Windows

Five tips for efficient file management in Windows 7

Share these tips with Windows 7 newbies to reduce initial confusion and help them get up to speed quickly.

The Windows 7 environment will spook some XP users at first. It isn't an extension of XP; it's an entirely new interface. Although the underlying file structure is the same, there's less to file management. The truth is, storing and accessing files in XP and earlier versions required some knowledge of the file structure. Windows 7 doesn't require that knowledge -- the file hierarchy is behind the scenes. Consequently, users new to the PC will find Windows 7 easy to use, but those upgrading from XP might be a bit disoriented. These five tips will help your users acclimate themselves to Windows 7 so they can get to work a bit faster.

Note: This article is also available as a PDF download.

1: Get to know the Documents library

Documents is the XP My Documents folder, only better. It's no longer just a folder. Documents is now a library. (I'll explain libraries next.) When you save an Office file, the application will default to Documents, just as it used to default to My Documents. While you're learning Windows 7, save files to Documents because they'll be easy to find later. Just click the Start menu and the Documents library is right there, with all your files. Or open Windows Explorer and click Documents in the Libraries group. Until you learn your way around, saving your files to the Documents library will save you a lot of confusion.

2: Use libraries for quick access

In earlier versions of Windows, you saved files to folders. Windows Explorer displayed the file structure as dozens of folders housing hundreds of files. Depending on your folder structure, some files might be several subfolders deep. Now, remember the old file cabinet analogy? Imagine a long line of file cabinets. Functional, yes, but efficient? Not always. And the more folders and files you added, the more of them you had to wade through to get to what you needed.

A Windows 7 library is more like a storeroom. Imagine that you're in a hall with several doors. The sign on the first door reads "Documents." You open a door to find a few file cabinets storing all your files. The second door's sign reads "Pictures." File cabinets filled with your pictures are inside. Windows 7 knocks the older linear C:\ hierarchy of dozens of folders down to a handful of libraries.

Libraries don't actually store your files. Your files are still stored in the traditional linear hierarchy. Libraries simply pull related folders into one spot for quicker access. It's a virtual view of your hierarchy. I recommend that you try to adjust to the library structure, but if you truly hate it, you can display a more traditional view. To do so, choose Folder And Search Options from the Organize menu. In the Navigation Pane section, check the Show All Folders option.

3: Avoid the HomeGroups password pitfall

HomeGroups are like libraries but they work with networked PCs. Any machine that's part of a HomeGroup can grant read and write access to other machines in the HomeGroup. As you might expect, HomeGroups are password protected. But rather than letting you enter your own password, Windows 7 generates a 10-character password for you. Write this password down and don't lose it! You'll only need it once, when you connect the first time. Once connected, you can change the password to whatever you like.

I don't know why Windows 7 forces this generated password on us, but it does, hence the warning. It's easy to get distracted and forget the password or lose it before you have a chance to connect that first time. In addition, this new feature works only with Windows 7 machines -- an unfortunate decision on Microsoft's part because most of won't be able to utilize it.

4: Save time with jump lists

Jump lists are one of my favorite features. You pin applications and files you use often to the Taskbar. It doesn't matter where you actually store the file. Once it's pinned, you have quick access to it. To add a program, do the following:

  1. Click the Start menu.
  2. Find the application and right-click it.
  3. Choose Pin To Taskbar, as shown in Figure A. Windows 7 adds an icon, shown in Figure B, to the Taskbar.

Figure A

Choose Pin To Taskbar to pin an application to the Taskbar.

Figure B

Click the pinned icon to launch the application.
You can also pin individual files to their respective application's list. With the file open, right-click its program icon on the Taskbar. In the resulting list, right-click the file, as shown in Figure C. Once you've pinned a file, you can quickly open it. Simply right-click the program icon and choose the file from the Pinned section. You'll also see the most recently used files, but that list will change as you open and use new files. The Pinned list doesn't change unless you add or remove items.

Figure C

Pin a file to the Taskbar.

5: Work efficiently with two instances of Windows Explorer

It's easy to work with two instances of Windows Explorer open at the same time, thanks to Windows 7's new snap behavior. First, open Explorer as you normally would by clicking the Explorer icon in the Taskbar. (That's a nice feature in itself.) Drag the window's title bar to the left until Windows 7 displays an outline around the left half of the screen. Release the window and Windows 7 will snap the window to the left half of your screen. To open a second instance, hold down the [Shift] key and click the Explorer icon on the Taskbar again. Repeat the process above, but drag the second instance to the right and release. You end up with two windows, side by side. Moving and copying files is a snap with two instances of the Explorer open.

