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Poll: The greatest sci-fi film of all time (isn't Star Wars)


Star Wars is no longer the most popular science fiction film ever made, at least according to a recent poll conducted by British science fiction magazine SFX (and reported by the BBC). While the floundering of George Lucas' ubiquitous science fantasy franchise isn't necessarily a surprise--at least not to anyone who saw any of the three prequel films--the new king of the geek mountaintop is turning heads: Serenity. A mildly successful, mid-budget sci-fi Western based on a TV show that was cancelled after a dozen or so episodes in 2002 is now the preferred SF flick of Brit fandom? What in the name of the Hollywood blockbuster is going on here?

Before we dig too deep into the analysis here, the poll only had about 3,000 respondents, and they put some rather suspicious candidates into the Top Ten finalists. (Back to the Future? Seriously?) Below is SFX's final top ten, in order. You can, however, vote for your favorite on the list, and we'll see exactly how much TR has in common with that particular slice of science fiction fans.

About

Jay Garmon has a vast and terrifying knowledge of all things obscure, obtuse, and irrelevant. One day, he hopes to write science fiction, but for now he'll settle for something stranger -- amusing and abusing IT pros. Read his full profile. You can a...

184 comments
jverhei
jverhei

That's because "Deep Thought" processed it through. Have Towel - Will Travel !

slksport
slksport

Highly imaginative, visually stunning, not the usual juvenile junk. Seems like lately TV has gotten sci fi (or at least the hard tech version) better than the movies have - Firefly, the new Galactica, there were even some episodes of Enterprise that were more imaginative than the stuff you see at the Cineplex (Carbon Creek, the mirror universe episode).

michael.laborde
michael.laborde

The originals of "Invasion of the Body Snatchers", "The Invisible Man", and "Metropolis" and "When Worlds Collide" and "Destination Moon" and "The Thing from Another World".

NBI Computers Services
NBI Computers Services

I wonder why this one did not make the list. this one is one of the greatest films ever and if you don't think so then you... can try to kill me with a fork lift...

longwayoff
longwayoff

Soylent Green - ok, it's icky, but it's science fiction icky...

checkerbarn
checkerbarn

Especially considering what they had to work with technologically and conceptually at that time! Gotta admit though, watched Blade Runner quite a few more times!

voyagertec
voyagertec

I have a few right up top, but this one was done excellent as a story and special effects. I like the original also by H.G. Wells, but this is one of the few remakes that excells. My other favorites are Fifth Element, Aliens, Preditor and Blade Runner.

goofproof1945
goofproof1945

The Best of the Litter was left out. The Best is the Babylon 5 series & Movies, how quick they forget, what started Si Fi for me wasm War of the Worlds, and the best done movie was Forbidden Planet. Live Long and Prosper! "Goofproof"

koebelin
koebelin

I don't know why I have such a hard time convincing people S.T. is the finest achievement in SF, when it has everything, creepy monsters, cool effects, lots of action, and a wicked sense of parody. Maybe people don't really like parody.

rkoenn
rkoenn

I would have included Close Encounters of the Third Kind. A bit ground breaking at its' time and even slightly plausible. Kind of interesting take on the UFO thing and dealing with personalities while being kind of a wondrous, innocent thing at the end. Not the number one but IMHO, in the top 10. While I find some of the horror movies and fantasy movies done with a scifi motif to be very enjoyable and fun, I would not truly rate them scifi. I agree with the Logan's Run entry though.

ang2006
ang2006

I have always liked the Star Trek Movies although the first was not one of my favorites. The rest were well done and believable.

cl0729
cl0729

Others that are very close, IMO: Star Trek II, Blade Runner, Babylon 5: In the Beginning, and The Adventures of Buckaroo Banzai. And remember: no matter where you go, there you are! >:-)

wcallahan
wcallahan

Far and away the best Sci-Fi ever. Gort, Klaatu barada nikto

crowleyj
crowleyj

Metropolis by Fritz Lang Things to Come with Raymond Massey The Day the Earth Stood Still and Earth vs the Fyling Saucer how about THX1138 ?

makwolven
makwolven

Alien.. still stands up.. Ridley Scott is a genius who paints a future based on human behavior that is timeless.... greed, greed and more corporate greed. The emergence of a real female character defying conventional pulp fiction was also the film's greatest asset. Kubrick, great but a little slow for my tastes.. blade runner a great 1a and Forbidden Planet a visionairy piece.. how about " The Day the Earth Stood Still"? Gort Klatu Mirada Nicto!

cmorgante
cmorgante

Which Planet of the Apes - the version in the 70's or the one in the 90's?

