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Five easy to use secure shell clients

Jack Wallen lists what he considers to be five of the best SSH-ready clients for Windows and UNIX.

Every IT admin I know depends upon a secure shell at some point. It's the single best way to remotely administer a Linux or UNIX-based server. Secure shell allows you shell access to your servers, without the concern for transmitting plain-text passwords. Of course, shell access isn't limited to UNIX-like servers. Even Windows machines can run a secure shell server.

But what about gaining access to those secure shell-enabled servers? What is the best method? Well, that all depends - do you like the command line, or do you like a nice GUI tool? The good news, you can have them both. In fact, I have found five of the best SSH-ready clients. All of these clients are free and very easy to use. You'll find clients for both Windows and Linux.

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Five Apps

1. PuTTY

PuTTY is probably the single most popular secure shell client for the Windows platform. It's incredibly easy to use, allows for the saving of profiles, and can be used as a portable tool. PuTTY is not only free, but open source. PuTTY can also do telnet, rlogin, and raw TCP. PuTTY has built in support for the secure copy (scp) program.

2. SecPanel

SecPanel is a solid GUI secure shell tool for UNIX. SecPanel supports ssh, scp, and X Windows tunnelling. This ssh tool also has a built-in key generator and retains a history of your connections and key operations. Although the GUI does feel a bit outdated (depending upon the distribution you are using), it is a solid client for connecting to servers.

3. Private Shell

Private Shell is the only client on the list with a price tag. At $49.95 for a commercial license ($29.95 for a non-commercial license), it might seem a bit steep. But when you look at the features (terminal connection, file transfer connection, database connection (MySQL, Oracle, Postgres, DB2), CVS/SVN repository access, SOCKS5 proxy, e-mail server connection, VNC server connection, X11 tunneling, and more), you quickly understand why it has the associated price. To get those features on any other client, you'd wind up having to bundle other apps together. Private Shell also has an outstanding, user-friendly GUI. Private Shell is available only for Windows.

4. Terra Term

Terra Term has been around for quite some time. However, the current version is recognized by the project's original creator. Terra Term offers features such as: Serial port connections, TCP/IP (telnet, SSH-1/2) connections, IPv6 communication, VT100 emulation and selected VT200/300 emulation, TEK4010 emulation, file transfer protocols, its own scripting language, Japanese, English, Russian and Korean character sets, and UTF-8 character encoding. This is another Windows-only client.

5. Linux terminal

Linux terminal. That's right; I cannot create a list of secure shell clients without including the Linux command line equivalent. By default, nearly every Linux distribution has a secure shell client (ssh is the command). To connect to a server, you would typically open up a terminal window and issue a command similar to ssh -v -l jlwallen 192.168.1.1. Of course you will also have the scp (secure copy) command available, which makes the remote copying of files much more secure than standard ftp. Of course, this client is only available on Linux and UNIX-based platforms (Mac included).

Bottom line

Secure shell is a must have/know for many administrators and having a solid client for this task can make the job far easier. Check out one of these clients and see if you don't find the perfect fit for your needs. No matter if you are on Linux, UNIX, Mac, or Windows there is an easy to use secure shell client to handle this task.

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About

Jack Wallen is an award-winning writer for TechRepublic and Linux.com. He’s an avid promoter of open source and the voice of The Android Expert. For more news about Jack Wallen, visit his website getjackd.net.

12 comments
Brainstorms
Brainstorms

There are procedures on the web that detail how to combine CygWin + PuTTY + Pageant to end up with the ability to SSH out of and *into* a Windows platform from either Linux or Windows. Bonus: The procedure I found uses Pageant as a PKI key agent, allowing you to use RSA keys. This allows you to perform secure log-ins between platforms, yet only enter your password once, at the beginning of your session; the agent stores your (unlocked) private key and handles the PKI password-less connections from that point until you end your session. Works with any combination of Linux-Windows, and Windows-Windows. I only wish there were an automated installer...

kdpawson
kdpawson

From my Ubuntu desktop and laptop I just use the built-in SSH client from BASH, really don't see the point in using anything else for straight SSH sessions. For SFTP or FTP I use Filezilla. From a Windows box I use mRemoteNG which takes care of everything if you are on a Windows Machine, including SSH, RDP, VNC, Citrix and so on. http://www.mremoteng.org

sc0ttyd
sc0ttyd

I use Gnome Connection manager. Multiple tabs, SSH/Telnet/local shells, tunnelling, logging, keepalive etc. But nothing beats iTerm2 on the Mac.

Kris.J
Kris.J

I have to say - SecureCRT uber alles! =)

Jaqui
Jaqui

not just for use on a windows system, it runs on all systems [ if you want the gui ]

Mark W. Kaelin
Mark W. Kaelin

These secure shell apps have been around for a long time. Have you discovered a new one that you like better than the older "usual suspects"?

Diakiao
Diakiao

No problem, I posted the question on Experts Exchange once because I don't like using programs that are not actively updated. I mean Putty works, but I'm sure there are SOME tweaks that can be made to improve it. And Kitty proves this :).

anil_g
anil_g

Yeah. Like iTerm2.

PScottC
PScottC

Not only does it provide a nice tabbed interface, but the creators also built APIs that you can hook with your favorite scripting language. If you don't have budget or time to use an SNMP based tool, then being able to script changes to hundreds of devices is the next best thing.

maj37
maj37

I agree with you, I love SecureCRT. I used the non-secure version, CRT, for years and when our primary Unix admin decided telnet within our network was dangerous and started forcing us to use SSH I got SecureCRT. I have used PuTTY and it is OK but the interface, session saving and loading etc. are just too cumbersome for someone that uses it every day in my opinion.