CXO

Windows 7 change is good for businesses but may be more bad news for Windows 8

While members of TechRepublic's CIO Jury are pleased about Microsoft's plans for Windows 7, that's largely because they remain underwhelmed by Windows 8.
Earlier this month Microsoft confirmed it will continue to allow PC makers to sell new PCs with Windows 7 Professional preinstalled beyond October 2014 - the company's original cut-off date.

Microsoft said the decision to extend was not related to the looming end-of-support date for Windows XP – or to take up of Windows 8.

The company said that because Windows 7 is the largest part of Microsoft's installed base it wants to make sure it remains easy for businesses to obtain it, and its end of support dates for Windows 7 remain the same.

And when asked "Was Microsoft right to extend the availability of Windows 7 for business customers?," TechRepublic's panel of international business decisions makers responded yes unanimously  – but their enthusiasm for Windows 7 seems to be linked to their lack of love for Windows 8.

Many tech chiefs praised the move – as Brad Novak, IT director at Goettsch Partners, noted "it allows us to keep a very stable OS a little longer", while Florentin Albu CIO at the UN's Food and Agriculture Organisation ,said creating an artificial deadline to force businesses to change desktop platforms has always been met with resistance, and added "Microsoft is just anticipating the response".

Meanwhile David Wilson, IT manager at VectorCSP, said businesses need a stable, workable platform: "Windows 8 still has bugs that cost time and frustration, and the interface is still too new to force-feed to industry. Microsoft would be well-served to leave Windows 7 Professional in production and open for support for the foreseeable future."

Similarly Jeff Focke, director of IT at Electrical Distributors, said that Windows 7 is still an integral and stable platform and there is no compelling business reason to need to upgrade to Windows 8, and noted: "I would rather focus time and resources on other challenges than a Windows upgrade project."

Some took a stronger line; Ingo Dean, IT director of EastWest Institute, said "Windows 8 is not ready.  Allowing us to continue to get Windows 7 alleviates our need to seek alternatives such as MacBooks or Chromebooks."

And Gavin Whatrup, group IT director at Creston, said: "There is no, or little value to the majority of businesses in deploying Windows 8 Pro, unless they need to be seen to be using the latest technology all the time. Or unless they need to utilise some of the more advanced features of Windows Server 2012 or other server products in the same wave."

He said that while Windows 7 Pro is -  as with XP Pro before it  - a stable, known and well-supported OS with significant support systems and processes behind it, "Windows 8 is a different beast without a compelling reason, or resources, to move to it."

Microsoft's change in policy is more aimed at smaller businesses that don't have enterprise agreements, as Dale Huhtala, executive director, Enterprise Technology Infrastructure Services at Service Alberta, observed. "Most enterprises use their own images anyway so whatever the desktops/laptops come preloaded with is irrelevant. We format the drive and install our own custom image. As long as we are licensed for Windows 7 and 8, these changes have no effect on large enterprises."

John Gracyalny, VP for IT at SafeAmerica Credit Union, made a similar point: "Extending the availability of Windows 7 Pro is likely good for small businesses. I would think larger shops like mine have been running Windows 7 Enterprise under a separate licensing agreement, and will continue to do so, regardless of what version new hardware is shipped with.

Other tech chiefs made their voices heard too. Tim Stiles, CIO at the Bremerton Housing Authority, warned: "Acceptance of Windows 8 may never occur within the business community", while Brian Wells, associate CIO at Penn Medicine, said: "Many third party application vendors do not support Windows 8 or its associated browser".

Other tech chiefs reported similar impressions of Windows 8. Ian Auger, head of IT and communications at UK news company ITN, said: "I think Windows 8 is still a step too far for most businesses. Windows 8 tries to cater for both touchscreen devices and traditional desktops but still comes up short for the latter."

Matthew Oakley, group head of IT at Schroders, said "This recognises, I think, that Windows 8 is not a really a business-ready platform and perhaps sets the scene for Windows 9 to be the main business migration."

