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Photo Galleries: Best of 2009

TechRepublic Photo Galleries reveal aspects of information technology that words simply cannot. The Top 5 of 2009 trend toward the fanciful.

While it may often be cliché to say that a picture is worth a thousand words, it is also often the truth. The TechRepublic Photo Galleries show information technology from a different perspective and reveal aspects that words cannot describe with great enough detail.

The Top 5 most popular Photo Galleries in 2009 explore the more fanciful and fun-loving side of information technology and the professionals who live it every day. No matter whether you enjoy sleek notebooks or people dressed in costume or something in between, you are bound to find at least one gallery that will appeal to your sense of humor.

Photo galleries

Cracking Open the Dell Adamo

Dell hopes to take a little air out of Apple's sails with the Adamo. This upscale laptop packs a lot of tech into a stylish, ultrathin package. But, it's going to cost you. Our $1,999 model includes a 1.2GHz Intel Core 2 Duo Processor, 2GB 800MHz DDR3 dual-channel memory, 128GB solid state drive, and 13.4-inch 16:9 WLED display. In a special partnership with iFixit, TechRepublic brings you this gallery of the cracking open process.

Weird Error Messages

When something goes wrong in Windows, you would hope that the error message dialog box would contain some helpful information to assist you in finding the solution to the problem. Unfortunately, that's not always the case. In fact, sometimes the error messages are downright confusing or at the very least, simply weird. In this gallery, created by Greg Shultz, we'll take a look at 24 confusing or weird error messages.

Cracking open the Sony PlayStation 3

Once the initial launch rush died down, we were able to finally buy a Sony PlayStation 3. After taking it for a test drive, I began the surprisingly easy disassembly process. Come along as we go inside the PS3 and see the hardware that makes Sony's $599 console tick. Bill Detwiler created this gallery in 2007, but it still draws a slew of visitors wanting to know just what makes this thing tick.

Cracking Open the Apple iPhone 3G

Apple's iPhone 3G arrived with a bevy of new enterprise-ready features, including Exchange support, business-grade security, and third-party applications powered by an SDK. As with the first iPhone, we waited in line, bought our phone, signed an AT&T contract, and promptly began to crack open the case. Come along as we disassemble the Apple iPhone 3G. Also, we always disassembled our gadgets with the intent to reassemble them. The iPhone 3G was no exception. It worked when we put it back together.

The Apple iPhone 3G from 2008 was more popular than the Cracking Open the Apple iPhone 3G S that we created for 2009.

Comic-Con 2009: The geeks dress up to meet the stars

Check out the wild and wacky attendees at this year's Comic-Con International convention held in San Diego, CA. Our Comic-Con 2009 gallery features fans in costumes, zombies, celebrities, and collectibles. People being silly and doing while dressed in costumes is always a popular gallery.

Additional galleries

My personal favorite was the gallery that I made of me avenging an earlier defeat in the Cracking Open lab, Repair the cracked glass face of an Apple iPhone 3G. I was disappointed with myself when I cracked the glass faceplate cracking open this phone originally. I was relieved that I could redeem myself by showing how to replace the faceplate (which is not easy) for all to see.

What is your favorite TechRepublic Photo Gallery?

TechRepublic's Photo Galleries newsletter, delivered every Tuesday, features photos and videos of IT news stories, our "cracking open" experiments, step-by-step instructions, and software screenshots. Automatically sign up today!

About Mark Kaelin

Mark W. Kaelin has been writing and editing stories about the IT industry, gadgets, finance, accounting, and tech-life for more than 25 years. Most recently, he has been a regular contributor to BreakingModern.com, aNewDomain.net, and TechRepublic.

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