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Conspiracy theories for geeks

Wally Bahny highlights popular and a few obscure conspiracy theories in the realms of science and technology. What is your favorite geeky conspiracy theory? Let us know.

Have you ever wondered if the Apollo moon landings were real, or what would happen if aliens came to Earth (yes, I said if)? Many humans have.

Conspiracy theories are a prominent part of human culture -- humans are a curious and questioning race, so it only makes sense. From conspiracies about UFOs to suppressed technologies, we have created theories about things we don't understand and things that just don't seem right.

In the TechRepublic photo gallery 10 geeky conspiracy theories, I look at popular and a few obscure theories in the realms of science and technology.

What is your favorite geeky conspiracy theory? Which conspiracy theories do you believe or at least like to read about? Weigh in with your comments.

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87 comments
shanejosephtaylor
shanejosephtaylor

Here's one for you, goto www.trademe.co.nz and search for "stonehenge theory"

l_e_cox
l_e_cox

"Conspiracy theories" originate from a valid human concern: that an ill-intentioned person or group in our environment is lying to us to get us to cooperate with them. There have in fact been many examples of this in history, and many people have more personal examples of similar experiences in their own lives. That this urge to "stay on one's toes" is being mocked, ridiculed, and impersonated by the same people who want to hide their true intentions, or gullible others connected to them, is I think the more important observation to make about the current scene. That said, some of these theories sound very outlandish. Why would anyone go to the trouble of faking a whole moon shot and landing, for instance? Could that really make that big a difference to anyone in the long run? My only answer is that it takes a high level of discernment these days to know what data to take seriously. Both sides seem to be playing this game, so we have a lot of conflicting claims to sort through. I have two main tests when I am confronted with accusative data of this type: 1) Can I trace the data back to sources that are real people? 2) Do those people seem sincere? If Both these points are "yes" for a datum or story, it would behoove one to take a good look. People really do exist who will lie without regret to gain cooperation from others. That cooperation can result in severe suffering and setbacks for whole societies. Look at the German holocaust before World War II. If we want to keep this planet running, it pays to take a look at accusations that are traceable and seem sincere.

gueibor
gueibor

...were concocted by the One World Government in order to keep us distracted from the One Great Conspiracy. Or sumthin.

Murfski-19971052791951115876031193613182
Murfski-19971052791951115876031193613182

This isn't really a conspiracy, but I have personal experience of it. I was in the server room one night after hours, and hear the cables whispering and rustling as they had their orgies that left them all tangled up the next morning. It has to be that way; we laid all those cables out nice and neat.

mlozano71
mlozano71

The Toyota 'sudden speeding' problem was caused by hackers discovering the manufacturer's secret computer access codes and hacking into the chip's Bluetooth where they 'deliberatly' or 'accidently' caused the cars to speed up. The manufacturer and the gov't are hushing it up to avoid a panic, but more to cover up the gov't's ability to control any computer-equiped (almost all makes) car.

GSG
GSG

aluminum foil so that I can have plenty of it for my hats.

jamie
jamie

For Me - Its the theory that it wasn't the Titanic that sank in 1912, but one of her older sister ships. The fact the two ships lay along side each other at the H&W shipyards just before she sailed. Seeming discrepancies in the line up of the port holes on the sunken ship not matching the Titanic's blue prints, but they do with the "Olympic"?

aandruli
aandruli

The one where a half dozen billionaires get together and decide everything that will happen in the world -- collapse of banks and insurance companies, major recessions, even the BP oil spill. Heard this one many times over the years described many different ways and even now and then they mention the name of a "member>"

NickNielsen
NickNielsen

I can trace the book "The DaVinci Code" directly back to Dan Brown. Dan Brown seems sincere. Does that make the contents of the book truth? I can trace other conspiracy theories back to individuals who all seem sincere, as well, yet that does not validate their theories. My criteria for separating truth from conspiracy theory: 1. Does it make sense? Is the conclusion believable in the context of the times to which the theory applies? 2. Is it well documented? Are there references to generally accepted historical documents so I can independently check the facts, should I wish to? 2. Is it scientifically accurate? Does the theory take into account the laws of physics and other sciences, or does it ignore or dismiss them? 3. Does it dismiss or ignore physical evidence contrary to the theory's conclusions? Answers other than "yes, yes, yes, no" lead me to discount the theory as more distraction than anything else. Hey, now there's a theory: All the people putting forward all these conspiracy theories are working for "them" to keep us from focusing our attention.

santeewelding
santeewelding

When we got words. Wait a minute. You just used them. Are you trying to control my mind?