However, not all agree: Juergen Renfer, CIO at German insurance organisation at Kommunale Unfallversicherung Bayern said "Windows 8 is the better Windows 7, as far as Microsoft does accept that users want to decide the GUI-style: old style (Windows 7 style) for PCs, new style (Windows 8 style) for mobile devices, e.g. tablets and smartphones. So Microsoft could be able to offer the only OS that is able to support all kinds of devices."

This week's CIO Jury was:

  • Kevin Quealy, director of Information Services and Mapping Center, Southern Baptist Conservatives of Virginia
  • Joel Robertson, director of IT, King College
  • David Wilson, IT manager at VectorCSP
  • Gavin Whatrup, group IT director at Creston
  • Shawn P Beighle, CIO, International Republican Institute
  • Brad Novak, IT director, Goettsch Partners
  • Ingo Dean, IT director of EastWest Institute
  • John Gracyalny, VP for IT at SafeAmerica Credit Union
  • Michael Hanken, VP of IT for Multiquip
  • Tim Stiles, CIO, Bremerton Housing Authority
  • Florentin Albu, CIO, Food and Agriculture Organisation of the United Nations
  • Brian Wells, associate CIO, Penn Medicine
Related stories
What the Windows 7 Pro sales lifecycle changes mean to consumers and business buyers
Microsoft extends date for OEM preloads of Windows 7 for business users

Want to be part of TechRepublic's CIO Jury and have your say on the hot issues for IT decision-makers? If you are a CIO, CTO, IT director or equivalent at a large or small company, working in the private sector or in government, and you want to join TechRepublic's CIO Jury pool, or you know an IT chief who should, then get in contact. Either click the Contact link below or email me, steve dot ranger at techrepublic dot com, and send your name, title, company, location, and email address.

About

Steve Ranger is the UK editor of TechRepublic, and has been writing about the impact of technology on people, business and culture for more than a decade. Before joining TechRepublic he was the editor of silicon.com.

72 comments
JazzySnazzy
JazzySnazzy

I dont think most of you have a clue TBH.

remmeler
remmeler

People talk about compatibility issues.  I have had no compatibility issues when moving from XP to Windows 8.  I already had all those same programs running on Windows 7.  

I am not just talking about run of the mill program. I am talking about video editing and conversion programs and a large amount of diverse programs.  I ran the M/S program that tested my system and all my drivers and programs, which was much better than previous ones that M/S put out.


The only problem I had was with an old Brother Multi-function Laser printer.  They had a driver for everything except the scanner, so I still have to use the Windows 7 for scanning.

jonnyddd
jonnyddd

Windows 8 look the way it does because MS panicked about mobile phones.  What they totally failed to realise was that the PC/laptop whatever is a WORK PRODUCTIVITY AID for over a billion people.  These billion people just want their WORK PRODUCTIVITY AID to get better.  Phones are just getting out of the Darwinian swamp stage, and MS should not bet their crown jewels on that.  They should be looking after these work users who want an ever improving productivity aid and developing their offering to improve user productivity.  Instead they TAKE AWAY the only worthwhile aid that came with W7: the search facility under the Windows key - one of the biggest, yet simplest, productivity aids that came with W7. (It allows one to find information so well).  If they had brains and an eye for the future they would have improved this (e.g. made it run Bing on the computer's contents, or even do searches on more than one token).  Also, they should do some real work to integrate files/folders with email folders and favourites.  A one level information store is LONG LONG overdue.  It should move to being web based because the web (guess what) is here to stay!  Instead all they do is paint the window frames a different colour.  Now Ballmer is gone, get some brains going and give WORKERS something worthwhile and better.  MS has some great applications in Office, it just needs to capitalise on them by sitting them on an operating system that's improving in worthwhile ways.

remmeler
remmeler

I can understand the lack of enthusiasm for Windows 8.  What people don't understand that it is easy for any enterprise to use it like a slightly improved Windows 7 system.


I do, I run a Window 7 system side by side with a Window 8 system that never leaves Desktop.  It can easily done with the change of a few defaults.  That can be then standardized and used as the disk to bring up all systems.  That is the way enterprise does installations, not one at a time.


