Microsoft

Name that Windows version

If you've been in IT for any time at all, it seems like many of the arguments for and against Windows Vista have all been heard before. Here's an article from TechRepublic's big brother site CBSNews.com. See if you can came the version of Windows that's being discussed.

If you've been in IT for any time at all, it seems like many of the arguments for and against Windows Vista have all been heard before. Here's an article from TechRepublic's big brother site CBSNews.com. See if you can name the version of Windows that's being discussed.

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Windows Vista is everyone's favorite whipping boy lately. Most recently, TechRepublic's Jason Hiner piled on by declaring Vista dead and mentioning the reasons why Vista failed. Even so, as everyone in IT who's been around for a while knows, every new version -- including the celebrated and now legendary introduction of Windows 95 -- is greeted with the same trepidations and warnings of "Ooooh, should we upgrade or not?"

To prove the point, I dug around archives of TechRepublic's big brother CBSNews.com and found an article about another version of Windows. This is the typical reporting done by the press when a new version of Windows comes out.

Read the article and see if you can identify the version of Windows that's being discussed. Beyond the version information, I've omitted some obvious historical references in the original article just to make it a little harder. I've also condensed the article for space.

Windows XXXXXX: To Buy Or Not To Buy?

With one week to go before Microsoft's Windows XXXXXX hits retail stores, inquiring computer users want to know: Should they shell out the $XX or so for new software to upgrade their machines? The new software, to be launched XXXXXX, isn't the huge advance that Windows XXXXXX was. Microsoft Corp., acknowledging the less dramatic impact of the upgrade, hasn't duplicated the huge advertising campaign of XX years ago. Computer game players may want the system's improved 3-D technology. And those who spend a lot of time nosing around the Internet might like  Microsoft's Web browser. But most computer users will find far fewer enhancements than the Windows XXXXXX upgrade offered, and nearly all new applications will work with either Windows XXXXXX or XXXXXX. "In my opinion, what little we will get above and beyond (what) we already have ... is not worth $XXX," said Rajendra Gondhalekar, a civil engineer in Birmingham, Ala. Windows XXXXXX is expected to sell for about $XX less than its $XXX list price. Microsoft readily acknowledges that Windows XXXXXX is more of a tuneup than an overhaul. But the company says it offers a variety of solid improvements that most consumers would find useful and allow them to run programs easier, faster and more reliably.

Computing publications and industry analysts, meanwhile, say the decision to upgrade should be based on how consumers use their PCs and what new tasks they might want them to perform.

"For the pedestrian home users, who are happy with what they're doing and don't plan major changes, I don't understand why any of (them) should be motivated to run out and get this," said Harry Fenik, an analyst with Zona Research in Redwood City, Calif., who has tested Windows XXXXXX for several weeks and likes it. "Alternatively, people who tend to buy the latest and greatest and add new peripherals on a regular basis are probably going to find their world less crazy than they did before," he said. Anyone who's bought a PC with Windows XXXXXX in the last year already has many of the new program's upgrades. Anyone with a PC more than a couple of years old may simply want to take advantage of low prices and buy a new machine, which will come with Windows XXXXXX. ..., Windows XXXXXX starts up and shuts down more quickly than Windows XXXXXX and is less prone to crash. It also boasts a more efficient file-storing system. Richard Pulcrano, owner of a mobile radiology service in Huntington, W. Va., continuously gets on and off the Web and believes Windows XXXXXX will let him work more efficiently. Pulcrano put his order in for Windows XXXXXX several months ago. "It's such a cheap way to get things done," he said. "Time is money, and $XXX is nothing compared with how much time it saves me."

Name that Windows version

Ok... so you've read the article.  Now - Name That Windows Version!

Do you think you got it right?

Get the answer.

19 comments
LarryD4
LarryD4

Woo Hoo I got it! Man that had Wndows 98 written all over it.

Derek Schauland
Derek Schauland

It is somewhat funny that the same kind of questions were asked about Windows 98 as are asked about Vista. Ironic how similar yet different they are... no matter that there are nearly 10 years between them.

Jacky Howe
Jacky Howe

At least you didn't have to invest in new hardware to be able run it properly.

Ben Iron Damper
Ben Iron Damper

I chose 98 but I noticed in the options list you left of Windows ME.

The Scummy One
The Scummy One

Ok, and was it worth it?? The original release of this was cr@p, it was re-released and there was no Upgrade from the previous version, screwing over anyone that bought it first, cause they had to re-purchase a second edition license.

John Sheesley - TechRepublic Pro
John Sheesley - TechRepublic Pro

If you've been in IT for any time at all, it seems like many of the arguments for and against Windows Vista have all been heard before. I dug around TechRepublic's big brother site CBSNews.com and found an article about a version of Windows. I redacted the version information and some other historical references and posted it on Classics Rock: http://blogs.techrepublic.com.com/classic-tech/?p=187 See if you can came the version of Windows that's being discussed. You'll see that articles such as this rehash the same arguments for and against new versions year after year. Can you name the correct version of Windows?

Locrian_Lyric
Locrian_Lyric

MS tends to get it right every other version or so.

Bramazoid
Bramazoid

There was a free Win98SE upgrade CD you could order from MS to upgrade the original 98 to SE. I have three of 'em.

Wally Bahny
Wally Bahny

I like this idea, John. It would be a fun article once every week or two just to lighten the load. By the way, I got it right.

Jacky Howe
Jacky Howe

and I thought that it was deliberate so it had to be pre ME. ME was an interesting OS to work with. It either worked or it didn't. No if's or buts.

Ben Iron Damper
Ben Iron Damper

Yes indeed it was a HORRIBLE version. Dare a I say the worst of the MS OS releases.

John Sheesley - TechRepublic Pro
John Sheesley - TechRepublic Pro

I thought it might be fun. I probably will try it again from time to time. I might have made this one a little too easy though. So far most people have got it right!

Jacky Howe
Jacky Howe

that I did the poll before it was updated, I would have picked ME if it had of been there. ;)

The Scummy One
The Scummy One

I went to see how many people voted which way, and saw Me there all of a sudden??? It took a moment, but I realized you must have updated it :D Edit: And having Me on there may skew the right vs. wrong answers a bit more to the wrong :D

Derek Schauland
Derek Schauland

Looking at the bottom for editorial whoopses would be cheating... and winners never cheat or something like that

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