Education investigate

Is it still worth studying computer science in the UK?

Is there a need for an influx of new IT talent when computer science graduates in the UK already have the highest unemployment rate among university leavers?

There was much rejoicing recently when the UK government decided to tear up the stupefyingly dull IT curriculum that had turned a generation off of a career in computing.

But just what prospects are there for a computer science graduate today? Dig a bit deeper and it seems that IT graduates in the UK - particularly those trying to pursue roles in software development - are struggling to get onto the career ladder.

Holders of computer science degrees were the graduates who were most likely to be unemployed in both 2009 and 2010, according to figures from the UK's Higher Education Statistics Agency. The figures, which measured unemployment rates among graduates six months after leaving university, showed the proportion of computer science graduates without work was about eight per cent higher than the national average in 2009 and five per cent higher than the national average for graduates in 2010.

One reason for computer science graduates struggling to find a role within their chosen career is that there are simply not enough entry-level roles within the UK, according to Richard Holway, chairman of analyst house TechMarketView. This lack of graduate positions stem from the longstanding practice of companies filling entry-level IT roles offshore, Holway, said.

"For the last 10 years the number of entry level jobs created in the UK have plummeted," he said.

In a bid to stay competitive the major western outsourcing companies have also created their own networks of offshore development centres.

But without these starter roles, Holway said, comp-sci grads find themselves unable to get a foothold in their chosen career and unable to progress to senior positions that require professional experience.

"Qualified network designers do not come fully formed out of the womb, you do have to give them their first jobs," he said.

Adam Thilthorpe, director of professionalism at the technology industry body BCS – The Chartered Institute for IT, acknowledged that the practice of offshoring junior tech roles had made it more difficult for IT graduates to gain experience early on in their career.

"That does put a particular pressure on people to be able to pick up those first two years-worth of experience," he said.

Thilthorpe said that people at the start of their IT careers could gain experience through graduate development schemes run by major tech firms operating in the UK, but admitted that these too are over-subscribed.

"There are still some excellent graduate schemes that exist in technical roles, but competition to get onto those grad schemes is quite fierce," he said.

However offshoring is not the sole cause of companies unwillingness to hire UK IT graduates: another major factor is UK businesses dissatisfaction with what computer science graduates are being taught, both in schools and university.

Last year employers told tech skills body e-Skills UK that IT graduates didn't have the mix of technical skills and business knowledge they are looking for. An e-skills UK report found this lack of the right skills had resulted in a steady drop-off in the proportion of IT professionals aged under 30 - falling from 33 per cent in 2001 to only 19 per cent in 2010 - as employers favoured experienced workers from other sectors over young recruits.

Holway said that Gove's technology teaching reform will need to extend beyond secondary education, the edge of its existing remit, and tackle university tuition if it is going to address employer's issues with the way IT is taught.

"Many employers believe that what people learn about IT at university and at school is basically useless," said Holway. "This is a very fast changing world, you can learn all sorts of things about programming mainframes and data manipulation, but nowadays the vast majority of skills that are required are in things like app development, network design, social media skills and how they operate in the cloud.

"They are not part of a computer science degree course."

However, there are some indications that the number of entry level roles for computer science and IT graduates are increasing. A recent study by High Fliers Research predicted that, despite a slump in graduate recruitment by IT and telecoms companies in 2008 and 2009, the IT and telecoms sector will see the fastest growth in numbers of entry-level positions between 2007 and 2012, with the number of posts expected to grow 45 per cent during the period.

And even if IT graduates don't find work within dedicated tech roles, Britain's workforce needs a sound grounding in IT, the BCS' Thilthorpe said, if UK businesses are to exploit the opportunities that technological innovation will bring.

"I think there is a need for technology graduates because of the importance of them to UK Plc. We are a relatively small island off the coast of Europe, we don't have natural resources or even a huge manufacturing base any more to generate wealth. What we do to maintain our position as the fifth largest economy in the world is about knowledge services and innovation, and that is underpinned by technology and IT. There isn't an sector in the UK who's success isn't based on its ability to innovate in the ICT space - from retail to financial services to the public sector - so we need the best and most talented people coming through and thinking this is a great area to work in because it's so diverse and dynamic."

About

Nick Heath is chief reporter for TechRepublic UK. He writes about the technology that IT-decision makers need to know about, and the latest happenings in the European tech scene.

