iPad compare

G-Form Extreme Sleeve protects iPad from dropped bowling ball

G-From Extreme Sleeve lets you drop a bowling ball on you iPad and not crack it open.

Photo credit: G-Form

I always crack open gadgets in a way that lets me put them back together again. You wouldn't think dropping a bowling ball on an iPad would also leave the device in working order. But it can, if your tablet is protected with a G-Form Extreme Sleeve.

At CES 2012, the guys from CNET's The 404 tested the G-Form Extreme Sleeve by dropping a bowling ball on a working iPad 2.

About

Bill Detwiler is Managing Editor of TechRepublic and Tech Pro Research and the host of Cracking Open, CNET and TechRepublic's popular online show. Prior to joining TechRepublic in 2000, Bill was an IT manager, database administrator, and desktop supp...

17 comments
mhoff1387
mhoff1387

how well does it protect against things such as spills, drops (on the flat surface and the corners), animal attacks (my friend had a case that was made of similar material as one of her dog's toys. She woke up to find the case ripped in two and her iPad in a different room), or sharp/pointy objects?

Slayer_
Slayer_

It makes a big difference.

mandrake64
mandrake64

But wouldn't dropping a bowling ball on an iPad without the sleeve waste the exposure to toxins suffered by south east Asia factory workers during the iPad's assembly. Better to live with the sleeve and make the iPad last as long as possible or simply go bowling for bowling's sake and socialize face to face, rather than feeling the need to stay connected all the time via the Internet.

jonrosen
jonrosen

Are they making them for anything other than iPads? I'd rather drop the bowling ball on the iPad without the sleeve, but that's just me ;)

Bill Detwiler
Bill Detwiler

Yes. G-Form produces protective cases and pads for a variety of devices and even you knees and elbows.

JamesRL
JamesRL

It might surprise you to know that there are a great many things that exist outside the US of A, including 5 pin bowling. In Canada, we have both. I prefer 5 pin. The ball is smaller, and it is more difficult to get a strike because there isn't as much pin knocking down pin action. Throw a ball perfectly straight down the lane and you can take out one pin.

dogknees
dogknees

I don't live in the USA, I am well aware that there are things outside it. Indeed, most things are.

Stargzer
Stargzer

It was a protest against some proposed laws in the US dealing with intellectual property rights and copyrights, so it was only the English Language site that was darkened (en.wikipedia.org); they reportedly used a Javascript to do it, so it may have looked for US sites only. They left a work-around for emergencies, and someone else published another workaround, but I just waited it out.

Stargzer
Stargzer

JamesRL: Thanks for the link! I found the C5PBA specifications manual at the link you gave. The 5-pins look similar to Duckpins, which don't have the band that the 5-pins do. I can see from the layout that there is a lot of space between the pins, so not only accuracy but a different aiming strategy probably come into play. In Duckpins, without the mass of the 10-pin ball, you have to come in at just the right angle between the #1 pin and the #2 or #3 pin to get a strike. Maybe I'm searching the wrong things; during a recent search to find an oil burner part available near my home, Google gave me too many obvious advertisements for online sources and eBay sources. I just wanted a local distributor (which I finally found)! Most of the stuff I look for in Wikipedia seems to be well-documented and usually well-written, but I will edit a link if I follow one and it takes me to the wrong place.

JamesRL
JamesRL

I've never seen it in Ontario, perhaps in New Brunwick, which borders Maine.

Slayer_
Slayer_

Its working fine for me, I saw in another post that google was doing the same, again, its working for me, both .com and .ca

splainin2do
splainin2do

There's also Candlepin bowling; I believe it's found only in some areas of New England & Ohio (USA), and eastern Canada. 10 straight pins (reminicent of candlesticks) and the largest ball weight 2.7lbs. 3 balls are thrown per box, and felled pins stay and can be used in play. Lots of fun- I've been in leagues for over 10 years. :)

Stargzer
Stargzer

The US also has Duckpin bowling, ten pins which are smaller and use a smaller ball. They suppposedly got their name from the way they "scatter like a flock of ducks" when hit just right. (I suspect 5-pin may be Duckpins, but I can't look up 5-pin right now since Wikipedia is dark for their SOPA and PIPA protest.) Note: I keep a tenpin in the office to catch the unwary with a bad pun, which pun is harder to bring into play these days. I ask people, "Do you remember those 25-pin and 9-pin connectors they used to have on the back of computers? Well, I have a pin that fits a 10-pin connector." (Pull out the tenpin for display) When they've finished groaning, I tell them I also have a pin that fits a Duckpin connector.