If they have to have the exact same start menu, then Classic Shell can give them either a XP or Windows 7 start menu.  Classic Shell was introduced because people hated the Vista/Windows 7 start menu.  The same one that people don't want to give up today.

mbundy
mbundy

I am a PC user since their inception,  an intelligent person with an IT degree and an MBA. I am busy doing REAL WORK. I do not have hours on end to play with computers just for the fun of it. I do not have time to constantly relearn operating systems and Office software for very little benefit. If MS would just continue to make the OS faster and get rid of the bugs and quit screwing with interfaces I would be happy. I would even pay more!

Troy.smith
Troy.smith

I'm an administrator of many complex systems, Microsoft an non-Microsoft alike.  I run Win 8 at home, and 4 months ago moved to Win 8 at work.  what I learned was, while consumer solutions have moved ahead, many enterprise solutions have not.  Most of my day to day work is now done on a Win 7 VM running on my Win 8 laptop, so what was the point of upgrading?  programs either flat out don't support running on Win 8, or they are so buggy that it's not feasible.  Some of these are even Microsoft products, albeit slightly older versions, but who has time t keep EVERY system running the latest version.  I will be downgrading my laptop at the first available opportunity.

pgm554
pgm554

Talk about legacy ,Frys Electronics still uses a Novell based POS app.


Folks don't seem to understand that unless there is a truly compelling reason to upgrade other than a new screensaver .

Given the amount of bugs and incompatibilities , going to a new platform brings is a major PITA.

laneeugene
laneeugene

I am so sick of the na sayers of Windows 8. Where would we be if the na sayers of XP had won the battle. It is a great  OS had only on problem, The Button, It is correctable by only a few mouse clicks and I believe Bill has stepped in to correct this with the next update. Windows 9 will give you the option to disable the tiles. Stop the madness and move on. 8 is here to stay 9 will improve on it,  can't wait to see what 10 will bring. A talking computer that responds to to commands. Beam me up Scotty.

jyrkia
jyrkia

" it wants to make sure it remains easy for businesses to obtain it,"

Well.. I think this has most value to home users. Almost all business environments use their own OS images with preinstalled programs that they will load to all computers they take in use.

ottowj
ottowj

Many K-12 educational institutions have one foot in the MS world, another foot in the Google/Chrome world.  Chrome gives us things we could only dream of with MS with a price point that  is a fraction of the MS world. (i.e. 8 second boot up, never waiting for updates, organically sharing docs.)


I will clearly admit that it is not ready for the business world yet but it will be soon enough.  Do yourself a favor and invest $200 in a Chromebook and dive in.  If you only stick your toe in the Chrome world, you will not be impressed. 


Like a previously posted comment. Windows 8 is one more reason that MS is giving us to look to other platforms.

TSE-m
TSE-m

What about Office?  Office 2013 (and 365) have issues as well!  Those issues, including bugs and the ugly Win8 theme, are keeping our national company away as well. Sorry, Microsoft, you've again gone too far, and in the wrong direction.

johnmn
johnmn

For any reason, I still prefer to use Window 7 for my PCs and Lap. There are someone still using DOS based software for my CRM system on XP. However, it not really make sense.

wdavok
wdavok

Windows 3.1 was better than Windows 8 that says all.

PaulNN18
PaulNN18

Hi everyone. I still use DOS based software for my CRM system on XP. I am an OMB. I have around £10,000 worth of legally acquired software over the last 25 years - and I know how to use it too. Although I have manuals for how it works, I seldom have to use them.


So where do I go? Can someone tell me whether this XP mode emulator in Windows 7 will itself give me 3 concurrent VDM windows to run my DOS programs on like I do now - or is the best advice trash the last 25 years and start again?


This XPerience of Microstoft promising DOS users like me "support for evermore" is an ongoing nightmare! This is like having a car parked outside which one uses for not only doing the local shopping but also doing a regular drive a couple of hundred miles.... Someone greased down with a diamond white smile turns up to tell me that my car is "old - old style" - what I need to make my life easier and do those 200 mile journeys is a mini helicopter. To encourage me to use it, they won't sell me petrol (gasolene) for my car anymore to encourage me to use the helicopter "it'll be great". The problem is, folks, I know how to drive the car - I don't know how to fly the helicopter and I don't want to have to learn and I don't want all its bells and whstles. Replacing the car with a helicopter isn't giving me more freedom - it's actually stopping me from working and taking away my liberty - Whilst the helicopter mifht do so many more things than the car ever could, it can't do everything the car actually did.