DaemonSlayer
DaemonSlayer

But... Logically speaking... what a better way of distracting people from the truth. Give them some "lie" to chase down and cry about while you go on your merry own business of whatever. Coliseums for for Ancient Rome anyone? Could hide some truth in some lies in a "conspiracy theory" just to keep what truth within unbelieved too. too many possibles. too many theories. too many unknowns. if facts exist, they are hidden or camouflaged well. Not too hard sometimes to hide something under our own noses if we only recognize it as "SEP" (Someone Else's Problem) or bury it deep within fiction. As far as what's really true and what isn't, time will reveal for those theories with some "future" effect will either never come to be, or will be.

Zenith545
Zenith545

Its true!!!! Its true!!!!! ;)

Alzie
Alzie

Going back to the 1950's electronics in airplanes and space vehicles have had multiple redundancies to prevent interference from space from affecting their systems. It is known that some of these cosmic rays do reach the earth and can cause problems for electronic devices such as cell phones. So why not cars?

Wally Bahny
Wally Bahny

This one was new to me, but it would've been easy to put in a gallery!

keith2237
keith2237

The theory that all highways and rail lines are designed to facilitate transport of people to detention camps when the One World Government takes over. With the Amtrak facility in Beech Grove, IN in fact being designed as an extermination camp.

RudHud
RudHud

It wasn't the Titanic. It was another ship that looked just like it! This is the perfect conspiracy theory.

BFilmFan
BFilmFan

There were three nearly identical ships built for the White Star Liners company named the Titanic, Olympic and Britannic. Olympic was built first and had a collision with the cruiser HMS Hawke on 20 September 1911. She was repaired with components from Titanic, which was under construction at the time. She was requsitioned as a troopship in 1915. During the war, she struck and sank the German submarine U103. Sailors and troops conidered her a lucky ship and she was given the nickname "Old Reliable." She struck a Nantuckeet lightship in 1934 with the loss of 7 lives. She was scrapped in 1935. Her fittings were sold off at auction and can be found on boats and museum collections all over the world, like the Southampton Maritime Museum. The Britannic was launched on 14 February 1914 and struck a mine (or was torpedoed - there is a lot of controversary on the topic) and rapidly sank. Unlike the Titanic disaster, 1036 people were resuces; although, some did die later from injuries.

gibsonrd
gibsonrd

Have heard many variations of that one, but they always miss the point. The known billionaires are just the puppets of the real council! The real council members are so rich that they don't have names that a common person would know....

Rick_from_BC
Rick_from_BC

On-line web comic titled: Into the Lair of the Megalomaniacal Money Monsters. It concerns "the nine or ten guys who secretly run everything." One of those guys runs NastySoft. 'Nough said.

Zenith545
Zenith545

You are speaking of the Bilderburg Group? This is one of many organizations that meet to discuss how the world should be, including G8, G20, international mayors & governor gatherings, etc., etc.. Some could see these as evil conpiracies, because most of the time, the "common" people have NO idea what has been said, and has very little decision-making influence. Also we have seen demonstrated many times how the "elite" or "celebrities" can be very self-serving, greedy, arrogant, etc. and are not held to the same level of accountably under a justice system as the "common" people.

Wally Bahny
Wally Bahny

That was also on my list at one point: New World Order. Unfortunately, I couldn't think of an image for it.

willy_uk
willy_uk

...the Bilderberg group. Actually I am suspicious of that group. They *do* exist (though I know not what they do) and do meet every year. Why suspicious? Because politicians who have stated they know nothing of the group and deny involvement have been videoed attending the meetings. I don't have the time to dig up the resources on that (or, to be honest, the interest) I just have the kind of memory where I hear something once and don't forget the major points. Oh, and it's more than 6 people... unless you're referring to a group other than Bilderberg.