Now, here's a useful tip for the keyboard users. After opening the first instance of Explorer, hold down the [Windows] key and press the left arrow key. Doing so will automatically align the window to the left side of the screen. Open the second instance, hold down [Windows] and press the right arrow key.

Additional resources

About

Susan Sales Harkins is an IT consultant, specializing in desktop solutions. Previously, she was editor in chief for The Cobb Group, the world's largest publisher of technical journals.

59 comments
RB1955
RB1955

Some years ago I was watching "Computer Chronicles" with Stewert Chiffet (sp?), and one of his guests was showing a product called Personal Brain. I eventually bought the program and haven't looked back with any regret. Lifted from their website ( thebrain dot com): "How the Free Download Works You get 30 days to try all the features of TheBrain Pro. After that if you want to keep using the advanced features you will need to upgrade to TheBrain Pro. If you don't upgrade, you can keep using TheBrain Free Edition. You will not lose any of your work and will still be able to access everything you created." They have demo videos and frequent webinars available as well. I recommend at least looking into it. Just the less-featured free version is worth the effort. Linking "things" (termed "thoughts") allows the user to intuitively organize (and thankfully actually FIND) files, links, emails, pictures, web pages and more. It's like having a Mind-Map of all of your data structure (s) (termed: "Brain") in a clean and interactive interface. And the 'data structure (s)' wording means you can have different and independent data structures depending on your needs. For instance, I have a Brain for work engineering documents, and another one for home things. Disclaimer: I own the program.

locodice
locodice

Holidays is at this time! Does the writer know about this? Be effortless similar local movers, it seems care about clients

pivert
pivert

I keep repeating that they should stop mixing presentation with systems. Suppose you have a "windows-engine" that's small and portable and a "presentation-engine", you could come up with all sorts of great, customizable looks. There would be no need for a windows-mobile, it would just be another presentation-engine. And get rid of the registry. Please :-)

overyonderfield
overyonderfield

You state: "In the resulting list, right-click the file, as shown in Figure C." I get no "resulting list." Just three choices: the option to unpin the application; to close the application; or to open another application window. My spouse has the same Win 7 Pro, and he gets the lists as you show on his computer. What can I do to fix this? (Note: My Win 7 is an upgrade from Vista; his came installed on his computer.)

Rob C
Rob C

I replied to a post above (see post "XYPlorer Tabbed File Manager") Win 7 users will have to buy XYPlorer XP users can locate the earlier free version called XYPlorerFree (v5.5) Here is a review of XYPlorerFree - http://www.techsupportalert.com/best-free-file-manager.htm XYplorerFree is another strong contender. It uses a tabbed view rather than a two pane view which is better when working with multiple folders though not quite as efficient as the two-pane approach when working with only two. XYplorerFree is packed with features including one of the best file-finders I've seen. It's one of those products that impresses more with use. In fact I suspect that if you use it for a month, you'll end up using it permanently. Unfortunately, the free version of this program has been discontinued, but the last free version that was released (v5.55) can still be found on various unofficial sites.

Thack
Thack

You can open and position the Explorer windows in the same sequence: Press-and-hold the Windows key, then go... E left-arrow E right-arrow Release the Windows key It's exceptionally quick - maybe 1.5 to 2 seconds?

Gis Bun
Gis Bun

I've been using Windows 7 now for 14 months [Vista for 9 months prior and Win XP prior to that since probably 2002]. I won't go back. I've had no malware hint [I rarely get much anyways]. I never had any BSODs. System boots up and shuts down nicely. Very rarely do I get a "not responding" issue. I use the explorer favorites and libraries quite a bit. Everything is in My Docs on a separate hard disk. That includes Favorites, My Pictures, My Videos, Outlook 2010 PST file, etc. I just back up from one spot. I created a Library for day to day stuff I download and work on [so that if I need to open or save something I just go into the library instead of drilling down]. Homegroup works nicely so I can transfer stuff between my netbook and my desktop over the network. As for compatibility, I still use PageMaker 7 [dated 2001] and it works fine in Windows 7 64-bit. I have no driver issues. Why the change in interface? Granted some changes could of been better but in most cases Windows 7 changes improve things. A reminder that Windows XP is in extended support from MS. That means no new software [IE, WMP]. Just security updates. Support dies completely in 2014. Other companies have announced that as new hardware comes out they may not provide any Windows XP drivers. So you better pray that nothing dies in your system [or your printer]! As for libraries, this is a great addition if you need to find files on a network. Just add the network location [let it index] and you can search for anything. Can't find that [properly named] picture? No problem. Can't figure out which source code file you put that code in? No problem.