Microsoft. Please put a proper, proper correctly funtioning DOS emulator in Windows 7 or 8 so that I can use the DOS programs I understand how to operate and do the job. This is not funny.

And if they don't can someone recommend a fix with Linux / Unix or some other OS. Before anyone says "Dosbox", friends, Dosbox has 2 floors. It doesn't support SHARE properly - and I can't cut and past from the window the program is running from - CRUCIAL to me using my CRM!

ben_myers
ben_myers

Well, this is not something ginned up by the Gartner Group for Microsoft, so the article here belabors the obvious.  It was sheer fantasy to think that marrying together the old Windows XP/7 desktop, albeit somewhat crippled, with a touch interface for use on computers without touchscreens could possibly succeed.

lwood
lwood

You know, everything I have read here is the same thing we heard when Windows 7 was offered up.  People did not want to leave XP because Windows 7 was not ready for enterprise environment.  I my primary day to day business system is a Windows 8.1 pro system and to date is has not had a BSOD and I have had operational for over 2yrs.  I like Windows 8 because it has been coded to be a much lighter OS running on system Windows 7 could never run. Let's focus on where our business it headed.  It is getting smaller not bigger. 

GBowes54
GBowes54

OK, I’m the odd ball here. I like Windows 8, it’s a good solid O/S, which has yet to give me a BSOD. However, I only use it on a virtual machine, on my Windows 7 Ultimate desk top. I need it to support a couple of my clients who have made the leap to it.

In reality, most of my clients still use XP, & Windows 7, and to be totally honest, so do I. While I support all flavours of Windows 7, those clients that I am able to drag, kicking & screaming, from XP to Windows 7, I always sell them Pro, or above. The reason is simple, even if they have a mission critical application, which will “ONLY” run under XP, with Pro & above I can install the FREE XP Mode from Microsoft.

That’s something that’s just not offered in Windows 8. So no, I can’t really call Windows 8 a business O/S. I suppose if you were just starting out, and had no legacy software, you could use it, as my Windows 8 clients do. However, the vast majority of us Windows users come with baggage of some sort. In the form of applications, and there associated data files. We need backwards compatibility, until our applications can catch up with Windows 8, or 9.

The extension of the sales window for Windows 7 Pro is good for me, and my clients. Until Microsoft pulls their heads out of their asses, and produces a business version of Windows, whatever they call it, business sales are going to languish. As a tech support I can wait, and continue to make a nice living out of servicing my Windows XP, & 7 clients. However, as a stock holder, I would like to see Microsoft pull a rabbit out of their hat.

freddygains
freddygains

Unbelievable the so called IT professionals who are selling Windows 7 downgrades over a UI that is easily customizable to fit all user needs. $0 for a Windows 7 style start menu, $0 to set the system to boot to desktop and $0 to set all default programs as desktop programs which will completely keep users out of the modern UI. The Windows 8 user experience can be identical to Windows 7, at no extra cost and about 5 minutes of configuration.

You're selling people a 5 year old system that has a support cycle scheduled to end in 6 years, 3 years earlier than 8.1. You are deciding for companies that over the next 6 years, they will have no use for modern, light weight and low cost mobile applications. Windows 8 is faster, less resource intensive, a smaller footprint and more secure than 7.


There are a number of Desktop improvements like the File Explorer, Task Manager, integrated cloud storage with OneDrive, cloud backup of pc settings, app settings and browser settings and my favorite from a management perspective is the customizable PC refresh/reset capabilities. It's just a better OS.


I understand the criticism of the UI. I have had customers who had legitimate gripes with it and sometimes it was just too big a departure from their way of doing things and that's ok. But I have had others do very well with the new UI and who have leveraged the modern apps to boost efficiency. One customer for example had to show me how much quicker his telemarketing staff was at entering in customer contact info with the People app then they were on Outlook.