BFilmFan
BFilmFan

You mean things like: Groups of bankers getting together and plotting ways to manipulate financial control systems to line their own pockets. Politicians that make all kinds of promises to the electorate to gether personal power and wealth. Governments using agents to ferment unrest in another nation's territory in order to accomplish their goals. Criminal organizations getting together to discuss the best ways to handle narcotics, technology and human trafficking and handling all the wealth generated from such activities. Yah, I don't believe any of those things ever happen...

azhren
azhren

Wasn't this spoofed on the Simpsons?

mr_m_sween
mr_m_sween

If words control the mind, then the following sentence must be quite dangerous. Denial in video is dependent ever because your zenith encases rotational orbits.

RudHud
RudHud

Beech Grove's Amtrak station is a great place for a secret extermination camp, for three reasons: 1. it's in the middle of Indianapolis' urbanized area; 2. it doesn't have Amtrak service; and 3. all its train lines have been taken up. Look it up on Google Maps' satellite images.

pikeman666
pikeman666

One of my Tea-Bagger associates has a looney sister who tried to start a rumor that Obama is building death camps and crematoriums for those deemed unworthy to receive medical care in the new plan. She even provided a location. It turns out it was a new county animal shelter, and it included an incinerator for euthanized animals. I think she is medicated now, or her internet service was disconnected. The emails stopped.

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

The US interstate highway system was originally build to facilite the movement of military personnel across the country in time of need. During the 'Cold War', invasion of the continental US was taken seriously, as was the need for a quick deployment to recover from nuclear bombings. I can kinda see those origins being warped into 'transport to detention' nonsense. Rail is included in the theory because that's how the German government moved their unwanted populations. I don't know how the US moved Japanese citizens to camps during WWII, but I suspect rail was also used then.

wbranch
wbranch

Alas, the train will de-rail before it ever makes it to the destination, allowing detainees to escape. Oh, the irony.

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

"The was launched on 14 February 1914..." I assume you wanted the name 'Britannic' in there somewhere. I hadn't heard the 'Not the Titanic' one before.

DaemonSlayer
DaemonSlayer

they have no country affiliation. they are neither American, Russian, German, Egyptian, or any other country's citizen. After all, the Union of all nations under one authority requires that authority to be non-partisan.

pinroot
pinroot

The Bilderbergers have become the most well known group, and there has been at least one book written on the subject (by Daniel Estulin (sp)). There is also the Trilateral Commission, The Council on Foreign Relations and The Club of Rome. Some people are members of several of these (Kissinger and Rockefeller for example). All of them are powerful people, and the "we the people" have a legitimate right to ask why these people (who are unelected and who don't answer to the people) meet in secret to create policy which affects "we the people," who have no say in any of this.

learn4ever
learn4ever

That's the group... that is indeed one of my fav's! Th group really does exist and little is known about the details. Even the locations of meetings are kept under tight wraps.

AnsuGisalas
AnsuGisalas

IF pi = 4 THEN e = pi/2 Or in layman's terms: if a pie will feed 4, then half a pie is enough for me. For the nonce.

allem
allem

Then General Eisenhower surveyed the German Autobahn and was duly impressed. He saw the advantage of having a nationwide fast road system for military transport. As president, he initiated the plan to cover the US with such roads.

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

I cringe every time I hear the name of that agency. What was wrong with 'Domestic Security' or 'National Security'? It's obviously a name chosen for maximum political impact, but it sounds too much like 'Fatherland' for my tastes.

BFilmFan
BFilmFan

I need new multifocals. I am dropping by the optometrist today!

RudHud
RudHud

... where they announce the dates and locations of their secret meetings, and the contents of their secret agendas (going all the way back to 1954). www.bilderbergmeetings.org

NickNielsen
NickNielsen

they're the ones really in charge! :p

NickNielsen
NickNielsen

All the conspiracy theorists know that somebody wants to achieve world domination and "they" are to blame. The problem is not that the conspiracists (isn't that a nice portmanteau word?) don't have someone to blame, but that no two conspiracists can agree on exactly [u]who[/u] "they" are.

