After Hours

My first comic book: What got you hooked?

Further evidence that the geek revolution is upon us, <em>Entertainment Weekly</em> asks 15 of the topic comic book creators working today what classic funnybook got them hooked on the medium. The Trivia Geek counters with his own first comics encounter. It gets dorky from there.

Fantastic Four #1Further evidence that the geek revolution is upon us, Entertainment Weekly asks 15 of the topic comic book creators working today what classic funnybook got them hooked on the medium. Fantastic Four #1 makes a couple of appearances on the list—which dates some of the creators, as it came out in 1961.

I was much later to the game. I got hooked on Starman #5, written by Roger Stern and illustrated by Tom Lyle, which hits stands in November of 1988. (I actually bought it at a convenience store, back when such places had comics racks. Of course, back then, comics were only $1, and the three Superman titles were only 75 cents.) It was a tie-in issue with the Invasion! crossover event spanning DC Comics that year, written by Keith Giffen and illustrated by a pre-Spawn Todd McFarlane. Starman #5 had superheroes fighting a massive 1950s sci-fi style fleet of alien soldiers and warships, and name-dropped about 50 characters, places, and events (or so it seemed). I was immediately sucked into the action and sought out the expansive storyline, which led me to collecting three Superman titles, Justice League International, and a host of other books, along with Starman. Twenty years later, I'm still a fanboy.

As for the famous people, Brian Michael Bendis (who writes about a third of all Marvel Comics these days) was an FF #1 guy. Jim Lee (the all time X-Men artist) was a Tarzan guy. Bestselling novelist, TV producer, and comic scribe Brad Meltzer got snagged by Justice League #150. Warren Ellis (novelist, TV writer, comic writer, Web icon) can't remember, which isn't surprising.

So, for you fellow fanboys (and girls) out there, what comic got you hooked? Don't be afraid, it's okay to share.

About

Jay Garmon has a vast and terrifying knowledge of all things obscure, obtuse, and irrelevant. One day, he hopes to write science fiction, but for now he'll settle for something stranger — amusing and abusing IT pros. Read his full profile. You can a...

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