Project Management

50 ubergeeks worth following on Twitter

Jay Garmon lists 50 top-shelf geeks to be found on Twitter (in no particular order of awesomeness). A few people listed are Warren Ellis, John Cleese, Wil Wheaton, and John Hodgman.

Below are 50 top-shelf geeks to be found on Twitter, listed in no particular order of awesomeness. Suffice it to say, they're all cooler than me. If you don't know what Twitter is, Jason Hiner explains it here. If you do know what Twitter is, but aren't following these people yet, snap to. There's precious bandwidth and productivity to squander!

  1. Wil Wheaton (@wilw) - Don't call him Wesley Crusher, because he's so much more awesome than that.
  2. Felicia Day (@feliciaday) - Vi from Buffy the Vampire Slayer. Creator of The Guild. Gaming goddess.
  3. Scott Kurtz (@pvponline) - Writer/artist of the Web comic PvP.
  4. Tobias Buckell (@tobiasbuckell) - Caribbean-born sci-fi writer exiled to Ohio.
  5. Mary Robinette Kowal (@MaryRobinette) - Puppeteer, voice-actress, and sci-fi writer.
  6. Warren Ellis (@warrenellis) - Profane and ingenious writer of comics, books, TV, and video games.
  7. Phil Plait (@BadAstronomer) - Evangelizing astronomer, educator, and movie science geek.
  8. LeVar Burton (@levarburton) - Actor/educator of Reading Rainbow, Roots, ST: TNG. Technophile.
  9. Jon Favreau (@jon_favreau) - Comedic actor. Director of Elf, Iron Man, and (now) Iron Man 2.
  10. Stephen Fry (@stephenfry) - Sublimely funny British actor, author, and comic.
  11. Agent M (@Agent_M) - Insider blogger for Marvel Comics.
  12. Chris Hardwick (@nerdist) - Musician, comic, actor, and Attack of the Show dude.
  13. FragDolls (@FragDolls) - Hot babes who play video games for a living.
  14. John Cleese (@JohnCleese) - Monty Pythonite and so much more.
  15. John Scalzi (@scalzi) - Snarktacular science-fiction writer and blogger.
  16. Valerie D'Orazio (@ohsuperheroine) - Writer/blogger/activist for women in comics.
  17. Lore Sjöberg (@loresjoberg) - Wired magazine's animator/artist/comic-in-residence.
  18. John Hodgman (@hodgman) - Deadpan nerd-comic, actor, and Daily Show correspondent.
  19. Greg Grunberg (@greggrunberg) - Web fanatic who plays Parkman on Heroes.
  20. TrekMovie.com (@TrekMovie) - The fan Web site for the new Star Trek reboot flick.
  21. Brent Spiner (@BrentSpiner) - Faux-curmudgeon comic who once played Data on ST:TNG.
  22. Neil Gaiman (@neilhimself) - Writer of fantasy comics and prose that get made into major movies.
  23. Penn Jillette (@pennjillette) - The vocal half of comic/magic/activist duo Penn & Teller.
  24. David Hewlett (@dhewlett) - More than just the guy who played Rodney McKay on Stargate: Atlantis.
  25. Martin Sargent (@martinsargent) - Manchild super-nerd from various tech TV shows.
  26. Olivia Munn (@oliviamunn) - The hottie co-host of Attack of the Show.
  27. Scott Beale (@laughingsquid) - Geek-blogger supreme from LaughingSquid.com.
  28. Major Nelson (@majornelson) - Yes, Xbox fanboys, that Major Nelson.
  29. Brea Grant (@breagrant) - Music-lover, actress, and geek known as Daphne from Heroes.
  30. Jeph Jacques (@jephjacques) - Writer/artist behind the Web comic Questionable Content.
  31. Cory Doctorow (@doctorow) - Co-founder of BoingBoing, copyfighter, sci-fi writer, etc.
  32. Robert Bowling (@fourzerotwo) - Gaming blogger and employee at Infinity Ward.
  33. Eddie Izzard (@eddieizzard) - Crossdressing super-nerd British comedian.
  34. Amber Benson (@amber_benson) - Tara from Buffy turned writer/actress/geek.
  35. Jonathan Strahan (@CoodeStreet) - Hugo Award-winning editor of sci-fi anthologies.
  36. John Joseph Adams (@johnjosephadams) - Leading editor and reviewer of sci-fi and fantasy.
  37. Cherie Priest (@cmpriest) - Southern gothic fantasy/horror author exiled to Seattle.
  38. Lar deSouza (@lartist) - Artist for Web comics Looking For Group and Least I Could Do.
  39. MC Frontalot (@mc_frontalot) - Nerdcore rap star.
  40. John Denardo (@sfsignal) - Blogger-in-chief at SFSignal.com.
  41. David Willis (@Shortpacked) - Writer/artist for the toy-collector Web comic Shortpacked.
  42. R. Stevens (@rstevens) - Writer/artist for the pixelated hipster-geek comic Diesel Sweeties.
  43. Dave Zatz (@davezatz) - Consumer technology reviewer and insider.
  44. Jonathan Coulton (@jonathancoulton) - Nerd-pop recording artist.
  45. Rich Johnston (@richjohnston) - Comic book industry's most notorious rumor-monger.
  46. Brian Michael Bendis (@BRIANMBENDIS) - Writer of comic books, notably Ultimate Spider-man.
  47. Jay Lake (@jay_lake) - Writer/editor/blogger of science fiction books.
  48. Rob Corddry (@robcorddry) - Ascerbic nerd comic and actor.
  49. Kevin Smith (@ThatKevinSmith) - Geekish writer/director/actor who gave us Clerks and Dogma.
  50. Paul and Storm (@paulandstorm) - Comedic musician duo with a nerdy flair.