AnsuGisalas
AnsuGisalas

International Order of Odd Fellows... Similar roots as the Masons... a medieval unemployment benefits network for european Templar-employed church builders. Don't get mentioned much, unlike the Masons.

AnsuGisalas
AnsuGisalas

We know you've got someone to blame for your own confusion... And I wanted to know, finally, who it is... alas.

NickNielsen
NickNielsen

I needed to verify what I already knew, so I reviewed the article before posting the last time. Over the years, I've become convinced that Tom Cochrane and Red Rider got it right when they said [i]We know you've got to blame someone For your own confusion...[/i]

AnsuGisalas
AnsuGisalas

Wikipedia says: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bilderberg Check the quote BTW, added emphasis. Wiki> Because of its secrecy and refusal to issue news releases, the group is frequently accused of political conspiracies. Critics include the John Birch Society, an American economic nationalist advocacy group,[21] Canadian writer Daniel Estulin, British writer David Icke, American writer Jim Tucker, politician Jesse Ventura and radio host Alex Jones. The Bilderberg Group was the topic of a 2009 episode of the TruTV series Conspiracy Theory with Jesse Ventura.[22] Bilderberg founding member and, for 30 years, a steering committee member, Denis Healey has said:[23] [i][b]To say we were striving for a one-world government is exaggerated, but not wholly unfair.[/i][/b] Those of us in Bilderberg felt we couldn't go on forever fighting one another for nothing and killing people and rendering millions homeless. So we felt that a single community throughout the world would be a good thing. In 2005 the then chairman Etienne Davignon discussed these accusations with the BBC. It is unavoidable and it doesn't matter. There will always be people who believe in conspiracies but things happen in a much more incoherent fashion...When people say this is a secret government of the world I say that if we were a secret government of the world we should be bloody ashamed of ourselves.[24] Before the 2001 meeting, a report in the Guardian stated: ...the press have never been allowed access and all discussions are under Chatham House rules (no quoting). Not surprisingly, such ground rules, while attracting publicity-shy financiers, have also fuelled the fantasies of conspiracy theorists.[25] Jonathan Duffy, writing in BBC News Online Magazine, states: No reporters are invited in and while confidential minutes of meetings are taken, names are not noted... In the void created by such aloofness, an extraordinary conspiracy theory has grown up around the group that alleges the fate of the world is largely decided by Bilderberg.[26] Investigative journalist Chip Berlet notes the existence of Bilderberger conspiracy theories as early as 1964, in the writings of conservative political activist Phyllis Schlafly. In Berlet's 1994 report Right Woos Left, published by Political Research Associates, he writes: The views on intractable godless communism expressed by Schwarz were central themes in three other bestselling books which were used to mobilize support for the 1964 Barry Goldwater campaign. The best known was Phyllis Schlafly's A Choice, Not an Echo, which suggested a conspiracy theory in which the Republican Party was secretly controlled by elitist intellectuals dominated by members of the Bilderberger group, whose policies would pave the way for global communist conquest.[27] G. William Domhoff, a research professor in psychology and sociology who studies theories of power, sees the role of social clubs such as Bilderberg as being nothing more than a means to create social cohesion within a power elite. He adds that those understandings of the clubs such as the Bilderberg fit with the perceptions of the members of the elite. In a 2004 interview with New Internationalist magazine, Domhoff warns progressives against getting distracted by conspiracy theories which demonize such clubs and make scapegoats of them. He argues that the opponents of progressivism are the corporate elite, the Republican Party, and conservative Democrats. It is more or less the same people who belong to clubs such as the Bilderberg, but it puts them in their most important roles, as capitalists and political leaders, which are visible.[28]

AnsuGisalas
AnsuGisalas

it's just a pr0n ring. Peckerware home party, but for big cheeses.

NickNielsen
NickNielsen

Since they meet in secret and nobody outside their circles knows what goes on in those meetings, how do you know they make policy? Another question. Since it's rarely the same group of guests at each conference, where's the continuity?

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