patrokov
patrokov

Say you need to start an Access database with security credentials, you create a shortcut that includes the workgroup file as a run time argument in the target line. In windows XP, you could then copy that shortcut to the Start Menu or Quick Links taskbar. In Windows7, the commandline arguments are lost. In order to get them back, you have to unhide the quick links taskbar and destroy half the functionality of the new taskbar to get run time arguments to work.

wolsonjr
wolsonjr

Libraries are like my mothers old junk room - a mess, and not always the best place for something

Rob C
Rob C

Here is a link that everyone will love - http://windowssecrets.com/?utm_source=Newsletter&utm_medium=email&utm_content=paid&utm_campaign=2583 The article on Win 7 Libraries is the most recent one (near the top) You probably need a free membership, to get to the article - "Make the most of Windows 7's Libraries" Those of you that are fans of the Libraries, will learn a lot more about them. Those that are annoyed by MS changes can go the comments, where I chastise the author for encouraging MS. If you do not have a free membership, it will be worth your while, as the site is famous (but probably has to toe the MS line a bit, as Windows has been their Livelihood for decades). Rob

dlarowe
dlarowe

I didn't see anyone mention about adding a new file location to the Library menu. While adding a local folder is easy, adding one from a networked environment is a pain. You can't just put a new path in... you have to make that folder "always available offline" which sets up the synchronization tool. In theory, it's okay... but it's a pain in the neck to maintain. The synchronization will time-out for whatever reason and I have to walk users through the whole "have patience" concept it will catch up with itself later. Just makes rolling out computers to users a bit more challenging. Now users documents become stored in something like the "X" drive on the server.

Rob C
Rob C

Sheep blindly follow the leader. Abattoirs sometimes use a white goat to lead the sheep up to their slaughter. Why do some people blindly follow whatever MS does, and convince themselves it is better. The Windows 7 Start Menu is an example. It is horrible. The Ribbon is an example. MS adding more smoke and mirrors to File Management is another example. We don't need Libraries. We don't need MS apps, by default, storing documents down the mineshaft of Documents and Settings. If you create your own folders eg C:\Data and then have sub folders under that, you can organize where your files are stored. If YOU LOT KEEP BLINDLY applauding every wrong change that MS does, they will completely take away the ability to organize our folders properly. (EG they will ban us creating a folder like C:\Data) Not Happy, ROB PS If you attempt to make the Win 7 Start Menu as close to Classic as possible, you will find that MS are already blocking access to Folders, that you need to create and organize the Start Menu entries. They are really starting to P..S me off

dogknees
dogknees

The old structures only appear "better" to people because it's what they are used to. The first way you learn to do things feels like the best way. It's a common behavioural trait that we all have, and we come up with all sorts of "reasons" to justify why it's the best. It's not best, it's just what you know. Here's a test. See how many of the people that complain about Win 7 and say they prefer the XP way were saying 7 years ago that Win95/97 was the best and this new XP thing was all wrong, and that they would never use it. Same people were saying 20 years ago that they'd never use a mouse. Get over it! Although it's an automatic reaction, it's not a smart way to behave any more that running around screaming is a smart way to respond to a fire. Recognise it and learn to discard useless old ideas when new ones come along. The "who moved my cheese" argument is no argument at all as far as I'm concerned.

awarren2002
awarren2002

Since my new PC came with Win7 I decided that I am not going to complain and I want all the helpful info I can get. These are helpful to me. I used XP for years.

dhmariano
dhmariano

Seems like what you gave us is just a new way to imagine the windows allegory.

ksawaneh
ksawaneh

i have window 7 in dell inspiron, but the internet explorer is very slow. what is the solution

ozhawk50
ozhawk50

Windows explorer is not as efficient in finding files as its XP predecessor, but if you download Locate32, a small but very efficient search function you will find the results in seconds rather then minutes trying to trawl thru Explorer

paulsbkk
paulsbkk

Users had best "understand" the whole history of the Windows file system since Windows 3 to comprehend, navigate and efficiently manage the structural/logistic mess they are confronted with in 7. MyThisMyThatMyWhateverElse is a horrible start to organizing one's life and projects and it still there used inconsistently among programs many which still store and browse differently than 7. Where is the up a folder arrow? Intuitive? And you fail to mention the non-XP like folder view autoscrolling that renders difficulty for those who like browse the files and structure quickly and keep things organized (hmmmmm seems better suddenly). Libraries and Favorites and Jump lists are certainly very welcome steps up from XP. But libraries can just hide a mess.

