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Learn more about Cisco's CCIE: Do you have what it takes?

Cisco CCIE recruiter Eman Conde gives an overview of the CCIE certification, the job outlook for CCIEs, and what you can do to get started.

Cisco began the CCIE program back in 1993 as a way to single out those professionals who had the ability to support their solutions. Originally there was only the CCIE certification, and it was earned by taking a written exam and then a two-day lab in San Jose. The original proctor, Stuart Biggs was awarded the second CCIE number 1025 after the first number was awarded to the room the lab was held in, in San Jose. So #1024 is part of a plaque which was moved from the original lab to a newer lab in the same campus.

The first CCIE was Terry Slattery, #1026, an ambitious and energetic network engineer who was at the time working with a team to develop the CLI (command line interface) used to configure or program routers. The program became popular as more IT professionals were drawn to the technologies which made data communications work. The prerequisite for taking the exam and lab was experience because there were no commercially available training resources available in the beginning of the program. There was a training program offered at Cisco, but it was focused on those individuals who already had a good degree of experience.

Since those heady days back in the beginning, an industry has emerged to help provide the skilled professionals needed to sell, design, build and support Cisco solutions. Here are the current certifications:

  • CCNT
  • CCNA
  • CCDA
  • CCNP
  • CCDP
  • CCIP
  • CCSP
  • CCVP
  • CCDE

These certifications are valid for three years, but the CCIE is valid for two. Recertification is required to maintain these certifications and to keep them active.

The value of the certification as a measure of skill is debatable and this topic has been kicked around in many forums. The value to the Cisco reseller community is more objective. Cisco resellers are given discounts for the purchase of hardware that they in turn resell based on the number of certified individuals on their staffs.

The Cisco reseller certification ranks these VARs as Select, Premier, Silver, Gold and Global. With each level come rewards and benefits that allow the VAR to earn higher discounts and other incentives. With each level come requirements for technical competency and ultimately as Silver, Gold or Global partner, the ranking requires a staff that includes CCIEs. Because of the pressure put on Cisco Channel Resellers to hire or develop CCIEs ,there have been incidents such as holding CCIE numbers hostage (refusing to release them for use with another employer), incidents of counterfeit credentials, CCIE number association renting, and poaching talent from competitors.

The highest paid Certified IT professionals are CCIEs partially because of the demand for them and partially because of the small population. The CCIE certification opens doors internationally for the network engineer because the skills are portable and in demand in virtually every country on the globe. There have been some great strides in developing talent and Cisco has been right there to monitor and support the hiring of talent through the SRS (Strategic Recruitment Solutions) Program and the Cisco Partner Talent Portal.

The number of CCIEs globally has remained below 21,000 for several years making this population of certified IT professionals truly elite. Becoming a CCIE is easier today with many training options available for career minded networking professionals. Cisco's Network Academy program is an industry model for developing talent. This program boasts that over a million students have gone through the curriculum at some level, globally. Besides this program Cisco has certified individuals as CCSIs (Certified Cisco System Instructor) and some training companies as CLPs (Cisco Learning Partner) where the Cisco Authorized curriculum is taught. Those companies that do not use the Cisco authorized materials and curriculums are referred to as "Grey Market" training companies. There are many CCIEs who have benefitted from both types of companies and Cisco does not require lab candidates to pass through a CLP. Cisco training is a big industry and there are several giants in this arena that have succeeded in winning a substantial market share. As with any product you can purchase though, buyer beware!

Start at the beginning if you are interested in pursuing CCIE certification as a goal and you do not have the benefit of professional exposure to support this goal. The CCNA certification and subsequent certifications support interests in Routing and Switching, Voice over IP, Wireless and security. The best way to prepare for this certification is to examine the available study and preparation methods, since we all learn differently. There are self-paced materials available in many forms; instructor led classes; and high schools, colleges and junior colleges have networking offered as a degree elective or option.

What aspects of Cisco technology, certifications, or training would you like to learn more about? Leave your questions, topics of interest, and suggestions in the discussion below.

About

Emmanuel Conde has the distinction of being the only CCIE recruiter promoted by World Wide Channels of Cisco Systems.

