Microsoft

Pic: Vista error = logic puzzle


vista_error.JPG

Another entry in the Is it Vista or is it Photoshop? series of inane system error messages, this time taking the form of a bizarre logic loop worthy of  the Gordian Knot. As usual, the fact that this is plausible is indictment enough. (Found via reddit.)

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Jay Garmon has a vast and terrifying knowledge of all things obscure, obtuse, and irrelevant. One day, he hopes to write science fiction, but for now he'll settle for something stranger -- amusing and abusing IT pros. Read his full profile. You can a...

12 comments
chaneys
chaneys

I once had a message that instructed me to insert the driver floppy into the PCMCIA modem. :-)

HypnoToad72
HypnoToad72

In an Active Directory domain, try creating a local user account. Windows states you can't create the user account because the user account doesn't exist. Well duh... Microsoft logic(tm). Please leave home without it. ((Except that didn't happen under Vista. That happened under XP on a Server 2003 R2 domain...))

djamieson
djamieson

I understand it. It seems a little wordy, but the essence is not totally confusing. I wouldn't give it gordian knot status that's for sure. :-p

The Scummy One
The Scummy One

How do you assign yourself permissions when you cant view the permissions page? LOL

Neon Samurai
Neon Samurai

Ok, maybe that was a bad joke but I couldn't resist.

The Scummy One
The Scummy One

he would throw the Windows box on the floor (accidentally of course....).

david.terry
david.terry

I forwarded this to my network staff for a little laugh and this is what I got back from my network administrator: "That is indeed a bonafide error message, and is NOT Photoshop. You get it in Vista when you are drilling into the permissions of a file folder when you are logged in with Administrator level permissions, but that particular account has not been explicitly given rights, either directly, or through inheritance, to that folder. So?.the logic goes, you cannot view the folder permissions (because you don?t currently have permission), BUT since you are an Administrator, you can, of course, grant those permissions to yourself. The reason it doesn?t do this automatically is because 1) the act could break something else, and 2) a long time ago everyone complained to Microsoft about them ?automatically? deciding what is best for someone?s IT environment?so the stopped it and said ?now if you want it to happen, you have to do it yourself.? " Just thought I would share that with the community. David Terry Programmer/Analyst Hickory Farms, Inc. www.hickoryfarms.com

MikeGall
MikeGall

Every once and a while when logged in as root, when I try to do a chown -Rf username:group nothing changes. if I do it without the -f I get cannot change owner errors. The funny thing though is the files were created as root, but the user and group are nobody nobody (this is a Solaris 9 system). The windows issue actually makes sense, unless the administrator really needs to do something in a folder even they shouldn't have rights. It is at least another hurtle (admittedly a small one) for a hacker to get in the system). Since it is throwing a UAC dialog, I suspect that a scripted hack tool would have issues (have to get the dialog handle somehow, which would probably cause further UAC errors).

michaels.perry
michaels.perry

It's the dreadful wording that is the problem. Just how bad is the education these days when they can't make a sentence means something that users can understand? Typical of the way developers write prose.

kirenl
kirenl

Agreed. Perhaps MS developers should reference the MS Manual of Style for Technical Publications... lol Also, one would think that would have been caught in product testing. It's ridiculous.

Wally Bahny
Wally Bahny

That makes sense. The way it works in XP is that it tells you you don't have access. But, if you go into the permissions, you can reset the permissions and/or grant yourself permissions. This message is a little more accurate, just not worded well.

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