Who Am I Really
Who Am I Really

like taking a picture of yer keys and trying to start yer car with it I can't even begin to count how many people I know who have either burned the .lnk rather than the actual file to CD or drag and drop the .lnk files to their USB drive and then they wonder why they can only use the CD or USB drive on their system

leo8888
leo8888

Win7 just provides new and pointless ways to do things we can already do, and adds the extra overhead of yet another overly bloated operating system. Jump lists? Just a fancy replacement for shortcuts. Libraries? Something for people who refuse to take the time to learn the basics of a file system. What will happen when Win7 crashes and the user has to figure out where their files are actually stored in the tree? Seems like MS is trying to turn the operating system into a babysitter for users.

pjp
pjp

I've been computing a long time and over that period of time, I found it best to partition HDD into logical drives, put the OS onto one drive and data on another. One of the best features of XP was that the 'My Documents' folder (and hence any data placed into it) could easily be moved to a different disk drive (partition) which made machine maintenance a lot easier. I have to admit that I have had limited exposure to Win 7, I like what I see, but when I tried to move the Library, it didn't have an obvious way of doing it... can that be done?

ScienceMikey
ScienceMikey

...Use a dual-pane file manager instead. The one in 7-Zip bypasses the pitfalls of Windows Explorer; "xplorer2 Lite" and "Free Commander" blow Explorer away when it comes to copying, moving, or dealing with multiple files across multiple directories.

WATKINS12
WATKINS12

The only use for this is for the uneducated user who would fill up the root directory with files instead of putting them in a logical place (i.e., an appropriately named folder.) MS should concentrate on performance and quit tellling people where and how to store their files,etc. Used to be a an option in Office to set the default file location. I don't use "Documents" or any derivation thereof, because I want to be able to find things.

sjok
sjok

I don't like any "file management" tricks that are basically groups of links that sit on top of the real file structure. I have never used "my documents" etc in windows. I start with "C:" and go from their. I also don't like there USER structure. If I am sharing the computr I simply put top level folders unde "C:" for each sharer. One of the things I always disliked about MS trying to tell you how to structure your files is, it you like to put the path into your documents, then you end up with a bunch of artificial path levels. Also, in windows 7, the search does not appear to be programmed to accommodate "My documents", "libraries", etc. When you search you get duplicate results via libraries, my documents, and the root directory. What would actually help windows explorer would be the ability for users to give different titles and icons to several different levels. For example, buildings, floors, rooms, cabinets, drawers, folders. That is because some users (including my spouse) have trouble dealing with various levels of folders. However, I like the placing two instances of windows explorer side by side - really nice when backing up.

Pat9008
Pat9008

The Libraries concept takes some getting used to. I found it confusing to see documents and files in the Documents folder and then again in a folder under the Documents level. I store most files in folders underneath the MyDocuments level. But if I just click through to the folder it is back to the old organization. Some comments on this thread question the use of the MyDocuments directory. It's clear why Msoft did this - to limit where user files get stored by applications. This is a huge help when it comes to backup. If the default location is used then backing up the MyDocuments saves all the user files and documents. Before then, user files and documents were scattered in directories all over the drives. Which made doing any support a lot more difficult.