10 comments
johncav
johncav

The Information Technology Management for Business degree which is developed by the government e-skills UK and in collaboration with a whole host of major blue chip companies already has a curriculum which identifies the needs of businesses! There is an employers strategy forum that sits down with the universities and specifies exactly what it is they require from graduates! Which in actual fact, is not Computer Scientists! CS graduates may have the technical know-how but they do not have the business and softer skills required to support a business. The ITMB degree does just this, combines the business, technology, management, and personal skills required by businesses . Graduates of this degree are said to be ready for senior level careers in IT. The degree does have a technical element to it, but it looks at it from a business perspective which is surely more valuable to the employer? Having studied the GCSE and A level in IT I can confirm that they are pretty much useless and need revamping - but in line with what employers ask for like ITMB, not by what tick boxs the government what checking. That way, students can get a better understanding of what is required of them from a young age, can hopefully go into higher education onto degrees like ITMB, and we will have fit for purpose, ready for work graduates that can ultimately add value!

john.a.wills
john.a.wills

"the stupefyingly dull IT curriculum that had turned a generation off of a career in computing" Did someone in the UK really write "off of" where he meant merely "off"?

Professor8
Professor8

I get the impression that the author doesn't understand CS curricula vs. vo-tech training. As the OP said, vo-tech is aimed at developing competent users; so they tend to be very specific, applying only to the current versions of the specific kinds of apps and operating systems covered. CS classes cover the whys and wherefores and hows. It does not become obsolete in a couple years or in a couple decades. (Maybe after 4 decades, if the person were kept in isolation, not provided any reference manuals, on-line docs, other operating systems and versions, etc., they might.) Both the new grads and experienced pros in countries with high standards of living are being squeezed. In the end it's all dust being thrown in our faces by executives who want cheap, pliant labor with flexible ethics, and people from the 3rd world trying to get out.

n.gurr
n.gurr

"....about programming mainframes and data manipulation, but nowadays the vast majority of skills that are required are in things like app development, network design, social media skills and how they operate in the cloud." As I work providing IT services to, among others, Computer Science students in an old (1994 group) university I can say that Holway speaks out of where he sits. There is a specific focus on both app development and network design at the moment during our courses. We have a lot to do with some major players in the IT industry and often have graduates go to these companies on graduation so we cannot be too out of touch! For the record we do not have a mainframe and some data skills are handy - ask anyone with data handling as a part of their degree, although we do not teach Excel perhaps that is what he is referring to? All in all his comments about Comp-sci are ill judged and even more ill informed - he is obviously chasing a sensationalist title. Perhaps a tax on outsourced products would be better - 50p per phone call in or out charged to the company that is benefiting from the reductions would help protect UK jobs, especially at the entry level? It seems that the customer loses out as a tax payer and often (not - always) gets worse service on poor quality phone lines to poorly trained staff who often have heavy accents. Sorry if this reads as a rant but I hate ill informed journalistic output such as this effecting students struggling to get an education and pay for it.

neil.postlethwaite
neil.postlethwaite

Yes, because non-graduates lack the discipl;ine and rigor of a university educsation. If you can't get a job, and your such a sh1t hot IT graduatem, try becoming an App developer to cut your teeth.

JJMach
JJMach

Quoting the article: [q]"There was much rejoicing recently when [b][i]the UK government[/b][/i] decided to tear up the stupefyingly dull IT curriculum that had turned a generation off of a career in computing.[/q] ([i]emphasis mine[/i]) In the immortal words of an old auto mechanic: "Well there's your problem right there!" Why aren't universities working directly with companies to come up with a curriculum that will give their graduates the skills companies are looking for and use their post-graduate hiring rates as a way of attracting students?

n.gurr
n.gurr

Do work with companies, after all the decent ones get most of their funding from private sources (90% for the one I work at.) Companies do not pay us millions for worthless research. This relationship also crosses to our students who are offered the opportunity and encouraged to go on placement and a year out with both major and minor companies providing IT functions. The government are not very involved with either research (there is some minor funding) or course content, beyond some verification of the quality of the stuff being taught.

DaveWoodman
DaveWoodman

The curriculum mentioned is for the compulsory ICT teaching is schools - not universities. This teaching has, until now, been targeted to making pupils computer literate users rather than teaching them coding.