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Google Chrome for business: It's ready for you, even if you're not ready for it

Google Chrome's business selling point? Businesses can take advantage of "improved security and web application performance" without breaking the bank on other expensive software licenses or new hardware.

Google's Chrome browser is ready for the workplace, updated and enhanced so that IT folks can not only deploy it on office computers but can also starting testing those Web apps - just in case the company is thinking about switching to the Chrome OS platform when it goes live next year.

That's the bigger message in an announcement today about enhancements to the Chrome browser. In a post on its Enterprise blog, the company wrote:

...Chrome offers controls that enable IT administrators to easily configure and deploy the browser on Windows, Mac, and Linux according to their business requirements. We've created an MSI installer that enables businesses who use standard deployment tools to install Chrome for all their managed users. We've also added support for managed group policy with a list of policies and a set of templates that allow administrators to easily customize browser settings to manage security and privacy.

The selling point: businesses can take advantage of "improved security and web application performance" without breaking the bank on other expensive software licenses or new hardware. Who could say no to something like that?

More importantly, though, Google seems to be trying to lure businesses into a Chrome environment before the big rollout of Chrome OS next year. At an event last week, the company showcased the OS and even started a pilot program to hand out free Chrome-powered notebooks so that real users - consumers, businesses, bloggers like me - to start putting Chrome OS through some early tests.

The jury is still out on whether Chrome OS - and the browser-only Chrome notebooks due out in mid-2011 - will gain any real traction against Microsoft's Windows, Apple's Mac OS X or Linux. But Google is being proactive about trying to get businesses to start thinking about alternative operating systems and Google's take on Web-based applications.

Google suggests that companies interested in deploying these features will be ahead of the game - but the one that's really ahead of the game here is Google, which hopes to get business customers interested in a technology that's not even available yet.

Also see:

This is a guest post from Sam Diaz, Senior Editor at ZDNet, TechRepublic's sister site. You can follow Sam on his ZDNet blog Between the Lines (or subscribe to the RSS feed).

12 comments
Tony Hopkinson
Tony Hopkinson

it, then maybe, just maybe, it's really not ready for us....

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

What do I gain by going to the trouble of replacing IE? I'm not breaking the bank on expensive licenses; it's already deployable by .MSI (it's already installed); it's already manageable by group policy (heck, it's already managed too).

jdev1
jdev1

Following months of using IE8 and Spyware free, installed chrome. Two weeks analysis revealed up to thirty Spyware and Tracker cookies. Dumped chrome until evidence of others. Oh and also dumped IE9 beta trial here showed too buggy

Slayer_
Slayer_

have it install properly to program files? If not, then froget them.

Angel_Tech
Angel_Tech

once again, it seems Google is a step ahead of Firefox.. Chrome ADM template is something that makes things easier for IT admins, something that Firefox has not been 100% into it and fans were claiming for that.. I like to have options when it's about deploying software that our end-users ask. Certainly, this makes easier to manage.. Im not really a fan of Google but I cant deny its popularity among end users.. Cheers :)

Gis Bun
Gis Bun

Google wants us to believe thiat a "new" Linux distro will be soooooo secure. How about centralized management? Is there an AV package that can be managed centrally? How about what the user can or can't install? After all most of the malware on systems come from crap that users may have installed on their own system. How about printing? If the user logs in can they automatically see the apps they need, network printers ready for them [without the user having to find them]? Nope. And it is still a Linux distro. So it has all the golod and bad that Linux offers.

Jellimonsta
Jellimonsta

The new Google Chrome browser is inherently more secure than IE (or even Firefox). It sandboxes the processes so that there is no process leakage between tabs. IE on the other hand has its hooks in the OS kernel and we have all seen how well that protects against malware and virus. :p http://threatpost.com/en_us/blogs/google-adds-flash-sandbox-chrome-browser-120110 Edit to add: I have long been an Opera user, but when Google brought out their sandboxing feature, I had to make the switch. I used to use FF with Noscript, but FF is just too much of a pig. Chrome is fast, and now secure. Add the ad-block and ie-tab extensions and I am a happy camper with Chrome after being very hesitant to embrace it.

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

Another naming mistake, reminiscent of Microsoft's 'Windows Explorer' / 'Internet Explorer' error.

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

I use it because it offers the plug-ins I want, ones that don't seem to have Chrome equivalents. I'm also concerned with Google's potential tracking. Gods know there are features of IE I strongly dislike from a personal viewpoint, and I wouldn't run it at the house. However, at work behind a firewall and anti-malware apps, and keeping the patches applied, I'm not going to lie away on the security issues. Compatibility with Sharepoint becomes an overriding concern. I haven't seen a problem I could attribute to IE since early in version 6.

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