52 comments
steelejedi4
steelejedi4

I have wanted to study for the CCIE qualification for some time now but see below. I have to agree in some respects with BORRIE, and again with ROBERT THOMPSON. I found the CCNA course expensive, especially as the distance learning provider changed the course at Cisco's behest half way through, and I was told I had to start from the beginning again. I also have the dilema that I am as I would say qualified to a standard, all financed by myself, yet do I get the job because of my lwearning ability and the certifications I hold. NO!! Because I have no experience. UHM! Surely some employer needs some one qualified to this standard, but with a fresh look at the process, experience set you into a mind of thinking, and sometimes it can be hard to see things differently, where as I with no experience can be open minded about problems, and their resolution. But still no joy, and I will need to re certify in 2012, will it be wothwhile me doing the whole process again without the knowlwdge or experince gained from actual work in the arena

sameertsm
sameertsm

Nice post. Can you give more details on the CCIE Voice Track?

Brad
Brad

Dual CCIE #18532 R&S/Security - George Morton, a rabid aficionado of CCIE statistics and calculations, is projecting 255 newly minted Cisco CCIEs for 2010. According to Morton's calculation, 2010 will see approximately 2,595 fewer newly minted CCIEs than 2009. Why? Well, learn more... http://www.bradreese.com/blog/ccie-6-4-2010.htm Sincerely, Brad Reese

05bca054
05bca054

i think CCIE's have great salary packages offered by the MNC's and i don't like programming as i am in the IT proffetional area.so i think networking is the best option and now i am going to do CCNA+secutity,CCSP AND CCIE in SECURITY.

gregnelson4u
gregnelson4u

This is a great article and i feel really encouraged by it. I am presently into I.T but the fundamentals, and would like to earn the CCIE certification, but like the writer said that the best way is to start from the beginning, i do not know how to go about any of it and would need all the assistance i can get in acquiring the CISCO recommended training materials. Thanks..

Mycah Mason
Mycah Mason

Minor point, but it is CCENT (Cisco Certified Entry Networking Technician). Eternal949 CCENT :-)

smj165
smj165

Please advice me on the best and easy preparation method of CCIE in security.

jeremial-21966916363912016372987921703527
jeremial-21966916363912016372987921703527

The CCIE is something I've always wanted to pursue, partly because the man who mentored me held that cert years ago. I've held an MCSE:Security and other certifications for some years, and decided two years ago to get started on this path. Our company uses Training Camp for IS folks, and I have taken a number of their boot camp style courses. For those with experience, I think these are great; I would much rather devote 7-14 20 hours days than 12-15 weeks meeting 3 times a week for a couple hours. The class I took was the CCNA/CCDA. It was definitely a challenge; the first day our instructor told us "forget everything Microsoft has told you about routing and switching, we're here to learn to do it right". While I came away still an MS admin, I think the knowledge is invaluable, and am glad I went. I don't find much benefit in the CCDA, personally, but for some there might be. I'm hoping this summer or next winter to take the CCNP, and continue toward the CCIE goal.

efficacy
efficacy

Thank you, this is highly informative, I am currently considering the ccie as the next bet before my ccna exprires in october. I must take the ccie writen by then and still have 18months to prepare for the lap. I don't want to go through the ccsp due to the cost of 4 modules training and exams, i intend and really trying it out my self. please advise me on your best opinion concerning this decision. thanks. efficacy.group@yahoo.com

Tonie16
Tonie16

Thank you for this post. I'm a CCNA studying for my CCNP, I would also like to become a CCIE day. But it takes a few years to get there.

johnspencer.ccie
johnspencer.ccie

One thing the article does not mention is getting experience. Start with CCNA, CCNP etc, but get experience also. Experience doesnt replace learning and learning doesnt replace experience. John Spencer, CCIE 14405, CCSI 23365 Network Architect.

hegeman
hegeman

A great place to start is at howtonetwork.net They have some excellent training materials which I personally used to get my CCNA training and to ultimately pass the CCNA exam. It is an excellent resource, there are great forums and a place to bounce ideas off of two current CCIE's! Take a look and if you decide to join the site (the price is really reasonable) let them know that hegeman sent you. Thanks!