About

Jay Garmon has a vast and terrifying knowledge of all things obscure, obtuse, and irrelevant. One day, he hopes to write science fiction, but for now he'll settle for something stranger -- amusing and abusing IT pros. Read his full profile. You can a...

32 comments
esalkin
esalkin

This is a list of *famous people* on twitter not Uber-geeks. Interesting - maybe. Geeks - maybye. uber - one or two (with a little "u") Uber-geeks invent or transform tech. People who write about tech are just plain geeks.

Nobscotter
Nobscotter

I would also add Adam Savage (@DontTryThis) and Grant Imahara (@GrantImahara) from Mythbusters.

Tink!
Tink!

I like that show.

richjohnston
richjohnston

Despite the in-no-particular-order aspect, I do appreciate being listed one above Brian Bendis... thank you! Rich Johnston

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

Almost everyone listed maintains a full RSS-enabled web log, and in some cases has done so for years. If I'm already subscribed to their web logs, what do I gain from the Twitter feed? Especially since many Twitter messages just say "Updated my blog!" Sorry, I still don't 'get' Twitter.

Tink!
Tink!

...still not quite sure. At first Twitter seem pretty pointless to me. But then, as I went about checking on my other sites and realized that at least half of them allowed you auto update to Twitter...I began to understand that Twitter basically allowed you to have ONE place where you can notify everyone of updates on ANY and ALL of your sites. So instead of having them visit every one of your sites to see if you've changed anything, they can go to Twitter and see everything that changed and then visit the proper site from there. At least that's what I get out of it. I have also noticed though, there is a social aspect of it that attracts those that have time on their hands to sit and idly post banter back and forth on each other's Twitter pages.

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

"I began to understand that Twitter basically allowed you to have ONE place where you can notify everyone of updates on ANY and ALL of your sites." I assume you mean other social networking sites. Since I don't participate in any of them, don't understand why someone would utilize more than one, and don't know the difference between any of them, I'm not going to benefit from this aspect of Twitter. "... there is a social aspect ... to sit and idly post banter back and forth on each other's Twitter pages." Despite Jason Hiner's attempts to explain it to me, I find it impossible to follow a conversation between two people on Twitter. The replies don't seem to always link to the correct previous remark, and I don't know how to backtrack beyond a single previous comment. Trying to follow the conversation backwards confuses me all to heck.

