Wi-Fi

WiMAX Forum endorses new WiMAX lab at University of Maryland

The WiMAX Forum just announced the formation of a new WiMAX applications laboratory. Only the second one in the world, the MAXWell Lab is located on the University of Maryland campus.

WiMAX appears to be back on track. TechRepublic's executive editor Jason Hiner published some good news today in his post, "The new Clearwire: Mobile WiMAX in the US gets major cash infusion." It appears that Sprint and Clearwire are on the same page again and buoyed by major investments from Comcast and Google. This is good news for everyone concerned about WiMAX's future in the U.S. It looks like WiMAX may now have enough traction to become a viable broadband resource.

In more good news, the WiMAX Forum just announced the formation of a new WiMAX applications laboratory. Only the second one in the world, the MAXWell Lab is located on the University of Maryland campus. The first WiMAX applications lab is the M-Taiwan WiMAX Application lab located in Hsinchu, Taiwan. The WiMAX Forum endorsed the Hsinchu lab in October 2007.

The charter of both laboratories is to create an environment where WiMAX application developers can come and run real-world tests. The university community also satisfies the other WiMAX Forum requirement of being a vendor-neutral facility. In the University of Maryland news article "UM Gets Only U.S. Lab for WiMAX Next Generation Wireless Applications" Ashok Agrawala, director of MAXWell Lab mentions:

"This facility will support such testing extensively and the university is an excellent site for such testing. The first carrier deployment of WiMAX in the U.S. is by Sprint and the initial deployments are in Washington, DC area. With a university community of 50,000 people, the test bed at the MAXWell Lab will be available for testing WiMAX applications in a live environment with many users."

Final thoughts

I agree with Jason Hiner's assessment that moving WiMAX technology forward is a good thing, especially in the U.S. where WiMAX development was not keeping pace with the rest of the world.

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16 comments
MOREHEAD494MOR
MOREHEAD494MOR

WiMAX, the Worldwide Interoperability for Microwave Access, is a telecommunications technology that provides for the wireless transmission of data in a variety of ways, ranging from point-to-point links to full mobile cellular-type access. ========================================= Sam

MOREHEAD494MOR
MOREHEAD494MOR

WiMAX, the Worldwide Interoperability for Microwave Access, is a telecommunications technology that provides for the wireless transmission of data in a variety of ways, ranging from point-to-point links to full mobile cellular-type access. ========================================= Sam

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boevingr
boevingr

Seems that WiMax is moving in the right direction at last. Question is whether it has the legs to establish a broadband service that will compete effectively with cellular.

deepakd_fic
deepakd_fic

Hi all, I use Wimax internet connection at my home supplied by Reliance Communications in India. I hope the Wimax enabled mobile should come out in the market and i should be able to utilized my home a/c to my mobile and enjoy the speed of internet.

Michael_Knight
Michael_Knight

Knowing that WiMax or a technology like it will eventually Dominate the Market does this mean that we are looking at the end of Wired ISP Connections like Cable and Fiber (Like Verizon Fios) in the near future?

JCitizen
JCitizen

in France, as the government over there has allowed the public free gratis to form one of their own. It should be going along pretty well by now; as it was formed over a year ago,, I think.

seanferd
seanferd

Rather than something the average user has to learn about and configure for himself. Wait, what am I saying? That's a whole new market for IT professionals!

seanferd
seanferd

I've been given to understand that mesh networks are a bit of a security nightmare. Folks would really need to be up on the security of their connected devices. Perhaps M.Kassner might have something educational on this topic.

squirrelpie0
squirrelpie0

Living in an area where we only have access to Hi Speed through satellite or microwave towers (5 mi line of sight max- sometimes) and really improbable that fiber or DSL wires will ever make it to the door, it is the only real possibility of a cost effective high speed internet system. Currently we pay $50 to $60 minimum for "sort of" high speed service with no real competition whereas our urban neighbours or even rural where there is some competition get better for 1/2 ro 2/3 the price. Yes! Bring on the WIMAX!

JCitizen
JCitizen

What if the public adopts a MESH strategy in populated areas? They could use their own infrastructure and by pass WiMax or any other proprietary scheme. WiMax makes sense when considering the geographical spread here in the Americas; not a replacement for fiber, just a convenient method for tying far flung WIFI access areas together. If I have the concept of WiMax wrong, feel free to enlighten me.

compughter2000
compughter2000

We will have wired for quite a long time . With 10G Ethernet speeds and SM fiber having the capabilities that reach into the terabits, wireless will need the "zen" of all the "Matrix" to catch up. ;) However, I do expect WiMAX and LTE to play a huge factor in providing the mobility and "connected" world we are growing to expect. Watch out for 802.16m http://www.wireless-nets.com/blogger/2007/06/ieee-80216m-pushing-forward.html It will make the LTE vendor rethink their strategy and embrace WiMAX more.

Michael Kassner
Michael Kassner

Does the news about Clearwire and Sprint plus increased activity at the research level give WiMAX enough traction to compete with LTE?