Networking

P2P is under attack, but is it attacking you?


A great deal is said about P2P in the media, and the government is starting to truly weigh in as P2P has been in the courts, the subject of FCC and FTC hearings, and Congressional action is on the table now. Unfortunately, nobody who knows how much P2P traffic there is has released that information. There are dozens of conflicting reports, but the latest large study (by Sprint in 2005) put that number at 6%, with regular Web traffic taking 50% of the pipe. These numbers would not seem to indicate a large enough problem to warrant legislation, but this wouldn't be the first time the government used skewed, old, or just plain wrong data to justify policy.

Internet Mysteries: How Much File Sharing Traffic Travels the Net? -- Update (Wired)

Of course, P2P has been in the courts lately, as TorrentSpy was handed a judgement of $111 million after refusing to turn over internal documents. In fact, you don't even have to host files or distribute copyrighted materials to draw a lawsuit as the creator of a popular BitTorrent search engine is finding out. But the biggest problem with P2P is that it provides a fertile playground for malware, as P2P is a somewhat common attack vector.

MPAA wins $111m from bankrupt TorrentSpy (ZDNet)

Isohunt Founder at Center of U.S. Torrent-Tracking Legal Battle (Wired)

Fake P2P media files lead to adware attack (Secure Computing)

At my old job, we didn't worry too much about P2P. Though we were in education, we did not have dorms, so student use was either from our computers (locked down) or their personal laptops (outside the firewall and using a Clean Access server). We had a Packeteer that we used to draw the flow down to a trickle, not blocking ports as the software reconfigures itself if it finds a blocked port. At the university where I now work, we have students living on campus in dorms, so P2P traffic is a much larger concern for us. What do you do with P2P traffic on your network?

7 comments
simon.child
simon.child

The way i read it is that P2P takes a 6% share of the bandwidth with Web traffic taking up 50% of the bandwidth not 6% of users using 50% of the bandwidth

DanLM
DanLM

Unless this is the primary application of any buisness, if they seen that type of network used by that small of a percentage of connections. It would be throttled or outlawed. It's unacceptable. How many business websites have slow connections because of this. I am not against p2p. I am against a small percentage of users hogging all the resources. And by your own statement, that is exactly what is happening. p2p should be throttled. Dan

Andy J. Moon
Andy J. Moon

It certainly seems easier for corporations who simply turn off the ability to use P2P software by closing ports or keeping the software from being installed in the first place. In education, we have to service our customers, and our largest customer base is students. What do you do to keep P2P traffic from overwhelming your network?

DanLM
DanLM

So much for me scanning these quickly at work.. Thanks for pointing out my misunderstanding. Dan

jc@dshs
jc@dshs

It looks to me like it says 6% of traffic is P2P and 50% of traffic is "normal" internet usage like web browsing, etc. I wonder what the other 44% traffic is for?

clubvikram
clubvikram

i have been using limewire and kazaa, but with in two months my system got corrupt and the data was lost. i feel iam being attacked.. clubvikram ----------------- This is a comprehensive addiction portal focusing on topics of alcohol and drug abuse. http://www.alcoholaddiction.org

ckelly
ckelly

I use a Packeteer and I put all the P2P apps I can find in a single folder and crush the crap out of it. I've had about 40 RIAA notices in the last 2 weeks and it gets old. Guntella is blocked completely now. If our university "customers" want that kind of service, they can go buy some from ClearWire. The pipe needs to be secured for all users with a lot of it going to university business. If I let the P2P run, it'll eat 50%+ of a 45m pipe easy. We've got 5 million bucks worth of fiber and switching equipment so we can get access to: List of infringing content: ---------------------------------------------- Justin Timberlake Sexy Back Keith Sweat Twisted Keith Sweat Nobody Korn Evolution Papa Roach Forever The Fray How To Save A Life Colbie Caillat Bubbly Common The People Twista Creep Fast Trace Adkins I Got My Game On Jason Aldean Laughed Until We Cried Mario Crying Out For Me T.I. Touchdown Birdman S On My Chest Mike Jones Still Tippin LOL

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