There is no real benefit to downgrading an 8 machine or selling a 7 machine. The customer has a smaller window of support, a less capable OS and will be left out of any benefits that may come in the near future as modern applications advance in their abilities AND they're paying MORE! Seems silly to me and a waste of time and money.

Rydude
Rydude

My client even showed me the new laptops he had to replace as the right side Ctrl, direction and enter keys were broken. . . hmmm in the shape of a fist perhaps?

itboss
itboss

Rydude

you are so right about loss of productivity

my company would have crashed if our new computers had been allowed in the door with Windows 8

I have had Windows 7 images made for our new PCs / Laptops and now have any new machine imaged to Windows 7 before it is allowed to be connected to our network servers

it cost a bit but better that the company folding with the loss of so many jobs

Microsoft have lost their way  

Rydude
Rydude

I have a small computer consultancy - like a Swiss Army Knife we do a little bit of everything. 

I like W8 because it makes me money.  I have retrograded at least 3 machines a week since the release of Windows 8.  I have turned back all and I mean all of my friends new computers, even those with touch screens to Win 7.  All of the custom built machines I have made since maybe 2 weeks after W8's release have been W7s and this has not been my choice but the clients.  The 8.1 patch makes little difference. BTW W7 on W8 hardware is stable and has NO discernible impact on performance. HUGE impact on usability.  

The cost of "LOST PRODUCTIVITY" for one of my larger clients (200 seats) was so high that one month after he had (without me) installed all the "New W8 Machines" in the office he told me he wished he had the old ones back.  Over the next weekend I retrograded these machines to W7.  The client was overjoyed and said that not since the MS Office drastic change to the Ribbon had he experienced such a loss of productivity. 


I am glad that I can still get W7

itboss
itboss

er    you don't "have to use it "    

just walk away

as I will with my entire company and IT budget if they can't come up with a proper user oriented replecement to Windows 7 in due course

happydaes
happydaes

Come on! Win 8 is not user friendly, just ask any tech, people have to learn how to use it because of all the - can't get there from here problems. Win 7 just works! no problem.

itboss
itboss

I am the IT Director of a Medium sized company in the UK

I have grown our network systems from a standing start 16 years ago to the current multi-server business wide PC/Laptop deployment.

 I & my IT Techs spent nearly a week evaluating a test machine - rubbish - totally hopeless for a networked business environment.There is NO way I would ever authorise the purchase of any Windows 8 machines at all, ever -

Windows 7 has a shelf-life til 2020 - we will stay with Windows 7 til then and if Microsoft can't supply what business users need I will simply go to other operating systems

Microsoft have lost their way

rifhickman
rifhickman

No one 'Uses' windows 8, they use applications that run on their platform. I run windows 8 but use applications that run on everything back to XP.


Microsoft should realise, like Apple did when Supercalc came out, that it is the Apps that drive the OS, not the users.

edewey
edewey

@jonnyddd  Well put.  Well said.  Excellent points on improving it!

tkuwait
tkuwait

@mbundy Me and you both buddy--but these idiots think there is no money in this route and unfortunately they may be right!

Alfred_E
Alfred_E

@Troy.smith changing from Win8 to Win7 is NOT downgrading. :) Having suffered through the Vista debacle, I dreaded having to shop for a new laptop in December, but fortunately XP was still offering computers w/ Win7. I am delighted w/ my new 4400S and its Win7 OS.

Alfred_E
Alfred_E

@pgm554 Spot-on. If it ain't broke, don't try to fix it. All of my students w/ Win8 laptops have to run Xilinx and MathWorks tools in hobbled 32-bit mode on their brand new 64-bit computers. I'll keep Win7 at least until Win9 comes out and addresses Win8/8.1's dreadful application compatibility issues. Vista all over again -- when will they ever learn?


I keep wondering whether MSFT deliberately issues a not-ready-for-prime time OS on every alternate attempt, following it by a stable OS which fixes its glaring defects. Win7 is simply what Vista should have been, but wasn't.

tkuwait
tkuwait

@laneeugene  Not everyone needs or wants the latest techi crap--they just want a system that works and doesn't take months to figure out!  Perhaps you have time on your hands and money burning a hole in your wallet, but most people don't.

