Nasa / Space

A rose is a rose is a Daylight Saving Time


Recently I have edited and published a couple of articles regarding the problems IT pros may have to deal with now that Daylight Saving Time is arriving three weeks earlier this year and lasting a week longer in the Fall. (One for Windows and one for Linux. Mac OS X is on the way.)

During the editing process I became aware that the correct term for the legislated event is Daylight Saving Time. My entire life I was lead to believe by my family, mainly by my mother and father, that the event was named Daylight Savings Time. Not much of a difference granted, and in the grand scheme I think either form communicates the thing it needs to communicate. However, it got me to wondering about other phrases my family localized during my youth. Many of them I have out-grown and are lost and forgotten, but I still wonder about how many remain in my lexicon.

Of course some of the coined terminology my father still uses are classic malapropisms in the Archie Bunker, Norm Crosby tradition and not phrases I repeat in normal conversation. However, my brothers and I think they are humorous and give Dad some grief over them on occasion. To share just a few:

Actual word or phrase

My father's take

Rottweiler

Muttweiler

Ear muffs

Ear gruffs

Grits

Griffs

I know there are more, and I'm going to have to start writing them down so they can be shared with future generations. Do you have family-only turns of phrase that are peculiar or otherwise amusing? What about local phrases? Maybe something particular to the company you work for?

About

Mark Kaelin is a CBS Interactive Senior Editor for TechRepublic. He is the host for the Microsoft Windows and Office blog, the Google in the Enterprise blog, the Five Apps blog and the Big Data Analytics blog.

13 comments
ITSecurityGuy
ITSecurityGuy

Originally intended as humor, I eventually found myself saying it that way unintentionally, almost as if I had unlearned the correct term.

DMambo
DMambo

My father hated any music produced after about 1952. He mangled the names of the artists on purpose: "Elvis Parsley" "The Rolling Stooges" "Bruce Bedspring" "The Grating Dead" "The Whoever" and my favorite, a local blues player, "Taj Mahal?? Taj Myass!!" There were others, but they don't come to mind right now. Apparently it's genetic. When my kids were younger, I referred to their boybands as "In Stync" and "The Backdoor Boys".

BALTHOR
BALTHOR

And I am calling you to task.Your category is Geekend and humor.You must prove to me that this time change in America is mandated by American law.Changing the time in all clocks seems to be even theoretically impossible to me.Are you certain that this is an American law?I am calling you to task.

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

I think you meant to post this in one of the Daylight Saving Time discussions. That seems to be your current rant-du-jour. Next time read the article, not just the title, before you shoot your mouth off.

JamesRL
JamesRL

In written communication, particularly written communcation on the internet, writing in all caps is considered to be the equivalent of shouting. Please refrain unless you want to shout. James

Tig2
Tig2

Is malapropisms. Not DST. My fave to hate is a localism- "Take me with" and opposed to "Take me with you" And my dad had some Archie in him too.

boxfiddler
boxfiddler

'Presheeatcha'. Arkansan for Thank You. Love that! One that drives me up a wall? Noocular. Sheesh. edit to add: not malapropisms, but fun anyway.

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

I think it's more of a generational phrase. I don't think anybody over 25 uses it, but I've been wrong before. It's in the same league with "You wanna?"

Tig2
Tig2

It is a frequently heard phrase in MN and used by all age groups. The axe versus ask thing is not nearly common here. I used to hear that one in California though. You really want to set me off, use "irregardless" in a sentence. I hate that one!

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

Axe, as in, "I wanna axe you a question."

JamesRL
JamesRL

We hear it in Ontario, in urban and suburban areas. It grates on me like long fingernails running down a blackboard. James

Wally Bahny
Wally Bahny

What about web malapropisms like n00b and w00t and all of those other goofy words that chatters and gamers use? It's almost a different language sometimes.

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