Nasa / Space

Geek Trivia: Cheaper by the d'oh-zen

How many times has the word 'd'oh' appeared in the dialogue of a script for The Simpsons?

In a recent paper titled "Gauge/gravity duality and meta-stable dynamical supersymmetry breaking," a group of Stanford physicists introduced a new word to the string theory lexicon: Embiggen. Quoth the paper: "We could argue that there is a competing effect which can overcome the desire of the anti-D3s to embiggen, namely their attraction towards the wrapped D5s."

While the exact meaning of that sentence is almost certainly lost on persons not trained in particle physics, the word embiggen is familiar to millions of everyday shmoes all over the planet -- but from a different context. Quoth Jebediah Springfield: "A noble spirit embiggens even the smallest man."

That line comes from "Lisa the Iconoclast," a fan-favorite episode of The Simpsons. Physicist Shamit Kachru cops to grabbing the term from the animated Simpson clan, whom he describes as "a source of knowledge for all serious theoretical physicists" (quote courtesy of Scientific American).

While the fact that embiggen isn't a real word is a minor plot point of the episode, Kachru has done his part to legitimize just one of many unofficial contributions to the English language made by Matt Groening's cartoon sitcom icons. Take, for example, kwyjibo -- a "big, dumb, balding, North American ape with no chin" -- invented on the spot by Bart Simpson to win a game of Scrabble.

Then there are yoink and meh, which are perhaps not original to The Simpsons but have nonetheless found more widespread popularity thanks to the show, coming to be accepted exclamations for expressing malicious glee (usually in response to a successful theft) and apathy, respectively. Of course, one cannot overlook okily-dokily, Ned Flanders' irritatingly upbeat over-pronunciation of okay, which has now (often ironically) entered common usage.

Still, the granddaddy of all Simpson-isms has been and always will be d'oh, Homer's trademark yelp of frustration, annoyance, and/or pain. It's the only Simpsons-popularized word ever to be included in the Oxford English Dictionary, proving that if a term appears often enough in The Simpsons, it will eventually be enshrined in the definitive authority on the English language.

So, exactly how many times has d'oh appeared in a Simpsons script?

HOW MANY TIMES HAS THE WORD D'OH APPEARED IN THE DIALOGUE OF SCRIPTS FOR THE SIMPSONS?

Get the answer.

About

Jay Garmon has a vast and terrifying knowledge of all things obscure, obtuse, and irrelevant. One day, he hopes to write science fiction, but for now he'll settle for something stranger -- amusing and abusing IT pros. Read his full profile. You can a...

25 comments
Dr. Solar
Dr. Solar

...is when the Simpsons are driving and hit a deer: H: D'oh! L: A deer! M: A female deer!

KevinTh
KevinTh

Did we really need the paper "Gauge/gravity duality and meta-stable dynamical supersymmetry breaking," to prove that embiggens is a perfectly cromulent word?

sysop-dr
sysop-dr

Shouldn't this be called 'Cheaper by the (Annoyed Grunt)-zen'? \\//_

janet.duvall
janet.duvall

love the article, one tiny comment RE: Okily dokily, its not over pronounced 'okay', its even worse, it an over pronunciation of one of my pet peeve 'Lawrence Welk' generation phrases: 'Okey Dokey', eeeuwwww.

links
links

Simpsons episodes because I had to look up cromulent to figure out what you (kevin) were talking about...*sigh* Sony AIT-1

Jay Garmon
Jay Garmon

One can only get away with so much as a mere Trivia Geek. ;)

lmatth
lmatth

Anyone who grew up watching the old one reel comedies from the early sound era starring people like Laurel & Hardy may remember "D'oh" being used in the exact same way as in THE SIMPSONS. Leon Errol also used it in his comedies. Who's to say from whence it came?

Antagonist
Antagonist

An over-pronunciation of OKAY...

HAL 9000
HAL 9000

I remember that being used in Mash many years ago when Potter gave his Official Okey Dokey on orders that he confirmed. From memory Radar was the one who forged his signature but because it had Potter's [b]Official Okey Dokey[/b] included it was accepted without question. I seem to remember that it was used off and on from when Potter first joined till the end of the series. Every time it was used was after either Radar or Klinger had forged Potters signature. Col

Locrian_Lyric
Locrian_Lyric

The David Lee Roth video "Yankee doodle Rose"?

wbchaney
wbchaney

Maybe the writers should have called this episode Old Mc(Annoyed Grunt)-nald!

