After Hours

Two good virtualization books for IT pros

Rick Vanover recommends two books on virtualization technology that you might consider buying for an IT pro friend or to share with colleagues in an IT department.

Earlier in the year, I mentioned three good books for virtualization reading. As the holidays come closer, if you are thinking about a gift for an IT pro, I’ve got two really good recommendations. These could even be great in-department gifts, a cool way to assign homework, if you know what I mean!

From my earlier recommendations, I still find myself going back to the vSphere 5 Clustering technical deepdive. Duncan Epping and Frank Denneman have really done the virtualization community a wonderful service with this book. The Amazon price for the title is around USD $25 and the Kindle version is available for USD $9.99. The Kindle value is amazing. If you don’t have a Kindle, you can actually install the Kindle app on most smartphones as well as your PC. It sounds crazy, but the Kindle app for the PC is actually quite nice.

Two good IT books

The vSphere 5 Clustering technical deepdive explores all aspects of VMware vSphere clustering. If you have any questions on the product, they will be answered with this book. This is especially valuable to explain the newly rewritten HA, the new Storage DRS, and the best explanation of how DRS recommendations are calculated.

Another book that I’d recommend is the newest book by Greg Schulz. Greg’s Cloud and Virtual Data Storage Networking is good because it applies many core logic principles to the new infrastructure that we live in. Greg has a background in storage, but it’s really about the entire infrastructure today. This book does an outstanding job of equipping the reader to be able to draw out all of the arrows for their entire infrastructure, with the new virtualization and cloud technologies in play; this task is very different than before. Greg’s book lists for around USD $69 on Amazon and as a Kindle for around USD $62.

Both of these books, as well as the summer recommendations are all sure bets for good gifts for your IT pro friends or co-workers. Do you have any book recommendations? Share your comments below.

About

Rick Vanover is a software strategy specialist for Veeam Software, based in Columbus, Ohio. Rick has years of IT experience and focuses on virtualization, Windows-based server administration, and system hardware.

5 comments
MastAvalons
MastAvalons

a good book, but there is no mention of virtualization applications (for example Boxedapp SDK)

BALTHOR
BALTHOR

Downloading isn't all that easy.Some might see it as an impossible concept to understand.Older software,especially some video animation and editing programs,seem to have been written back stage at the rock concert.The approach there is entirely different than the one we see now.You need to look at a lot of software to understand just the idea here.SynthMaker is way deep in engineering.You don't whip one out with the click of a button.To be able to backup,erase and restore gives you a freedom that you'd never have any other way.You keep going till she freezes up,then it's erase and restore.Right clicking might be impossible for some.Creating partitions,formatting or dual booting the same.It's an engineers toy.

BALTHOR
BALTHOR

Software controls the voltages and the frequencies in the computer.I could go alien on you but if it worked you'd use it.

BALTHOR
BALTHOR

I use VBox a lot to study ISO's that I've downloaded from share sites.I know that there appears to be some Virtualization stuff in the BIOS of the computer but it doesn't seem to make a difference in the operation of the virtual OS.To date it doesn't seem to me that all vhd files,as an example,have the same characteristics.Windows will make a vhd in it's image recovery system and VBox will make a vhd also.VMWare doesn't appear to be able to make a vhd.Microsoft's Virtual PC will not run vhd's.Some ISO files look like they were meant to start up in the BIOS or even the CPU.I wouldn't get too hung up on the current rules for operating a computer.It's going to be whatever somebody can get to work."It will never work" coming from a corporate software site might ruin them in the end.