chip_long
chip_long

I disagree with you saying XP is still the best fix. If you have upgraded you computer within the last 2 years, XP will cripple it because it can't use all of the processing power your new computer can supply. This is an OK article as far as it goes. It doesn't really talk about some of the actual benefits of the libraries. The description used to describe them is the same as I used as to explain why you use sub-folders. The advantage of Libraries is that you can combine several folders in to one location. Please note I said, "several folders," those folders don't have to all be on the same drive, or even the same computer - this means they can come from DIFFERENT file structures. When I open the Documents Library on my home computer, it will display the documents that I have on my work computer at the same time as those on my home computer. I no longer have to shortcut to the other folder. Win7 did not remove the old file structure. It is still there. I still recommend using an appropriate file structure even in the Libraries. If you are used to the old file structure, Win 7 still makes it easy to navigate it the same ways as you did in the old XP Explorer windows. Even the method of changing the folders in the Explorer is nice with its drop-down lists of sub-folders at each location. I use XP, Vista, Win7 and OS X regularly in my day to day job. I get lots of time to compare the different OSes. OS X has several things to recommend it over Win7, just like Win 7 has things to recommend it over OS X. To be honest though, I will not go back to XP. There is no longer anything there to recommend it over OS X or Win 7, there is plenty or reasons to use it over Vista though.

Pat9008
Pat9008

The snap to the left or right side of the display is a very useful gadget in Win7. For a lot of uses, not just explorer. Especially with a wide-screen 21 or 22 monitor. Open 2 Word docs side-by-side. Or a spreadsheet and a Word doc. Or a browser window and a spreadsheet. It's definitely one of my favorite features. I was doing it manually before in XP, now I don't have to.

songhurst
songhurst

The more I find out about Windows 7 the more convinced I am that I'll never use it. If I need to rethink how I've quite happily stored files on my computer since the first pc then I'll change to Linux. I've never used the My Documents etc stupidity in the first place. Why would I want all my docs in one place, all my pictures in another. A particular project can comprise many different types of file which logically belong together. Microsofts way is totally useless. As for working with 2 instances of Windows Explorer, I can do that in XP and Linux.

3wj
3wj

Windows Explorer is garbage. It jumps around with every click and they refuse to fix it. I recommend Free Commander as a good alternative.

itmanager
itmanager

To me, Libraries are simply a new way to present folders. The analogy of rooms with file cabinets in the article is OK. Personally I've always had a folder called 'Pictures' in which there are other folders "Hawaii 2011', "house", etc. The same for Music, Documents, Software, Downloads, etc etc etc. The Library idea, I think, is more complex than what this article describers. For example, you can add folders to a library. In fact, you can have the same folder in multiple libraries. And, you can delete a library without affecting the folders it contains. Now is all this helpful? I think it could be to those who are not well organized and have a huge collection of disorganized folders. But for people like myself who are well versed in folder management, this isn't a huge help. Never the less, it's interesting.

DBlayney
DBlayney

Hey - give it a chance and try to use it - some of it's good. You can of course just drag an icon from the desktop onto the taskbar, just the same as with the quick launch toolbar in XP and before. Dragging a file (from Explorer or from the desktop) will pin the file to the application it belongs to; if the application is not yet on the taskbar it will be put there for you, nice touch. When I remember to use it, the list of recent files is helpful, it can take one step out of the normal process of opening the application and then looking in the recently-used list, especially now that Office 2010 makes it a little more difficult to see the Recent list once you are in the application. (Bring back the "Office" button say I!) Equally useful can be the popup of images of all the open pages/files for an application that comes when you "hover" the mouse pointer over the application icon on the taskbar, this is a potential time-saver. Being able to directly close a file from the pop-up image is not bad either. I'm sure there's more that I haven't seen yet. (Read the manual? What me?)

dave.g.johnson
dave.g.johnson

Besides the obfuscation of the file directory, and the marginal utility of pinning a file to an app, what's new? I mean, we've always been able to open two instances of Windows Explorer and drag files... Big whoop.

doms
doms

to open quickly a second windows use the key "windows" + e. TO have rapidly 2 explorer windows on your screen : windows + e windows + left arrow windows + e windows + right arrow. cool :-)

ScienceMikey
ScienceMikey

...describes xplorer2--and the "lite" version, too--so you get the best of BOTH worlds. It didn't even occur to me to check until your post on XYPlorer, so thanks for that!

Thack
Thack

Sorry, I've just notice doms has made the same comment. My apologies.

Gis Bun
Gis Bun

Huh? Create a new shortcut and then edit the properties ogf the shortcut. How hard is that.

ssharkins
ssharkins

In the old structure, I have many subfolders, sometimes a few layers deep. Using the new structure, those "subfolders" are just a simple click away, rather than 3 or 4 clicks deep. They're still 3 or 4 layers deep, just quicker to access.

leo8888
leo8888

It's about users being forced to learn new ways to do things when there is no real need to. Make libraries a feature that can be enabled instead of a default behavior. It doesn't matter which version of Windows someone uses, it's not just the "XP way", a file system is a file system and if users learned the basics of how to organize their own files and folders there would be no need for libraries. Why is the tried and true method of organizing files and folders now suddenly useless? Judging from the comments I am not alone in thinking that I should not suddenly need to be shown a new way to do something that already works perfect they way it is.

