Hardware

Cracking open a BenQ TFT monitor

A TechRepublic member took apart his 17" BenQ TFT monitor to see what was inside. Check out his photos of the process.
TechRepublic member James Morgan recently took apart his 17" BenQ FP767-12 TFT monitor to see what was inside. What prompted the project? The front buttons on the monitor stopped working, so he couldn't turn it off or adjust the display settings, and the display was stuck on the lowest contrast setting. Although he went ahead and invested in a new widescreen monitor, he decided to open the BenQ monitor, take a look inside, and put it back together. In the process, he fixed the buttons on the front of the monitor and put it back together.

Check out the TechRepublic gallery of him cracking open his BenQ TFT monitor. (James detailed the process on his blog ...they were invisible, and he gave us permission to reprint the gallery and his captions.)

Thanks again to James for sharing these photos with the TechRepublic community.

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About

Mary Weilage is a Senior Editor for CBS Interactive. She has worked for TechRepublic since 1999.

4 comments
silicon_chip
silicon_chip

Dangerous for the unskilled . Just because it is off and unplugged ,does not mean it can't kill you. Many electronic devices still have a significant charge even days after they are switched off. I personally have seen a fellow tech kicked across the room when he slipped and touched the main capacitor in a microwave oven. The oven itself had been sitting unpowered on a shelf for over a month waiting for parts. Please everyone, do not risk your life over something like that. On a side note the 17" fp-767benq monitors tend to crack solder around the 4 small invertor transformers. This usually shows up as a screen that will flash on then go dark, or won't light up even though the power light is green. The fault in the FP-7x series is similar ,except it usually faults 2 capacitors, a pair of transistors and a surface mount fuse.

twinjenz
twinjenz

Im a bit unsure why he pulled everything apart as only the buttons were faulty and needed repairing. Was he just curious what made it work and what parts were inside.?

Dukhalion
Dukhalion

I agree about microwave ovens retaining dangerously high voltages in the capacitors, but a disconnected flat screen is harmless within a few seconds.

james.morgan
james.morgan

I have heard the same about CRT monitors and televisions, the tube retains a lot of charge for a long time, but yes the TFT is quite safe. That isn't to say that one should not be cautious. In response to the question of why take the whole thing apart to fix the buttons, the simple answer is that I wasn't actually trying to fix the buttons, I had already replaced it and just wanted to see what we inside. Fixing the buttons was an accident!

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