

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

But somehow I missed it on my first TWO installs several weeks ago. Those were both Enterprise versions. I didn't see it until I loaded Pro last week. Maybe it's not in E, or maybe it times out?

HAL 9000
HAL 9000

Is that those of us who do OPK Installs or wherever Microsoft call them now don't get to see that. We are supposed to know but until the customers want 8 why should I stop supporting the ones using older versions of Windows? Even 30 minutes a day taken to learn 8 means that for 30 minutes a day current users are not getting supported. Unlike some people I can not sit around all day doing nothing and expecting others to pay me for it. Some of us actually have to work for a living you know. ;) Also if you like 8 so much you are going to love Ubuntu 12 whatever the newest version currently is with Crossover installed it's much faster than 8 is on the same hardware. :^0 Col

LanceJZ
LanceJZ

Because when you install Windows 8, it gives you a short tutorial about the mouse hot spots. Have you ever installed Windows 8? If so how did you miss that?