Pat9008
Pat9008

Windows 7 is not adding bloat and overhead. I'd say it runs about the same speed as XP.And starts up faster. Big improvement over Vista. Also if you don't like the libraries go ahead and use the folders. There are a LOT of users that will not take the time to learn folders and directories.

metalmaniac10
metalmaniac10

I like the new "My Documents" structure. I used to do it that way back in XP but inside my documents. Eg. (My Documents (My Videos, My Music, My Pictures, Documents, Downloads, etc.)). When doing a backup all you need to do now is copy the user folder and your done. In OSX it babysits the users and seems that people like it because its market share is rising. And about the OS Wars, I liked Windows XP until malware, Liked Vista (SP1 up), Like Windows 7, Ubuntu 10.X, and Mehh OSX. If i have to use it I'll use OSX but after installing Firefox, but not as my main OS. P.D. I skip the libraries function altogether. Don???t like having everything thrown together in a category. I'll stick with the usual folder structure found on the user???s folder. The function is still there but I down feel obligated to use it.

Rob C
Rob C

After you have used a File Manager with Tabs, you will never use Windows Explorer again. It is not free, but XYPlorer is brilliant. It does not require Installation.

tr-gtn
tr-gtn

Any number of windows can easily be horizontally or vertically arranged in XP. While holding down the CTRL key, select any number of running application windows from the taskbar (this is the same familiar procedure as is used for any multi-select process in Windows). After you're done selecting, release the CTRL key, and simply right click on any of those selected taskbar items. Then select "Tile Horizontally" (or vertically, if you prefer) from the pop-up menu. This is every bit as easy as the Win 7 procedure, even easier when arranging more than two windows, it just was never hyped as a "new feature."

Gis Bun
Gis Bun

Ever noticed that you can move the folders anywhere? I have My docs in a separate drive. Favorites, My Pictures and others are inside it. Just back up My Docs and I'm done. If you want to back up your files it's better than having to remember where everything is. [Outlook Express and Outlook files can also be moved inside My Docs.]

Who Am I Really
Who Am I Really

there would be no room for any taskbar buttons of open but not pinned apps I checked the space on my monitor and there's no room for anything after 15 items are pinned

oterrya
oterrya

If you are talking "XP" to "Win 7", then most everything. Win 7 works, and is more stable. What more do you want?

mckinnej
mckinnej

That's a good sequence that's just begging to be a macro.

Rob C
Rob C

I recently 'installed' about 5 free ones, and set them up as close as possible, to what I like (Left navigation pane, and right details pane(s) in Tabs). My C Directory has tons of files and Folders. I just fired up XPlorer2 Lite, and it stuttered and stalled. XYPlorerFree does not have that problem, and has other benefits. Do what I did, and compare the two. I think you may become a believer. Yell out if you have trouble finding the download for the free version. Rob

patrokov
patrokov

It's impossible for a jumplist shortcut to contain commandline arguments. Why don't you try it? I'll forgive your ignorant outburst, because I couldn't believe MS would be so stupid either.

leo8888
leo8888

I have tried it both at work and at home and still do not like it. I even have a dual boot setup on my laptop between 7 and XP and I always go back to XP when I want to get anything done. As for it running the same I don't agree. I've done several downgrades from Win7 to WinXP and the machines all performed better with the XP. Just look at the installation media and the installed size for both and you will see that Win7 takes up a heck of a lot more hard disk space so how can you say it's not adding bloat? I'm still trying to force myself to use it and maybe eventually I will find something I like about it but so far I have not.

ScienceMikey
ScienceMikey

I agree on pinning vs. QL. The "Quick Launch" functionality is still there, but it's hidden by default. You can create a "New Toolbar", call it "QuickLaunch" and point it to the QuickLaunch folder that's under Users//AppData/Roaming/Microsoft/Internet Explorer. It works the same as always. I think it may have been removed in response to the IE unbundling issues with Windows 7 in Europe, rather than for any practical reason.