After Hours

My first comic book: What got you hooked?

Further evidence that the geek revolution is upon us, <em>Entertainment Weekly</em> asks 15 of the topic comic book creators working today what classic funnybook got them hooked on the medium. The Trivia Geek counters with his own first comics encounter. It gets dorky from there.

Fantastic Four #1Further evidence that the geek revolution is upon us, Entertainment Weekly asks 15 of the topic comic book creators working today what classic funnybook got them hooked on the medium. Fantastic Four #1 makes a couple of appearances on the list--which dates some of the creators, as it came out in 1961.

I was much later to the game. I got hooked on Starman #5, written by Roger Stern and illustrated by Tom Lyle, which hits stands in November of 1988. (I actually bought it at a convenience store, back when such places had comics racks. Of course, back then, comics were only $1, and the three Superman titles were only 75 cents.) It was a tie-in issue with the Invasion! crossover event spanning DC Comics that year, written by Keith Giffen and illustrated by a pre-Spawn Todd McFarlane. Starman #5 had superheroes fighting a massive 1950s sci-fi style fleet of alien soldiers and warships, and name-dropped about 50 characters, places, and events (or so it seemed). I was immediately sucked into the action and sought out the expansive storyline, which led me to collecting three Superman titles, Justice League International, and a host of other books, along with Starman. Twenty years later, I'm still a fanboy.

As for the famous people, Brian Michael Bendis (who writes about a third of all Marvel Comics these days) was an FF #1 guy. Jim Lee (the all time X-Men artist) was a Tarzan guy. Bestselling novelist, TV producer, and comic scribe Brad Meltzer got snagged by Justice League #150. Warren Ellis (novelist, TV writer, comic writer, Web icon) can't remember, which isn't surprising.

So, for you fellow fanboys (and girls) out there, what comic got you hooked? Don't be afraid, it's okay to share.

About

Jay Garmon has a vast and terrifying knowledge of all things obscure, obtuse, and irrelevant. One day, he hopes to write science fiction, but for now he'll settle for something stranger -- amusing and abusing IT pros. Read his full profile. You can a...

42 comments
rob123q
rob123q

For me it was Spider-man, I really got hooked during the Green Goblin / Death of Gwen stacy issues and then the Jackel clone saga, the start when Professor Warren first cloned Gwen, not the later issues with Kane which were great also. The whole idea of cloning was mind blowing (not to mention a great way for the comic industry to bring back people from the dead). Now, over 5,000 comics later, I am still hooked on the older Marvel issues.

noux
noux

Best comics!

yodi.collins
yodi.collins

Was an issue of the Uncanny X-Men with an image of Ms. Marvel/Binary on the cover. I have never looked back.

Thomas907
Thomas907

I learned to read from a Comic Book. Superman in the 1930's - Ten Cents. Yes, the only reason I read and write today is because of the Comic Book!

Ursus Horribilis
Ursus Horribilis

My first comicbook was X-men #32 - Beware the Juggernaut, My Son! It was first published in May 1967. A friend of mine brought it from a book store in May 1977 (for $1) and thought that I would be interested in it. I was!

spdragoo
spdragoo

The first comic book I ever owned was one that, IIRC, was included with the local newspaper back when I was a kid. I haven't been able to find info about it since then, but the primary story surrounded Superman & Spider-Man against Dr. Doom and The Parasite, with Wonder Woman & The Incredible Hulk making appearances as well. I also had a special edition book that included the first 5 or 10 issues of the FF in a single book. Before that, though, I used to read comics that my uncle had (a lot of Silver Age Green Lanterns, as well as some of the old Tales from the Crypt types). As far as serious collecting, though, I didn't get into that until college. I think I still have some of my old Captain America & "What If...?" comics, although I also had a few DC as well. Like some others have said, I never really played the "DC vs. Marvel" game -- although most of my collection has been Marvel-based, I mainly collected characters that I liked, regardless of who published them.

rob123q
rob123q

I guess the Comic books that got me started with the Superhero side of comics was Spider-man and the Fantastic Four. I started reading these in the early 70's and really became involved around the mid 70's when The Thing lost his powers and Reed made him an ExoSkeleton suit to wear. This was when Luke Cage stepped in and took Ben's place.this is also the time frame when I got hooked on Spider-man, around the time when Doc Ock returned and HammerHead was killed and turned into a ghost, not to forget the SpiderMobile! This was around the time the Clone issues were starting with Spider-mans clone dying (or so it seemed) and Spider-man dropping him into a Smoke Stack to dispose of the body. The stories and the Art were second to none at that time. I still collect the Spider-man issues, having all the Amazing Spider-man issues from 9 to present. My current collection includes all titles from the 50's, 60's and 70's, with a total of around 6,000 comics. But if it was not for Stan Lee and Steve Ditko, I would have never been the comic geek I am today.