Alfred_E
Alfred_E

@laneeugene Xilinx and MathWorks do not support Win8. This is the Vista boondoggle all over again.

edewey
edewey

@PaulNN18  You can also check out Virtual Box and run an XP vm in it.  Works quite well.

PC Ferret
PC Ferret

@PaulNN18   If I were you, I'd check out VMWARE WorkStation and see if it will handle MS-DOS. It's quite cost-effective and certainly handles Most Windows and Linux distros.

JoCaBa
JoCaBa

@lwood No - it just seems like 2 years. Bad times drag on, and good times race by.

Windows 8 wasn't released until 26 Oct 2012, so at the most you've been using it for 16 months, and 8.1 was only released on 17 Oct 2013 - a mere 4 months ago.

Oh, and it wasn't Windows 7 that had the bad reception, it was Windows Vista. People did not want to leave XP because Windows Vista was not ready for enterprise environment. Windows 7 came as a great relief to most people who thought Microsoft had lost their way

Claude Balloune
Claude Balloune

@GBowes54 Could you explain to me, when I wish to run an app in Windows-8, and I right-click on its icon and go to "properties" then to "compatibility", there is a list - 

Windows 7 

Windows Vista

Windows Vista SP1

Windows Vista SP2 

Windows Vista

Windows XP SP2

Windows XP SP1

Windows ME / Windows98

Windows 95 

(Sorry for the double-spacing- this is a fault of Techrepublic's website, not me. Were it me, I'd fix it forthwith) 

But why are all the above ops in the Win-8 context menu? Is this just a pile of BS done by MS?  

Or- More likely, you do not know about this. 

Or- Perhaps you are running XP (pre-SP1) ?  Then good luck, troglodyte.

Or, even more likely you're a techie of the mould set by the most excellent "ITBOSS" below? Perhaps you could qualify as one of his techies! A high-techjob may be waiting for you in his very progressive "medium sized UK company"


Alfred_E
Alfred_E

@freddygains I can run Xilinx and MathWorks tools in 64-bit mode on Win7, but have to hobble them to 32-bit mode to run under Win8.1. (They don't even work under Win8.) I met w/ the regional Xilinx FAE, who confirmed that Xilinx has no plans to port to Win8. I like Win7 and plan to stick with it for now, at home, in my consulting practice, and in my university teaching.

Claude Balloune
Claude Balloune

@freddygains Yup.  All troglodytes.  I bet when XP came out they whined "Whats wrong with Win2K?"

And when Win-7 came out they whined "What's wrong with XP?  (this latter group are now being looked at suspiciously by the CIO)

Ah well, perhaps they'll have an upgrade path to Win-7 mapped out by 2019. Or more likely they will be working somewhere else (if lucky).

billfranke
billfranke

@freddygains  

Although most of the good things you say about Win8 are true, the line "The Windows 8 user experience can be identical to Windows 7,..." is patently false. Win 8 doesn't natively run all the programs that I use on Win7. And no matter how much lipstick I'm now allowed to put on that little pig, it's still a pig that wants to force me to upgrade to Office 2007 or above when I have no desire or need to say goodbye to Office 2003.


I don't like change for the sake of change and I don't like being told by programmers and developers that the ribbon is easier because it's more logical than the old drop-down menu interface. And the Charms just aren't charming enough, IMHO. I have that old GUI burned into my brain after having used it every day for so many years.


There's no need to fix what isn't broken, unless the point is to squeeze even more bloody lucre out of users. But that's one of the major points of big business: create a captive audience and then do what's best for the stockholders and executives, not for the customers/users, who can have Windows in whatever color they like, as long as it's black.

AdminBones
AdminBones

@freddygains Yes 5 minutes of configuration that was not available until the release of 8.1 and even then windows 8 has fundamental flaws when it comes to 3rd party application support.


Also please bear in mind that any half way experienced IT administrator will vouch that it is a hell of a lot easier to let the user continue to use what they are used to rather then having to spend 30 minutes to 4 hours on a per user basis to sit there and train them how to use the new "modern and easy to use" system. 

