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Demand for SQL and C# skills fuels UK job surge

The number of permanent IT jobs on the market in the UK in the first quarter of 2013 increased for the fourth year in a row.

Demand for SQL and C# is fuelling a surge in the number of permanent IT vacancies being offered in the UK, according to new figures.

The data from IT recruiter CW Jobs revealed that the total number of permanent IT job vacancies listed in the first quarter of 2013 has risen for the fourth consecutive year, to 95,279.

The total number of IT job vacancies on offer in the first quarter of 2013 are just 15 percent less than the pre-recession vacancies on offer in 2008, when a total of 132,863 jobs were listed. Three years ago, in 2010, the number of permanent IT job vacancies was down 41 percent on 2008 figures.

CW Jobs thinks it is likely that businesses are starting to take on additional staff in an effort to expand or trigger growth as the economic climate shows signs of becoming more stable.

Knowledge of SQL remains the most in demand skill for the fifth consecutive year, with 20,142 permanent IT positions advertised in the first quarter of this year, despite being 1,001 less positions than were offered over the same time period last year. Elsewhere, demand for C# has overtaken demand for C.

Demand for IT professionals remains highest in software houses and consultancies although finance and retail are also showing signs of steady growth. The only sector to experience a fall in the number of permanent IT roles was the public sector.

Richard Nott, website director, CWJobs, said in a statement: "As Britain's economic position stabilises, growth is being seen across most sectors of the IT industry, signalling that it is finally recovering from the recession. The technology industry looks to be at the forefront of Britain's growth, and if it maintains the same trajectory, could be boosting Britain's economic position even further."

About

Sam Shead is at his happiest with a new piece of technology in his hands or nailing down an exclusive story. In the past he's written for The Engineer and the Daily Mail, covering emerging technology in electronics, energy, defence, materials, aerosp...

1 comments
mla_ca520
mla_ca520

Do you think UK businesses might be open to remote hiring? I live in the US, have three kids and can't move to the UK, but I can write SQL that will work on UK databases!

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