Wild Card
Wild Card

For a long time that was the only title I cared about. Then I started getting into JLA, JSA, Booster Gold, The Crisis'. Big mistake, they are just taking up room now.

stormbringerPA
stormbringerPA

I know we're talking about the stone ages here, but I remember watching the Hulk, Spider Man and the rest on TV in the 60s. But the first comic: Iron Man. No magic radiation, no extraterrestrial origin. Just a wounded man in a suit of mechanized, transistorized armor. Lord was I a science geekling back then.

osurickbee
osurickbee

I was 6-7 years old during the Adam West/Batman original run, so therefore my first comic was of course Batman. Also the Saturday morning TV version of Spider-Man ("does whatever a spider can") so that was a no brainer as well! DC had it going on then with the "go-go" checkerboard and all, but Marvel rocked!

Oz_Media
Oz_Media

You know, Rupert, Rupert the Bear, everyone knows his name. I used to get his annuals for Christmas each year. As for comic books, Spiderman et al, I never really got into comic books. I was busy reading teen novels (Hardy Boys type of stuff, though not specifically Hard Boys). I did start collecting comics at oen time though, never read them but just bought and stored them. Had a friend who's older brother was heavily into collecting, my friend was learnign teh trade and i got into it. Had another friend years later who ran a comic store and used record/book store, I ended up trading them in for a bunch of fairly rare LP's, which I still have. Oh, I did read an Archie comic once while in the barber shop though, if that counts.

tronman
tronman

R. Crumb Zap Comix #1, still have it. And almost every Ralph Snart comic book ever published.

dave
dave

Always admired Russ Mannings great artwork and I thought the character was more believable than the other superheroes.

jkiernan
jkiernan

http://www.supermanhomepage.com/images/comic-covers/Pre-Crisis-Covers/1974/adv273s-tb.html This is the first comic I remember reading. It's not the one that drove me to reading comics on a continual basis though. That would be Marvel Team-Up and later Marvel Two-In-One. The interaction and attitudes of Marvel characters back in those days (mid-1970's) was unparalleled by DC. Having supporting characters appear in different books linked the whole universe and was a brilliant marketing tactic to encourage the purchase of every title published. Over at DC during that time, Batman was well into his O'Neil/Adams retooling as a darker character, and I was surprised to see that he wasn't as inept or childish as the TV show and cartoons. When I first read the Ra's and Talia stories, I got hooked into the Batman mythos as well. That must have been in the late 1970's because I had bought them as back issues at a comic convention. I don't buy into the concept that comic books are geeky. Reading them at such a young age like I did encourages literacy and develops interactive social skills when meeting with fellow enthusiasts.

paul_allard
paul_allard

In my case, it was Amazing Spider-Man Annual #2 (I think) with Doctor Strange. I got hooked on the humour that was regularly thrown in.

chibibarako
chibibarako

For me, it was a Thor comic published in the mid- to late-seventies (Loki was wearing that green thing with the helmet with the huge gold horns). I don't know issue number as the cover had been torn off (garage sale!) and all I remember of the plot was that at the end Loki had been struck blind and run off a cliff. I was already interested in Norse mythology, and this gave me another way to explore it. Thor led me to the Avengers, which led me to Dr. Strange, which led me to the X-Men (not the bumblebee costumes, the group right after). I was there for the start of the New Mutants and Alpha Flight, and the whole run of the "original" 1980s Defenders.

Mogloth
Mogloth

You know damn well what comic book got me started Trivia Geek. You gave it to me. Birds of Prey.

tOOllOOt
tOOllOOt

When I was kid my grandmother would take me to the commissary and let me get a comic. It seems my cousins must have trashed them because a few years later when I was more into comics and I went to visit my grandmother all I could find was a Batman and a Star Wars comic. But, Wolverine was a big draw for me into the comic world. I bought others such as Spiderman and some Image comics but Wolverine was my fav.

jdclyde
jdclyde

When I was about 6 I had a stack of them given to me. There were some "scary" ones (that later became movies decades later) and then there were the funnies like sadsack and hotstuff. From there, my addiction spread to Xmen, Avengers, Defenders, LOSH, Firestorm, bluedevil, nova, sarg rock, the champions, [i] (this is getting sad) [/i] ghost rider, spiderman, FF, Arion, John Carter The Warlord of Mars, Son Of Saton, Dethlok...... Having to wait a whole month between issues was unbareable, so I was always checking out something new. Of course, having an older brother, they are all mostly in poor condition. :( But at least I Still have them! :) Biggest comic book mistake was buying the collectors pack of the death of superman. got one for each of my boys, but forgot to buy a third, so I could open it and know what happened!!!!! Have had them for about 14 years, and still don't know what happened.