borrierulez
borrierulez

Hey, I'm a CCNA and I want to become a CCNP but i face 2 problems. First is you won't be hired to work for a big company to do more complex networking tasks because you don't have the experience and you can't get the experience if they don't hire you.. Second is the cost, I found a College here in Belgium but the cost of the course is around 4000? for a one year course. This is really too expensive for me. (And the private courses are even more expensive..) What can you suggest for someone in my position? Kind regards, Borrie

darbyweaver
darbyweaver

Morton's numbers are great for the "aggregate numbers"... Perhaps. However, if we look at the number of people who passed, who dropped, and from which tracks we can quickly surmise that "NEWLY MINTED" CCIE's are increasing at a fairly decent rate actually. The truth to the matter is that a lot of CCIE's are dropping from the program at a rate higher than new CCIE's can make up the difference for. The result is that the CCIE population is becoming a little stagnant and not dropping. As for the stats disappearing, I think this is a mystery both inside of Cisco and outside of Cisco. Who's the webmaster? On a more positive note: Brad and Eman are posting near real-time on a thread and no blood anywhere... If you guys have put aside your differences, then maybe there is more hope for the CCIE Program even in these seemingly dismal times. Good luck guys! Darby

CCIE Agent
CCIE Agent

After speaking with several Cisco Systems employees responsible for the actual numbers I will be getting updates on the stats. It will be interesting to see if the doom and gloom cloud does pass without the demise of the CCIE program predicted by some. Brad I would like to personally thank you for the response and look forward to a new era in collaboration with you.

CCIE Agent
CCIE Agent

The best paying jobs from my experience (remember that I cater to the Cisco Resellers though) CCIE (any track)doing Pre-Sales (get commissions as part of their package) CCIE Voice independent contracting or with VAR doing Pre-Sales or Project Management CCIE Security with large financial company or in DOD/DOE in the USA or PM/PRE Sales CCIE R&S Architect/Design CCIE S/P most often as Dual-cert'ed and in ISP in senior role or Pre-Sales We have seen trends in the industry though and the largest population remains R&S. The trends are turning now on the technologies being made popular. Good steady are is R&S next is Voice but the new Unified Computing push is creating jobs just like Wireless has. Best bet is to follow your passions though because the best interviews are with people speaking from their heart and soul and that fuels the passion you reveal in a one-on-one.

CCIE Agent
CCIE Agent

Wow this is a big order. It can be as simple as contacting the Cisco Network Academy, local university or junior college, training company (and there are many)or shadowing the network engineer at work. I managed a TAC and NOC for a large telco in the USA and we had great options for mentoring and knowledge sharing. There are also groups like in Egypy the Egyptian Networkers I help launch their countrywide network of professionals when I was in Cairo. Try LinkedIn for groups of network professionals like the CCIE Network I launched but there are many many more. I don't have all the answers so growing your professional network in the many forums available will help.

CCIE Agent
CCIE Agent

Oops! I should have done another edit.

CCIE Agent
CCIE Agent

There is no easy method to achieve any of the CCIE tracks. Getting on the job experience is best couple with learning in the way you do best. Lots of folks like boot camps but the unhappy ones usually took a trianing style that did not work for them even though they picked a trainer or training company. I am personally very active in training initiatives which are affordable but from instructors you can research. Please have a look at my blog www.ccieagent.com for that or my eMagazine www.ccieflyer.com

CCIE Agent
CCIE Agent

I cannot over state the importance a mentor can play. If you have a mentor who can advise you on your journey it will be easier from the perspective of clarity at the very least. I speak with students in many countries in person as I travel with the Cisco HR Talent Forums. In Athens I met over a hundred Network Academy students and there are several who discovered mentors through our discussions and from the network they became a part of out here in the ether. A mentor look in your network I bet there's a good one there.

CCIE Agent
CCIE Agent

John, Thanks for dropping in as a CCIE with a short number you have seen this indistry change. One thing lost that I really miss is the opportunity employers used to give people to learn doing it. We had to hack our ways through problems, configuartions and implementations sometimes and that was a great learning experience for me.

drroysingh
drroysingh

Borrie, there is a lot of information on the CCNP on the NET. Also, you can buy the electronic version of the CCNP book and pick it up from there.

robert.thompson
robert.thompson

Borrie, I started out being in the same position. Money was a factor until I put my faith in myself and built my own labs. Courses are over rated in so much as they don't always deliver the goods. Spend money on good Cisco books and lab equipment. (Jeoff Doyle and the books he wrote will help you build your routing fundamentals. Guaranteed!!) Start small and build your way up. Look around for cheap kit. Ebay is good but is not always cheap. Stick to Ciscopress books and Cisco's training pages. Join the certification group at Cisco. To achieve your CCIE, you need to be focused and it starts by thinking differently to others. Be bold and feel totally confident. When I started out ,there was absolutely nothing like you have today. Those that won't hire now will be looking for a CCIE one day and by then you may even have your own practice. Don't feel you can't achieve this. It can be done with hard, focused and driven work. It starts with you making that decision. Hope this help Robert Thompson, CCIE#10302

paguj
paguj

Hi Borrie, Once you have done CCNA you are on your way to whatever certification you want. You dont need to join any training. you can buy videos online. it is cheaper than joining a course. you can do practicles on the simulator or spend money in buying hardware rather than doing a course. you spend money to do a course for once only but you can use your hardwares for longtime. I don't know whether this works for you or not.

