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Geek Trivia: What descendant game of chess was designed specifically to stifle artificial intelligence?

What descendant game of chess -- played with all the same pieces on a standard chess board -- is specifically designed to be difficult for computers, even supercomputers, to play?

This week's quibble comes from the July 17, 2007 edition of Geek Trivia, which asked what was the first variant version of chess ever played by a computer?

Member The Pro from Dover quibbled with the assertion that Deep Blue beat Garry Kasparov:

"The rules were bent and broken to enable Deep Blue to win,"There were considerable delays in Deep Blue's responses, some that were so long that a human in tournament play would have been declared a forfeit.

"In one of the games Deep Blue had the functional equivalent of a nervous breakdown. The operators were allowed to debug it and reprogram portions of the machine, which then (and only then) came back to defeat Kasparov.

"There were so many rules of chess and chess competition broken, circumvented and ignored during the matches against Deep Blue that it is surprising that Gary[sic] Kasparov did not have a nervous breakdown, or at least a major temper tantrum. If you exclude all of the 'do overs' that Deep Blue was allowed, Kasparov defeated the machine handily."

I don't declare the victors, I just regurgitate the details of the victories. Thanks for the challenge flag, though, and keep those quibbles coming!

About

Jay Garmon has a vast and terrifying knowledge of all things obscure, obtuse, and irrelevant. One day, he hopes to write science fiction, but for now he'll settle for something stranger -- amusing and abusing IT pros. Read his full profile. You can a...

5 comments
joethejet
joethejet

Well, The other advantage Watson had was no synapse delay in pressing the button. If you built in a physical delay in pushing the button I'm not so sure the computer would have won.

gilesjerrit
gilesjerrit

Those needn't have spent all that time inventing a new game of chess. They should have challenged IBM to a game of Chessboxing.

TomMerritt
TomMerritt

One thing I noticed while watching Watson play Jeopardy!: If the question was basically a "lookup", then Ken and Brad didn't stand a chance. If a question, however, involved some "roundabout" thinking, the boys often beat Watson. I don't remember a specific question per se, but a question something like "Is verifiable and sounds like the area above the horizon" might do. It was fascinating to watch Watson crank around potential answers, but one of the boys was usually right on it. We haven't quite been replaced yet. It's TRUE!

andrew232006
andrew232006

because I have no idea what "Is verifiable and sounds like the area above the horizon" means.

TomMerritt
TomMerritt

Maybe that example was a bit convoluted. I couldn't remember a "real" example. TRUE (Sounds like "blue", right?). My bad, but my point was that the questions where you had to follow several trains of thought were where Ken and Brad kicked Watson's virtual butt.