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

I can see some value to it for certain professions. Real estate agents might find it handy to update clients about a house that just came on the market that meets their needs. What I don't understand how using Twitter is superior to using any of the pre-existing communications tools (messaging, e-mail, etc.). But I viewing it from the perspective of someone who doesn't use any of those tools in the first place. As far as non-professional use, I agree it looks pretty useless. Most of what I do for entertainment may look equally useless to others who aren't interested in gardening or NASCAR. I'm trying to confine my view of Twitter and other social tools to workplace suitability, but that view is colored by my basic lack of social skills.

wiggumc1
wiggumc1

I have been reading these posts and I agree with you Palmetto. Twitter seems like a complete and utter waste of time. Think of this, when a city puts up red light cameras, people scream about their right to privacy. Then what do they do? They go home and tweet ALL DAY about what they are doing or make stupid videos to post on YouTube letting people know what they did. As for me, I have too much to do, and better things to do than constantly update people on what I am doing.

Tink!
Tink!

In your case yes, I agree, there is very little Twitter can offer you. Unless you are someone who keeps tabs on several sites that belong to one person, there isn't much usefulness. :)

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

As an author, you're trying to attract attention. I see this as going beyond the 'social' aspect of these tools into the 'marketing' arena. There's absolutely nothing wrong with that, but I have no need for this. I'm not self-employed looking for customers; I'm not in the job market; I'm not a content creator in search of an audience. I'm trying to sort through all the hoopla and determine if there's anything for me to gain by utilizing in any of these social tools. So far it doesn't look like it but Twitter strikes me as the least useful, as either a reader or creator.

Tink!
Tink!

in that aspect. I don't have time to track down the conversations. Nor have they yet to interest me. I updated my TR profile recently to include my OTHER sites. :p All of which I'm not involved in for the SOCIAL aspect of chit-chat, but more for publicity on what I can write. (plus some sites pay - meager amounts - but something at least)

Geek3001
Geek3001

While the people listed may have RSS-enabled web logs, there are others who don't. I see Twitter as being a stream of consciousness alternative to blogs. Call it chat, with memory. I'm still exploring it though. But in the limited time I've been on, I've made connections with a group I had been a part of about eight years ago, when the group was just forming.

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

"I see Twitter as being a stream of consciousness alternative to blogs." I've looked at some of the recommended Twitter pages today, but I'm still missing the appeal. The vast majority of the posts just didn't interest me; I realize that's just my opinion. I picked three people who's work I already respect outside of Twitter. I've read Wil Wheaton's blog for years, and love Neil Gaiman's writing and Jeph Jacques' comic. But I don't get why anyone would care what a total stranger had for lunch, how their favorite team did, what they're listening to, how late it is, etc. Hell, I don't care about these events for people I know. Maybe others are interested in these little personal details but they strike me as clutter enabled by the ease of posting that Twitter enables, the kind of clutter that usually doesn't make it to web log entry. Maybe I'm just anti-social. I'm lousy with faces and names, and I would never attempt to reconnect with someone I haven't seen in several years just to trade "How ya doin'?" messages. With me it's always been pretty much "out of sight, out of mind".

PonderousMan
PonderousMan

I like the point about connections - I've done the same thing, though at this point that community is also available on FB and on an earlier, self-run BBS-ish platform. For those who chose to use it to put out pithy bits, it can be very effective and funny - and the opportunity to jump in from time to time is pretty kewl, I think. I'm not expecting @dvorak or even @jonathancoulton to ReTweet me, but he might just read some comment I make...

NotSoChiGuy
NotSoChiGuy

..it is an evil plot perpetrated by the cellular cabal to raise revenues via SMS charges. ;) Tinfoil hat aside, I really haven't seen/heard/read any compelling reasons to use this service, either.

PonderousMan
PonderousMan

Right - after all, why would anyone want to spend time typing on a 10 digit keyboard to send people short messages, when they could just call them? Don't forget, the medium IS the message. Twitter has its own culture and standards, just like AOL, Angelfire, Bebo, MySpace... you get the idea, maybe. If you don't like the culture, or it doesn't make sense, then don't use it. But don't suggest other people are weird for doing so...

