Data Centers

Untangle appliance offers free QoS

The Untangle appliance offers many free services in its gateway product.One more feature is the QoS network application that adds to the compelling list of features that make up a strong solution for the SOHO.

The Untangle appliance offers many free services in its gateway product. One more feature is the QoS network application that adds to the compelling list of features that make up a strong solution for the SOHO.


QoS for the small office or home office (SOHO) does not need to be a wish list item any longer. I've mentioned the Untangle open source gateway on this blog before, and I keep finding good nuggets of functionality that make a strong case for the product. The Untangle's QoS feature is simple, yet effective. There are two main categores for the QoS management, the first being upload and download allowance. The second are port and host rules that can be carved out for specific systems and their applications. Figure A shows the main QoS configuration page on the Untangle gateway.

Figure A

Figure A

Within the QoS management page, a QoS rule can be added with ten or more rules that can be applied in successive criteria ("and"). For example, a QoS rule can be added to give a Web server priority. This example Web server runs ports 80 and 443 and exists as 10.187.187.106 on the internal network of the Untangle appliance. Because of the required conditional "and" requirement, I would make two rules for this Web server. One for the destination IP address over port 80, and one for the same IP address for port 443. Figure B shows the QoS rule created for port 80 for the Web server. Figure B

The QoS module is kept in the Web management interface rather than in the virtual rack java applet that features the Web filter, OpenVPN server, and other components. I have been using the Untangle gateway at home now for a few months and have been very happy with the appliance. I see this device as a great solution for small offices and an open source springboard for advanced applications. More information can be found on the Untangle Web site.

About

Rick Vanover is a software strategy specialist for Veeam Software, based in Columbus, Ohio. Rick has years of IT experience and focuses on virtualization, Windows-based server administration, and system hardware.

5 comments
b4real
b4real

One important note is that the QoS feature is only for traffic going through the gateway - LAN traffic isn't managed through this feature.

Michael Kassner
Michael Kassner

Interesting device Rick, Do other devices regulate QoS by remote IP addr as well? I'm not that familiar with this aspect and was curious to learn that information. I suspect that bandwidth throttling and QoS somewhat overlap in this regards.

hevymetl
hevymetl

Bandwidth throttling controls the amount of bandwidth a protocol or application can use, whereas QoS controls the priority of the packets. For instance, lets say your gateway device has bandwidth limits for HTTP set to 10kbps minimum and 500kbps maximum. and you have a full T1 with 1.5Mbps available. This means HTTP will be guaranteed at least 10 kbps when HTTP traffic is flowing. Now lets assume QoS is enabled and FTP traffic has a higher priority than HTTP. HTTP traffic will still be given a minimum of 10kbps reserved bandwidth, but if a FTP packet arrives it will be sent out of the gateway first, before any HTTP packets, no matter how much bandwidth was reserved for HTTP.

b4real
b4real

With the untangle appliance, source and destination addresses (and ports) can be configured. The main case here is VOIP. It isn't entirely as robust as traditional network components - but it is also free.

b4real
b4real

With the untangle appliance, source and destination addresses (and ports) can be configured. The main case here is VOIP. It isn't entirely as robust as traditional network components - but it is also free.