Networking

TR members: What wireless topics are of interest?

Writing for TechRepublic is a privilege. Along with this privilege I feel a responsibility to provide what the members and readers want. Hearing from you the readers will make sure I am doing just that.

Eight years ago when I became a TR member, it never occurred to me that someday I'd have the privilege of writing for TechRepublic. It's extremely special to me as I've realized one of my dreams. I'm not sure how many more will come true, but my son is doing great and I get to write. I'm very fortunate.

Million-dollar question

Along with this privilege I feel a responsibility to provide what the members and readers want. Since my area of expertise is wireless networking and its associated technology, I'd better stick to that. So, with those two things in mind, I'd like to ask a simple question:

What topics are of interest to you?

I have all sorts of ideas, and my editors have given me great direction, but what's of benefit to you is ultimately most important. So, let me know what would be of interest, and I'll do my best to provide results.

About

Information is my field...Writing is my passion...Coupling the two is my mission.

8 comments
DanLM
DanLM

;o) lol, you asked. Oh yea, how about including what card/usb wireless adapter to use also while your at it. Dan

peter
peter

I am trying to learn as much as I can about the new 11N hardware (I guess we're up to draft 2?). When I go to investigate an AP/router, I'd like to know if it can send/receive b/g 2.4Ghz AND n 5Ghz at the same time, or do I have to choose. I don't see that information readily available in the general documentation. Maybe I just don't know what to look for.

Michael Kassner
Michael Kassner

I'd like to thank the members that have commented on what they would like to see as wireless topics. I will try my best to accommodate each subject that was presented. If there are any additional subjects, please feel free to message me or add a comment here.

karen
karen

Security is ALWAYS a big concern for us with wireless. Having my bits flying around the air just naturally makes me nervous! Also, monitoring. I can see when my access-points are up and that all the interfaces, including radio are functioning, but if they've lost contact with the cable modem I use for dhcp and routing, that doesn't mean much to my users. If there was some way I could find an address on the other side of the access point to reliably ping that would save me having to send my helpdesk folks out regularly to check on my remote access points. I've looked into switching from standalone access points to using controllers, but it doesn't look like that would be much help. Also...gathering statistics on performance would be great as well as how best to integrate a wireless network with a wired network since, at least for now, almost everyone runs both. Thanks...I'm really looking forward to this topic area!!!

Michael Kassner
Michael Kassner

To make sure the topics I choose to write about are of interest to you.

nepenthe0
nepenthe0

Few wireless users actually achieve transfer rates approaching the hardware standards. The new 802.11n hardware is already being deployed, yet folks are saying that [i]other factors[/i] limit practical transfer rates to the [b]G[/b] standard. So my question for Mike Kassner: What are the bottlenecks to wireless transfer rates? Rick/Portland, OR

T Mike
T Mike

Hiya, Alot of thirsty minds out there asking about it & more and more new users daily. With all the brand spanking new units out there using wireless teck, trying to keep up-to-date with the new innovations can be taxing. Those tips n' tweaks are allways a welcome site,{pun intended}, and security is becoming forefront in many of the consumers minds. Broad subject there, wireless eh-thanks for taking it on !!

ThumbsUp2
ThumbsUp2

.... [b]Where to start[/b] if your office/building is not wireless yet, but the PTB's are considering moving in that direction? What has to be put into place to add wireless capabilities to an existing infrastructure, yet make it secure? For example, an office/building is "wired" and uses a router for DNS and firewall which is in turn connected to the ISP to get out to the internet. Everything is peer-to-peer, no domain yet because of the current conditions (can't expand). As the company grows, they've discovered there aren't enough wired ports around the building to plug everyone in, and the location of the existing ports doesn't necessarily accomodate reconfiguration of the office furniture to be able to seat everyone or add servers. Several 5-port switches are used to accomodate the number of terminals/printers that need to be "plugged in". Rewiring the building is desparately needed, to both upgrade the old wiring and provide more ports, as well as allow for conversion to a domain (server/workstations) type of set-up. But, is rewiring it (or at least adding to the existing wiring) the most cost-effective way of providing LAN/WAN access everywhere that it "might" be needed throughout the building? If this office/building were to ADD wireless capabilities to their existing configuration, the people who use laptops when they come and go in the office wouldn't need to have a port available to "plug into" when they arrive, thus freeing up ports for other uses (servers, printers, mass storage, etc...). Thus, the question, where to start? What has to be put into place [u]first[/u]? Also, once they do have the wireless in place, what should they make sure they do to ensure their security?