CCIE Agent
CCIE Agent

I have been working on a personal innitiative to reduce the price of training from Boot Camp instructors. Last year the prices for R&S where over $3,000 since I announced the Nigerian boot camps at $1,499 for R&S and SP several training companies caught wind of our success and reduced prices in the USA to $1,900 - $1,800 and they stopped posting their prices on-line. We are targeting severl US locations, India and Eastern Europe now for what I call CCIE Expos. Soon we will announce the dates and locations. Keep an eye on the CCIE Flyer and this post.

Lwood
Lwood

I went through the Cisco Academy ciriculum all the way up to the CCNP level. If I had it all to over again, I think I would've just self studied through the ciruculum using products like cisco press, trainsignal, and cbtnuggets. If you had those materials in combination with a small lab...you can get through the exams. BTW - I didn't even have the CCNA before being hired by a fortune 500 company and survived. You have to interview your way into the organization by knowing your trade. Four years later, I witnessed potential employees who had passed the CCIE written but couldn't answer my CCNP level EIGRP questions not make it to round two of interviews.

ifican
ifican

Of course nothing makes up for a great instructor when it comes to efficiency of learning. But certifications are not the end all and not necessary. Our field is one that a certification may set you apart from an equally qualified candidate but is not needed to succeed. I work for a very large software company and do most of the interviews for prospective candidates. Though i hold more than my share of certifications i / we do not require them. If you are good, know your stuff and can fit in, i could care less about your certification status. I have interviewed ccie's that i swear had someone else take the test for them, and have interviewed folks with not a single cert that i have hired. If you have the drive to succeed and the perseverance to chase it. You will eventually get there. Then you will find yourself in a place you can go take your ccnp for instance and not have had to study much at all. If you love networking, not because you think its going to make you alot of money, but love it because of what it is. You will find yourself successful down the road, just keep at it.

o2463c
o2463c

Get in the IP field first then do advanced certifications. Find something, then impress your employer. I started as a guy who did shipping in the afternoon, and soldering in the morning, for a very small company, did some IT work, used that experience to get a job a deployment of desktops. They saw I was comfortable in a wiring closet, and let me be the network engineer?s hands and eyes. Used that experience to land a job in a NOC, got my CCNA there. Took a contracting gig as a jr network engineer, move back to field services but in the network arena. Well current job is with a Fortune 50 company as a Sr. Network Engineer. Small steps, no short cuts, work hard get rewarded. BTW I have been on this path for 12 years now.

Brad
Brad

Back on July 28, 2008 I received an email from Fred Weiller - Director of Marketing for Learning@Cisco who provided Cisco's official response to the problem of its CCIE statistics being continuously out-of-date: "We are in the process of transitioning this information to the Cisco Learning Network where it will be automatically updated." That was almost 2 years ago. In the meantime, you can view the following 10-year Cisco CCIE count: http://www.bradreese.com/worldwide-ccie-count.htm Sincerely, Brad Reese

christopherreynolds78
christopherreynolds78

Another suggestion would be to check out the Cisco Learning Network website. https://learningnetwork.cisco.com/index.jspa?ciscoHome=true There you can find a lot of the information you might seek to get you pointed in the right direction. There are also a lot of good people on there that are very willing to help you figure out problems and answer questions as you go down your path. I have started down my path a few months ago. Finished the CCENT, and will be looking to finish the CCNA shortly, but no idea how far I am looking to take it... if it will be a CCIE or not. I have also seen it suggested to people to even take a look at some Network+ stuff before jumping into the Cisco track, but that is to people that have done nothing in the field and looking to get some barrings of what is going on with networks. (sometimes it helps, sometimes not) Anyways... Good Luck with whichever path you choose.

drroysingh
drroysingh

CCIE Agent: I would assume at that time, the industry was young. You had a lot of standardization issues early then and had to buy from the same vendor or for two dissimilar vendor devices to work, you had to reprogram and go through all that stuff....

