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30+ geeky suggestions for your winter reading list

Our reading list includes sci-fi, fantasy, fiction and non-fiction, new releases and classics, and more. We hope you find at least one title that piques your interest.
If you're looking for a good book to get you through the long winter nights, you might give at least one of the titles in our gallery Recommended geeky reads for this winter a look (the picks are also in list format below). The gallery features a compilation of suggestions by TechRepublic editors, contributors, and readers.

  1. A Song of Ice and Fire: A Dance with Dragons by George R. R. Martin
  2. Stephen Hawking: An Unfettered Mind by Kitty Ferguson
  3. The Art of the Hobbit by J. R. R. Tolkien
  4. Diablo III: Book of Cain by Deckard Cain and Blizzard Entertainment
  5. Star Trek Vault: 40 Years from the Archives by Scott Tipton
  6. Star Wars: The Complete Vader by Ryder Windham and Peter Vilmur
  7. 1632 by Eric Flint
  8. Embassytown by China Mieville
  9. Empire State by Adam Christopher
  10. Fool: A Novel by Christopher Moore
  11. Girl Genius Novels: Agatha H. and the Airship City by Phil Foglio and Kaja Foglio
  12. In the Company of Ogres by A. Lee Martinez
  13. Steve Jobs by Walter Isaacson
  14. Kingkiller Chronicles: The Name of the Wind by Partrick Rothfuss
  15. Leviathan Wakes by James S. A. Corey
  16. Locked On by Tom Clancy
  17. Pride and Prejudice and Zombies by Jane Austen and Seth Grahame-Smith
  18. Ready Player One by Ernest Cline
  19. Star Trek: Mirror Universe: Rise Like Lions by David Mack
  20. Star Wars: The Old Republic: Deceived by Paul S. Kemp
  21. Terry Jones' Medieval Lives by Terry Jones
  22. The Age of Unreason: Newton's Cannon by J. Gregory Keyes
  23. The Dresden Files: Storm Front by Jim Butcher
  24. Zone One: A Novel by Colson Whitehead
  25. The Rivan Codex: Ancient Texts of THE BELGARIAD and THE MALLOREON by David and Leigh Eddings
  26. Vortex by Robert Charles Wilson
  27. Physics of the Impossible by Michio Kaku
  28. A Universe from Nothing: Why There is Something Rather than Nothing by Lawrence M. Krauss
  29. The Professor and the Madman by Simon Winchester
  30. Frankenstein by Mary Shelley
  31. The Time Machine by H.G. Wells

4 comments
CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

When you finish the hardcover, try the ongoing semi-steampunk comic (the authors dislike that term) it's based on: http://www.girlgeniusonline.com/comic.php?date=20021104 Updated MWF, and there's just short of a decade in the archives. The first chapter / prologue is sepia-toned, and the rest is glorious color. Safe for work, and thoroughly addictive.

Tony Hopkinson
Tony Hopkinson

Oh that was a hard one, I mean we've only been waiting for years having read the first four and seen book one on the telly.... Are you sure these are for geeks? Dweebs would be nearer. David Eddings, to quote one of my favourite characters in one of ny favourite books, "Gah". Surprised you didn't throw in Number Of the Beast, SOT and WOT, Pratchet, and of course several books involving sparkly types who only drink blood when they have to... Guilty of loose and muddy thinking is all I can say.

GSG
GSG

I loved his earlier books, especially the 2 series about Belgarion and the 2 series about Sparhawk, and the standalone, "The Redemption of Althalus", but his later stuff wasn't that great. I'm currently re-reading The Hobbit.

GSG
GSG

Broken Blade by Kelly McCullough -- It's an interesting premise where the goddess of justice uses her disciples as assassins to kill people who are not bound by the normal rules of law, like Kings who commit genocide. The assassins are bound to Shades, who live in their shadows and can speak to them and give them other abilities. The main character is the last known (to him anyway) living disciple of his goddess who was murdered by the other gods. He now takes jobs just to keep himself in a room and full of booze until he gets a job from a mysterious woman to deliver a letter. Then he finds he's not so alone. It's a bit different from the usual fantasy where the poor young boy/girl is picked to go on a quest for jewel/sword/save the princess, and gathers a group of diverse companions to save the jewel/sword/princess from the evil sorceror/god/demon/whatever.