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

"...the idea that "I don't like it, why should anyone else?" seems sort of silly to me.' Agreed, but I never said I didn't like Twitter. I also don't remember saying anything critical of those who use it (or SMS). I said I don't get it, specifically what the advantages are of Twitter and its 140-character limit over existing blogging tools, or why one would send text message from a voice-capable telephone. I still don't get it, but in the intervening weeks I've decided to stop worrying about potential business uses of Twitter. See http://techrepublic.com.com/5208-1035-0.html?forumID=102&threadID=306691

PonderousMan
PonderousMan

I am taking "culture" in the sense of habits, customs, attitudes, etc. that show up in a common group of people. While we all get a sense of "culture" in large groups, IMHO a smaller version of culture forms any time a group gathers together - any team that goes through "forming, storming, norming, performing" creates a shared culture for that group. As for why anyone sends messages, I was not being totally facetious, but yeah, I was being a bit snarky. I was taking as given that millions of people use SMS, and the idea that "I don't like it, why should anyone else?" seems sort of silly to me. I myself don't use it very often, but clearly it has some appeal, whatever it is, and I don't understand why someone would be critical of others just because As for "suggest other people being weird", that was a bit of projection on my part - but I don't think it's a big stretch from (what I read as) the critical tone of your original comment to the idea that you disapprove of or dislike those who do use Twitter or SMS. To me, disapproval tends to imply a lack of something in the person/thing disapproved of, thus it might be seen as "weird". If this was an unfair inference, please accept my apologies.

rebeccaaward
rebeccaaward

Recently (last 4 weeks I suppose), I noticed that when some random person sent me a message via AIM (the AOL Message service, just in case someone doesn't know - though I doubt it), and I clicked the Check Profile button, it has been taking me to Bebo. Apparently, Bebo and AIM are now somehow connected (one bought out the other?) I had never heard of Bebo before those instances, and it doesn't seem to have made the process any better because those random people STILL have no profile, so I still mark them as spammers and put permanent ignore on their username.

NotSoChiGuy
NotSoChiGuy

...opine that people were weird for using it?? ?:| The only people referenced in my post were an evil cellular provider cabal (as part of an obvious joke) and myself. Methinks thy doth protest too much!! Well, that, or your response got tacked on to the wrong post. ;)

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

"Twitter has its own culture and standards, just like AOL, Angelfire, Bebo, MySpace... you get the idea, maybe." Maybe. I never heard of Angelfire or Bebo before your post, and have never done anything with MySpace. As to AOL, I thought the only culture it had was mold or fungus. But I guess I get your point if I look at the environment here at TR. "Right - after all, why would anyone want to spend time typing on a 10 digit keyboard to send people short messages, when they could just call them?" Was you question facetious or in earnest? I've long wondered about that, too. I have no cell phone and have never used instant messaging. If you were joking, I'd appreciate you explaining what factor users take into account when making that decision. "If you don't like the culture, or it doesn't make sense, then don't use it. But don't suggest other people are weird for doing so..." Would you mind quoting what I said that suggested Twitter users are 'weird'? I think you're reading something into my post that I didn't intend.

PonderousMan
PonderousMan

I like this list, maybe not entirely in the order I would put things, but hey. I am already following many more than I expected from this list, and found a couple really good new ones (HTF did I miss @ThatKevinSmith?!) Keep sharing the Twitterlove!

Tink!
Tink!

I just signed up on Twitter last week and in my flailings about there (literally - I was dumbfounded as to the whole point for a couple of days) I managed to stumble upon 3 of the above listed people all on my own. Wil Wheaton - because I always wondered what became of him after STNG. Kevin Smith - because I knew who he was and have been amused by the movies of his that I HAVE seen. Agent M - only because the name was familiar along with the association to Marvel. These 3 appeared in the suggested list offered by Twitter I think. That's how I managed to find them. :)

Geek3001
Geek3001

Oddly enough, I'm also on the Twitter newbie list. It has been interesting and I'll probably pick up on several of the names. (Some are already on it.)