JamesRL
JamesRL

I read them in the late 60s, the "silver" age, when I got 25 cents a week allowance and I could buy a comic and a bag of chips. Spiderman, Superman and Batman were on TV, but the comics really grabbed me more than the TV. My son is a Marvel kid too... James

NotSoChiGuy
NotSoChiGuy

It was what every boy in my class was talking about for the better part of a school year. Today, the only comics I have left are Secret Wars I and II, a collection of the original 'What Ifs' and the first 10 Todd MacFarlane Spider-Mans. With the way the economy is going, probably the only things I will be able to will to my kids. I've picked up a few graphic novels here and there (most recently the Dark Tower: Gunslinger Born)...but since they are novels, they don't count! ;)

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

I can remember stuff two years prior to JLA 98 (mid-'70's? 12 cents?), but don't not by title or number. I wasn't a serious collector at that time and was strictly a DC reader. There were several years when I didn't read comics at all. I remember X-Men 101 getting me started seriously around 1979 or so. I quit collecting and sold my collection (2000+ books) when I got married; it made the down payment on our first house. At that time I was picking up 30 or so titles monthly. I took another look at some books in the early 1990's (Image, Marvel's "2099" line, DC's Image line, and other non-mainstream books) but couldn't get the fire back. I haven't even looked at a comic since 2000; they've gotten too dark (and too expensive). Edited: I have one book left: X-Men #137. Amazing the impact this and the subsequent "Days of Future Past" issues continue to have on the Marvel continuum.

artsohc
artsohc

While driving with my dad from Southern California to Alaska I picked up Superman #74, the comic book that first featured Superman meeting Doomsday and eventually led to Superman #75, the Death of Superman. Ended up purchasing the next 150 or so Superman comics.

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

Is that the one where Rogue leached off Ms. M's powers?

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

Many will evaluate your collection and make a better offer than you'd get selling them in bulk on Craig's List.

michael.biddulph
michael.biddulph

Can't remember but I do know that at the tender age of 14 I had hundreds including many No. 1s - when I think of what they'd be worth today if I still had them!!! Makes me regret the follies of youth - more or less gave them away.. Michael

cmccabe
cmccabe

When i went to the dentist my dad used to bribe me to be good be going to the comic store and letting me pick up the newest issue of transformers and G.I. joe. Now i read most of the bat family, and alot of the dc world marvels just gone down hill even thought i still read the x titles.

Dumphrey
Dumphrey

with the help of Gleep and the Wonder twins (Gleeps side kicks). Gleep used a tritium banana (Sears, $12.95)to "jump start" superman's life force again... what the comic failed to show was HOW Gleep had to use the banana. Anyway, it lead to the Super Man Marries Gleep mini.

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

The Legion hasn't been worth looking at since "Iron" Mike Grell left the book. They've been retconned more than the Bush administration's excuse for invading Iraq.

jdclyde
jdclyde

marvel vs dc. they each had some good ones and they each had ones that sucked ass. because we didn't have a TV in the house from the time I was 9 till I moved out on my own and we were to poor to have video games (atari), I read a lot. recently dug out my old hardyboys books for my boys, and wow, is the writing dated. "gee joe, what happened?". Yeah, real keen.... :) Wonder if they have any value?

jim_vander_noot
jim_vander_noot

Got hooked at summer camp with the Kryptonite Kid issue and several other stories. Didn't tap into Marvel until a few years later.

maecuff
maecuff

When I was a little kid, I used to read Little LuLu, The Archies, Richie Rich..stuff like that, but really, never picked up another comic book. Until around a year ago. Joss Whedon continued the Buffy series in comic book form and I've been reading those.

Dumphrey
Dumphrey

it was a natural extension to my Mad Magazine fetish... Mostly I went for the very dark or humorous, with occasional jaunts into X territory when I wanted. But I would have to say my favorite of all times is The Sand Man.

jdclyde
jdclyde

when they hit $1.50 and up, while getting shorter, I walked away. This from someone that started collecting when they were JUST moving from .25 to .30 per issue. I also HATED when comics started going through the artsy-fartsy phase. (new mutants) of course a few to add to the list was green lantern/arrow and black lightning. I am going to have to bust open my trunk that I have them in. it is buried in the back of my closet.

Dumphrey
Dumphrey

and Nancy Drew as well (how many of those you have JD?). What caught my eye was they are using the SAME covers as on the ones I inherited from my Aunt when I was little, so 40 years with no new artwork... That's a good return on the original investment.

faradhi
faradhi

Was a favorite of mine. That brings me back. I am googling it now. I feel a new avatar coming on. Thanks Dumphrey :D

Dumphrey
Dumphrey

I am so jealous. I will now go kick myself in the pants for not thinking to do that..

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