johnspencer.ccie
johnspencer.ccie

Fully agree, the journey on the road to CCIE, was an interesting one and possibly as interesting if not more than the achievement. The CCIE may open doors, but experience, attitude and ability to take initiative are key to employers also not just the number. Its all IP now, but just this morning I discovered some IPX in a network we are migrating. Without earlier knowledge and experience that could have been missed and cost the client more in downtime. At one time even the CCNA had, Appletalk and IPX, token ring etc so the skill set was broader. ISDN and DLSW+ came out of the lab, but I still see it. Good luck to all who embark on the journey but it can be an arduous one, although there is more study material available now and the track is mainly IP now, but in the real world it can be different. John Spencer CCIE 14405, CCDP, CCSI 23365

borrierulez
borrierulez

Hey, I want to thank everyone for the positive comments, I've already downloaded some courses and will use gns3 to set up the lab environments. I'll get there! :) Thanks again

Dardha
Dardha

I agree with buying hardware.That will not only help you get your certifications but also your experience.It's like already working on a company, put up a scenario where you manage a network with a router and one or two switches, and start configuring like you were given a job. I started first with IT Essentials course, at that time I was very young and after a year or so I started working on a Computer Service, and from there jumped directly to an ISP environment, where not for much time I ended on their NOC.After that got my CCNA cert. Note, i didnt have any certifications when I first joined on the ISP environment, but when you are near a big building, start planting beautiful flowers , the owners of the big building will be impressed by your work on your specific field, they will open the doors for you and from there you can take the elevator or the stairs to go upper :)

drroysingh
drroysingh

I like this statement: "If you have the drive to succeed and the perseverance to chase it. You will eventually get there."

radika23
radika23

I agree with you. I feel it is better to take the exam after some initial real world experience in managing and troubleshooting.

amanr
amanr

This is very correct. Certs while being good, don't mean much if you are put in front of a router and don't know how to spell config t! Practical experience is irreplaceable when it comes to being a network engineer. Books can only get you so far. From my experience I'd choose someone with experience over someone with certs. But these days employers tend to look for both. But a true engineer hardly has time to study for something as demanding as a CCIE, perhaps it is for the money chasers only...

SmartAceW0LF
SmartAceW0LF

Having worked for a Cisco Gold Partner in the past and having observed the hard work of many of the Engineers within that organization in acheiving their CCIEs, I do sincerely apologize if the following statement offends but it is hard for me to imagine an encounter with a CCIE who appeared to be anything short of a World-Class Network Engineer. This certificate is/deserves/should be regarded with maximum respect. I have not met a one that failed in any way to be the genuine "go-to man" for ANY wan-related issue. You could bet even money that once escalated to Level III, (CCIE) that whatever the elusive resolution turned out to be, that it would be resolved and resolved in very short order. A matter of minutes in most cases. Was it the certification that made them so skilled? Surely a matter of perspective I suppose. But, ask yourself how much you are willing to fork out to put your skills to task? Of the small handful I knew personally, none passed the labs the first time around. At that time the labs alone were over 2500.00 plus room, board, transportation, etc. Not an endeavor to leap into in a frivolous manner. The salaries they are paid are through the roof in comparison to other certifications and that for good reason. I submit that if the reason they are compensated so well eludes you, you are most likely in no objective position to judge the merits of their skills, experience, education etc. Not to mention the value of their certification. When called to task, your scrutiny of their work for no more than a few moments will leave you assured of their expert ability to handle the issue. Theirs is no 30 day study course. They worked their a__es off to get there. If you are looking for smoke and mirrors or arrogance and flash, I agree you might not recognize a CCIE from the rest. But when you have spent already 4 to 5 times the amount of money you feel should have been necessary, and have ostensibly exhausted level I/II support resources, do yourself a favor. Stop wasting your time and money. Call the CCIE wherever he may be. Pay the outrageous price his skills demand. And when he leaves, thank him/her for his brief stay and silently acknowledge the disappointment you feel in knowing that you aren't free to call him FIRST! With all due respect, if you have a thing to interject about this one that sells its value or achievement short, do be careful, lest your interjection be more a reflection than you desire.