If you sit there and do the math for a a medium to large scale company to retrain their staff to use a new "upgraded" operating system @ 25-250+ users X an average of 3+ hours support per user based off of basic trouble shooting and training needs you are looking at Hundreds upon hundreds of wasted hours of productivity.  That does not include the wasted time by the user on their own trying to remember where things are or how to get to their files.


Most companies would rather sacrifice the "modern updated OS" to continue to be productive.


I am just saying from a Network Admin's perspective the:

Extended support date of
January 14, 2020 

And 

Undetermined end of production date for windows 7 pro is good news. 

Claude Balloune
Claude Balloune

@itboss Mmm, yes, "IT Boss" -

"Rubbish". "Totally hopeless"  NO WAY huh? At all. Ever! That's the attitude.  I love a boss that shows some backbone!  We (the western world) need more fellows like you and your IT "Techs"!

Say, since Microsoft have lost their way, impress the CEO! Make an executive decision and go to Linux!  Or even better- Macintosh!

radar_z
radar_z

@tkuwait @mbundySubscription service will provide an ongoing revenue stream for MS, and the price isn't bad if you have Office which can be put on 5 PCs.

donw1234
donw1234

@tkuwait @mbundy  Unfortunately for Microsoft there is even less money if they chase people away from Windows, or more likely, just stop upgrading windows..


It seems they saw the widespread use of tablets and phones with touch screen and they thought that they had to offer a touch screen product.  


Perhaps they were correct about that.  


What they were not correct about is trying to force it down the throats of all Windows users.


If they are smart, which is not a certainty, Windows 9 will go back to the desktop metaphor with the touchscreen/Metro interface an option if users want it.


I believe a strong motivation for pushing the Metro interface is that Metro apps have to be purchased through the Microsoft app store and Microsoft gets 30% of the sales price.


gechurch
gechurch

@Claude Balloune

When GBowes54 talks about backwards compatibility, he is referring to using XP Mode. The compatibility mode settings you are talking about will get around some of the more basic incompatibilities, it is very different from actually running the older OS.


XP Mode is a Windows XP VM that you get to use for free if you own Windows 7 Pro. As it is genuine XP, any software that runs on XP will work on a Windows 7 Pro computer under XP Mode (well, providing the software can run virtualised).

blarman
blarman

@billfranke Straight up.  As a Windows Admin of 20+ years, I agree 100%.  Newer != Better.

freddygains
freddygains

@billfranke My statement is not "patently false" because YOU can't run every program you use. That's a silly comment. It's true that Windows 8 won't run every app that 7 can run, the same can be said for 7 running apps designed for previous versions of Windows, yet you advocate 7 for everyone else because it runs the apps you use? Either way, either way you're wrong

As for the rest of your comment, you demonstrate pretty clearly that you are not a fan of some of the design elements found in Microsoft products. You seem eager to voice your displeasure with the new Windows UI I'm glad you were able to get that off your chest. I don't see what any of it has to do with my original comment. Or maybe you just went off topic for fun?

ben_myers
ben_myers

@AdminBones @freddygains Even before the debut of Windows 8.1, it was possible to customize Windows 8 and bring back the start button.  ClassicShell does the trick, and I have a number of grateful clients who like it way better than unadorned tiled Windows 8.  But whether it is IT doing it for hundreds or thousands of users or me doing it on a one-off basis, it takes time to do.

freddygains
freddygains

@AdminBones  My point is simply this; if a company has made a purchase of Windows 8 machines and turned to my company looking to downgrade their machines, I would advise they keep 8 and hire us to configure 8 to operate the way 7 does. I would inform them that they will save $165 in software + services per machine.

They would have the latest OS with a host of desktop improvements with no change in user experience for hundreds or thousands less depending on the number of machines. I don't understand how people argue the opposite


donw1234
donw1234

@ben_myers @AdminBones @freddygains


It seems that the only people that argue for the use of Windows 8 are those that work for Microsoft or that have an add on product that will bring back some of the Windows 7 features to Windows 8.

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