Antagonist
Antagonist

You should get your eyesite checked, it clearly says E-I-E-I-(Annoyed Grunt)... Read again...

HAL 9000
HAL 9000

Silly boy you left yourself wide open for that one didn't you? More importantly as you are the Official Script Writer for [b]The Simpson's[/b] what are you doing posting to TR when you should be working. :0 Col

johnpall
johnpall

The Simpsons, the show that teaches kids to use slingshots.

Styopa
Styopa

It was the catch phrase of James Finlayson, Laurel and Hardy's squinting Scottish stooge in many of their Hal Roach films. Wikipedia claims (without evidence) that Castellaneta acknowledged Finlayson as his model for the phrase: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jimmy_Finlayson

Jay Garmon
Jay Garmon

Castellaneta actually used the longer "D'ooooooohhhh!" that Errol was known for on his earlier takes, but the voice director had him cut it down in length to punch up the timing. But for space, I would have brought this up in the article. OED (as said in the article) dates "d'oh" to common usage at least as early as 1945, but cites The Simpsons as popularizing the term.

imahockeymom
imahockeymom

Did you READ the original article??? You're arguing over who started the use of "okey dokey" when that phrase is NOWHERE in this article: ================== Of course, one cannot overlook okily-dokily, Ned Flanders? irritatingly upbeat over-pronunciation of okay, which has now (often ironically) entered common usage. ================== OKILY-DOKILY is not the same phrase as OKEY-DOKEY. I've watched a bazillion M*A*S*H episodes and I've never heard any of the M*A*S*H characters say okILy-dokILy.

bqeted
bqeted

This term has been widely used in australia for over 100 years of more im sure!! My dad used it as a boy and he was born in 1906

faradhi
faradhi

on a forged letter. I don't remember Radar using it. Klinger was sore because Potter made him take down his Lebanese decorations (Which potter called his arabian Nightmares) from the office. He decided to go AWOL and forged a letter that Potter gave his "Official Okey Dokey on this man's adious" Klinger was going to become Sphen Laungren (probably misspelled) I am a M*A*S*H geek and watch it almost nightly. --Edited to add arabian nightmares and some other minor modifications that added clarity without significantly changing the meaning of any statement.

Jay Garmon
Jay Garmon

...after Leon called me out. Consider this a preview of a future quibble.

faradhi
faradhi

Second. Your right that no one in M*A*S*H has used the Ned Flanders version of Okey - Dokey with the L. However, the version without the L was used quite a few times. I pointed out two episodes. Third, since you are new here, you may not have noticed that many threads take on a life of their own and rarely end up on the same topic that was started. The Okey Dokey conversation was not started in the article. It was started by janet.duvall@ who quibbled that the Ned version was not an over pronouncement of Okay but Okey Dokey. Then HAL mentioned the crew from M*A*S*H and then I stepped in and added my 2 cents worth. (which is over priced) Finally, if you seriously question my knowledge of M*A*S*H, I will just have to challenge you to a duel using all 11 Seasons of M*A*S*H that I have on DVD. Or at least throw the old Columbia House VHS tapes at you. :D

HAL 9000
HAL 9000

It's been a very long time since I originally saw MASH and I can remember seeing at the very least Radar and Klinger using those words. To make matters even worse I wasn't even a regular viewer of the show when it first aired and am relying on memory of the ones that I did see. When NASH originally aired here you had the choice of watching MASH or Dr Who and I generally chose the latter when it was on. So I didn't even see the majority of the shows broadcast. Besides where is the fun in not finding something to [b]Nit Pick Over?[/b] Now as punishment you have to hire all the Episodes of MASH and watch them from the beginning to end of the series. :^0 Col

faradhi
faradhi

The episode above, and one where he makes Major Winchester say okey dokey are the ones I remember. I am sure there were more.

HAL 9000
HAL 9000

As it's been a very long time since I've seen Mash and I was just going from Memory but I did remember it being used several Times in Mash. Col

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