kevaburg
kevaburg

I have been working in IT in Germany for a number of years now and certification is just as important as having the experience. Why? There have been a number of instances whereby engineer error has resulted in a loss of data and insurance companies haven't paid out because "the engineer wasn't qualified for the job" and therefore should not have been in that position. Another reason why I say certification is important (and not simply necessary) is because during a period of self-study, it is only you and your study materials. Sometimes this can lead to gaps in knowledge that a course would have filled in nicely. Also, the instructor leading the course (blanket statement coming) has used not only his experience, but the experience of others to build his own course materials. To that end, you can call on an enormous wealth of knowledge that you would otherwise have missed. One example of this is a job I have shortly after completing my CCNA. Cisco state that EIGRP is proprietary to Cisco. To implement it, your network should have all Cisco routers or a means of redistribution into another routing protocol. Wrong. Experience has shown me that it can be implemented by HP and Nortel based networks as well. This is one example of how experience triumphs over certification and is certainly not unique. Using certification, we can determine how to accurately implement EIGRP in th efirst place and when we have questions, we know where to find the answers. So my take: Use the practical experience on the ground to build up experience in your chosen field. Use the certification process to confirm that knowledge and fill in the gaps.

derek
derek

Since I got out of the miltary in 1996, I had a hard time getting into the IT industry, long story short, I needed a few more folks like you in my life. I was an information security officer in the military, and back then, there were no certifications etc. I have been in the industry for 20yrs, and I agree... people skills, faithfulness, accountability, and teachability are skills that I have and look for in others... as a matter of fact most of the cert folks I run into need a certification in people skills as well. Thank you for letting someone like me know there are folks like you who are looking past the certs to the skills, character, and compentence of people. I imagine many of those who turned me down because of certs wish now that I was their employee, the 100+ clients, and growing managed services business... someone like you would have been someone I would have worked my tail off for....

borrierulez
borrierulez

Hey everyone, I totally agree with all of you to get in, that's how I started also, from pc technician to a system engineer now for one off the largest companies in Belgium. I'm also a CCNA, MCSE and MCITP so I also have had a long path behind me.. My work focusses mainly on microsoft systems but I want to grow more towards cisco systems, and having a CCNA and no experience managing a large network (routers, switches, not servers )just doesn't seem to get you in because most companies want you to have experience or a CCNP to get in and the CCNP course is just too expensive for me..

jw
jw

The post above is good advice. Experience is of huge importance along with the cert and education. Getting in and showing aptitude and interest is key. Getting a ccie # will involve many hours of practice time, on and off the job. When you enjoy it, the time flies. Even when you do get it, the learning only begins. Good Luck, Jason CCIE 8808

CCIE Agent
CCIE Agent

My first systems were back in 1973 I am an old fart so standardization was only a pipe dream.

CCIE Agent
CCIE Agent

Love your analogy about planting flowers. In the NOC environment I am sure you were then part of a group of professionals learning together and exposed to more senior skilled professionals, right? I have spoken to many about the think tanks that are usually formed by like minded people in an environment like NOCs and TACs. For those who look to ramp up their skills the quickest I think focusing on the Telco or ISP where they have NOCs and TACs is a good idea. I managed one near me here in Philadelphia and watched several of the engineers blossom into CCIEs and stronger network engineers. The pay is not glamorous but the opportunity to get some experience is invaluable.

SmartAceW0LF
SmartAceW0LF

The figure used was one I heard expressed from the CEO of the company. Could very well have his costs factored in.

kevaburg
kevaburg

As a hiring employer, what makes me happy is what a potential hire brings to my company. Sure, during the course of an interview, I can ask questions relating to the persons abilities. I can also talk to a previous employer about that persons function and capabilities in the role they had (even though that employer may not even know what they did!) and I will glean some information and confidence from what is said. But anyone can talk a good job. Certification, in cooperation with experience, confirms to me that not only has this candidate the skills of a CCNA/CCNP/CCIE, but has the confidence to take the relevant exams and confirm that knowledge base.

CCIE Agent
CCIE Agent

The two camps are both right it just depends on your tagted empoyer or market. Why certify if you don't need it proferssionaly? CCIEs ar eneeded to provide Cisco resellers with staff that qualifies them for discounts in product. What makes you happy?

CCIE Agent
CCIE Agent

The experience factor is often overlooked by many who treat the certification as a gold rush. I read many resumes every day and I talk to many CCIEs and Network engineers. Even more I speak with many hiring companies who require Cisco certified professionals. What they look for in a certified resource is experience. This often disapoints the network professional who tested out to get certified.