Broadband

IPv6: Why is it needed?

Converting to IPv6 is a major undertaking and possibly why there aren’t more network administrators excited about it. This podcast will shed some light on why IPv6 is needed and actually beneficial.

Podcast

I'm very excited to have Mr. Joe Klein here today to talk about IPv6. Joe is a senior IPv6 security researcher for Command Information and has many professional accreditations. Finally, and more to the point, Joe is considered by many to be a leading expert in IPv6 and is a member of the North American IPv6 Task Force. Listen to the podcast.

What's the podcast trying to answer?

This podcast tries to point out why transitioning to IPv6 is important and inevitable. It especially tries to answer the following questions:

  • What are the benefits of IPv6?
  • Is IPv4 really on its last leg?
  • What about security and the fact that internal device IP addresses aren't hidden any more?
  • What if I change my network to IPv6 today, will it work correctly?
Additional notes

I have linked Joe's entire presentation, "Joe Klein Hope Presentation" (pdf) because it has all sorts of pertinent information about transitioning to IPv6. There are three slides specific to this podcast, and I have added them below:

slide-1.JPG

slide-2.JPG

slide-3.JPG

Final thoughts

I would very much like to thank Joe for his willingness to spend time explaining a pretty complex subject. I also would like to thank one of my heroes Sonja Thompson, TechRepublic Senior Editor, for holding my hand and getting this podcast out.

About

Information is my field...Writing is my passion...Coupling the two is my mission.

31 comments
skywalker80
skywalker80

I heard that Ipv6 will make bound of two worlds - flexibility of datagram subnet and quaranty of quality that provide virtal circuit subnet. Is this true? Will this provide QoS over public Internet even for business critical aplications?

owaispathan
owaispathan

fantastic info :) it really worth much better than IPv4..

Dumphrey
Dumphrey

Another good one. Lots of info, will be listening to it again.

JCitizen
JCitizen

In one short sweet communication I got more information than in all the instruction I got in my CCNA and MCSE seminars! Also thanks to Joe for the .PDF and the illustrations, a picture is worth a thousand words, and podcasts are great for the mobile among us!

Gate keeper
Gate keeper

First of all great podcast ! @ 03:50 joe says "V6 has a concept called multicast which is called broadcast in the V4 world" when he was talking about the differences between IPV4 & IPV6 .... But IPV4 does have the ability to multicast and which is different from broadcast in IPV4 .. can you clarify that point ? and can you touch on IPV6 Anycast ? I've read it on the TCP/IP guide but i still cant make heads or tails of it. if you already were planning to go over it, in your upcoming podcasts .. ignore this.

w2ktechman
w2ktechman

However the thought of dumping equipment and purchasing all new equipment can be a much harder sell to the powers at be. Also, should this be more towards the ISP's to implement first? One would think it should start there and move out.

Michael Kassner
Michael Kassner

I consider myself fortunate to be able to have Mr. Joe Klein (IPv6 expert) talk about why IPv6 is important. Once you get done laughing at me, please listen as Joe has a lot of good stuff to say. By the way this is the first of three podcasts with Joe. So stay tuned.

skywalker80
skywalker80

My question is: I heard that IPv6 header will have fields "flow label", and "DS byte" (differentiated services byte) - technologies that need to provide QoS. Does it means that in future,technicaly, company can build VPN with QoS for business critical aplications (like QoS MPLS provide today)but only using public Internet as backbone, not service provider's backbone (like MPLS use). Thanks

Michael Kassner
Michael Kassner

I'm sorry, but I don't quite understand your first question. As for the second question, an expert made the following remark: "IPv6 provides QOS, but if you are not native IPv6?if you are tunneling through the IPv4 internet, your packets become enveloped in IPv4 and transported by IPv4, so the QOS features of IPv4 will apply during that transit.

jsklein
jsklein

Sorry, I did not add enough words to succinctly describe what I meant to say. Guess I should have had other cup of coffee before I spoke. In IPv4, the concept of multicast exists, but was never implemented end-to-end, mainly due to ISP?s unwillingness to enable the feature on the backbone routers. Then NAT?ed firewalls arrived to block broadcasts by default. Later, it became a problem getting any multicast addresses. I understand that no more IPv4 multicast address are available as of June 2008. IPv6, with it?s dependence on multicast for proper operation, and additional address space can allow even a home user, to have 4 billion (/96) multicast addresses that can be as global scoped. This technique is known as Unicast prefix-based multicast and should be all the rage, as IPv6 is implemented. Again, I am sorry for the confusion.

jsklein
jsklein

What you will find, is that most equipment has the ability (CPU, Memory, etc) to run IPv6, the problem is the vendors have made minimal movement towards IPv6. Mainly because the hardware vendors want to sell more stuff. The ISP's in the US are moving to IPv6 very slowly. I think NTT is the only vendor that has both IPv4/6 services at this moment. The rest tunnel your IPv6 traffic over IPv4.

Michael Kassner
Michael Kassner

I'm not sure that's required, only because I have two more podcasts that attempt to address your issues. My sincere and ultimate goal is to raise member's awareness of IPv6 and it's imminent deployment. W2kTechman, I totally respect your capabilities, so the fact that you are asking these sorts of questions means that may be I'm making somewhat of an impact. In my research, I must admit that my respect for IPv6 grows on a daily basis. It's the right way to go and once understood will be a huge Ah Hah moment for most network admins.

pcexpertq8
pcexpertq8

i saw IPv6 only in VISTA , so how can i use it in XP PRO ? thanks.

CameronY
CameronY

Many thanks for the pod cast. Very informative. Cheers, Cameron

Jellimonsta
Jellimonsta

Another fine podcast. I look forward to installments 2 and 3.

Michael Kassner
Michael Kassner

Hello, Skywalker I'm trying to get the exact answer for you. I've passed the question on to an expert.

skywalker80
skywalker80

Thanks for reply mr.Michael, My question is: I heard that IPv6 header will have fields "flow label", and "DS byte" (differentiated services byte) - technologies that need to provide QoS. Does it means that in future,technicaly, company can build VPN with QoS for business critical aplications (like QoS MPLS provide today)but only using public Internet as backbone, not service provider's backbone (like MPLS use). Thanks

JCitizen
JCitizen

I like the professional approach you took. I got too much German in me not to appreciate that! =)

Gate keeper
Gate keeper

for clearing that up, I was just curious and I thought there was something that i was missing. Multicasting with applying the necessary scope is much better than broadcasting.

Michael Kassner
Michael Kassner

To install the IPv6 protocol for Windows XP with SP2 or later, do the following: 1. Log on to the computer with a user account that has privileges to change network configuration. 2. Click Start, click Control Panel, and then double-click Network Connections. 3. Right-click any local area connection, and then click Properties. 4. Click Install. 5. In the Select Network Component Type dialog box, click Protocol, and then click Add. 6. In the Select Network Protocol dialog box, click Microsoft TCP/IP version 6, and then click OK. 7. Click Close to save changes to your network connection. Alternately, from the Windows XP desktop, click Start, point to Programs, point to Accessories, and then click Command Prompt. At the command prompt, type netsh interface ipv6 install. For the IPv6 protocol for Windows XP with SP1, do the following: 1. Log on to the computer with a user account that has privileges to change network configuration. 2. Click Start, click Control Panel, and then double-click Network Connections. 3. Right-click any local area connection, and then click Properties. 4. Click Install. 5. In the Select Network Component Type dialog box, click Protocol, and then click Add. 6. In the Select Network Protocol dialog box, click Microsoft IPv6 Developer Edition, and then click OK. 7. Click Close to save changes to your network connection. Alternately, from the Windows XP desktop, click Start, point to Programs, point to Accessories, and then click Command Prompt. At the command prompt, type netsh interface ipv6 install. To install the IPv6 protocol for Windows XP with no service packs installed: 1. Log on to the computer running Windows XP with a user account that has privileges to change network configuration. 2. Open a command prompt. From the Windows XP desktop, click Start, point to Programs, point to Accessories, and then click Command Prompt. 3. At the command prompt, type ipv6 install. Regardless of the version of Windows XP, to use RPC applications over IPv6, you must first restart the computer.

Michael Kassner
Michael Kassner

There's at least two more podcasts as well as other written question and answers from experts coming.

skywalker80
skywalker80

My question is: I heard that IPv6 header will have fields "flow label", and "DS byte" (differentiated services byte) - technologies that need to provide QoS. Does it means that in future,technicaly, company can build VPN with QoS for business critical aplications (like QoS MPLS provide today)but only using public Internet as backbone, not service provider's backbone (like MPLS use). Thanks

JCitizen
JCitizen

you're doing a bang up job on TR Michael! No worries! I've had a lot of projects lately, so I appologize for not getting to the newest stories lately! I've been messing with privately owned Mcard cable devices and workiing with the ISP on functionality. I think they are excited about this particular project as they can lower their infrastructure costs and pass it off to the consumer. Which is just as well because their outdated equipment is the pitts! Keep up the good work!

Michael Kassner
Michael Kassner

Hey J, German huh, yet another piece in the puzzle that is JCitizen.

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