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

Two categories - color, and black and white. B&W - "Night of the Lepus" - "giant" rabbits with ketchup "blood" on their faces run over bad miniature sets and DeForest Kelley. No explanation of how their size change also rendered them carnivorous. Some desert scenes intercut with forested terrain. Watchable, in an MST3K kind of way. Color - "Sky Captain and the World of Tomorrow" - Beautiful but stupid. The intrepid girl photographer is trapped in a uranium mine for several hours, then later develops crystal clear photos from film in the camera she carried. The evil scientist's work is being carried out by his robots without any assistance or outside world interference, until they start capturing his colleagues for no disclosed reason, unnecessarily disclosing their formerly secret existance. Lots of similar plot holes you could drive a robotic spaceship / ark through, including the evil scientist's robotic spaceship / ark that wouldn't be needed if he wasn't destroying the world's resources to build it. But it gorgeous; watch it with the sound off so it doesn't insult your intelligence.

cubeslave
cubeslave

I still haven't perfected that technique of falling toward the ground and missing.

tcheche
tcheche

I still watch this movie about once a year. I think that it is mostly a reminiscense from my childhood. But I still enjoy it.

tom
tom

For any of us over 50 this has to be a defining moment in our movie watching experience. If you liked it, you wanted more of the same, if you didn't then science ficti0on wasn't for you. I loved it then and I still watch it if it comes on TV

Tony Hopkinson
Tony Hopkinson

I enjoyed the second one more in some respects, truer to the spirit. However as usual Hollywood is geographically challenged and set's it in the wrong country. Nobody has done the naval battle either.

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

There wasn't a bit of parody in the original. This is another movie I declined to see because I didn't see how the book could translate. Heinlein had lots of discussion on the obligations of citizenship that I expect were left out. Did they chop out all the officer training portions? They were pretty heavy too.

cubeslave
cubeslave

If they had had the special effects, and didn't have the censorship. Even though it tosses out the main themes and most of the story of the book. In spirit, it has more to do with Heinlein than Total Recall, or Freejack have to do with their inspirations. I would really like to see some independent producer make a version that is faithful to the origional work.

Tony Hopkinson
Tony Hopkinson

Military SF novels. spawning, Pournelle, Weber, Flint, Drake .... The film was awful, should have called it Them II, naff all to do with the original idea.

jeasterlingtech
jeasterlingtech

Troopers was the second most poorly written screen play the writer skimmed a badly written clift note and lost all the real impact of the novel (the worse was a miniseries about Noah the writer I believe never even saw a bible) star wars was science fiction movie written by a science imbecile the greats are usually great scientist asimov forward, and others or great researcher mcaffrie moon or webber

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

Theory: only the even-numbered Trek movies are worth watching.

kaltwasserwr
kaltwasserwr

Serenity was a unique perspective on SciFi as far as I'm concerned, and I would love to see a return to TV or the big screen. It offered well defined characters and didn't rely on all the gee whiz tech to tell a story, As for Star Trek II, That is a VERY close second.....

rrwitham
rrwitham

I agree. See my reply above in this list.

andrew.siegel
andrew.siegel

Finally someone mentions Metropolis - a true Classic. I do have to say that Dune the miniseries was a lot better than the 1st, but yes, it fell way short of the book. And as a HUGE Douglas Adams fan, Hitchhikers definately falls into that category as well... amazing book - poor movie.

longwayoff
longwayoff

Amazon Women on the Moon ...speaking of Barbarella-ish

xljohnr
xljohnr

The name says it all.

systemsgod
systemsgod

I didnt even see this one...the previews (with aliens singing "Louie Louie") looked way too awful to even check this out on video. Why must they make such garbage?

Dr_Bill
Dr_Bill

A movie you've got to see is "The Creeping Terror". MST3000 did it, but you can get it straight if you try hard enough. It makes Plan 9 look like Oscar material. You'll laugh til it hurts. I liked all of the movies on the list, but none could be called the best. What about THX1138 and The Day the Earth Stood Still?

Bill Ward
Bill Ward

KCfOS is my nominee for worst. BTW, Sky Captain is RETRO SciFi; it was never meant to be a serious plot, just a riff on the 1930s and 1940s serials. Same reason I won't nominate Flash Gordon (besides it's great soundtrack from Queen).

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

I'd like to retract my nomination of "Sky Captain". In it's place I offer George Peppard and Jan Michael Vincent in the post-apocalyptic travelogue, "Damnation Alley". Most of the budget was apparently spent on an admittedly cool RV on steroids, with triangularly mounted revolving axles and three or four articulated segments. The vehicle does manage to out-act it's co-stars as they struggle through giant scorpions, cheesy mutants, and all the other usual "Day After" fun and games. I've seen better post-nuke stories on "Dexter's Lab"

apotheon
apotheon

Sky Captain wasn't that bad. I mean, really, the plot of Star Wars: the Phantom Plot was at least as bad. The Star Wars Christmas Special was even worse (you didn't say it had to be live action). My vote for worst color SF flick other than Plan 9 would have to be "American Cyborg Steel Warrior" or "Steel Warrior American Cyborg" or "Steel American Cyborg Warrior" -- it's hard to tell, the way the title was fonted. Well, that, or this movie I saw whose name I don't recall that included an evil alien obviously made out of a beach ball and an attempt to defuse a bomb by using existentialism to confuse its controlling AI.

Neon Samurai
Neon Samurai

Dare I speak it's name? Ah, crap, I can't remember it at the moment. It was a bad game to movie sci fi based on the the series of space flight sims from the 90s. All I can say is gravity in space. I had complete suspension of disbelief up until I saw crash carnage sweap off the edge of the runway and watched it fall like being swept off a sea-locked aircraft carrier. That definately earns a place on the colour list of bad sci fi.. if only I could remember the name. Sky Captain was fun if you could disregard th e glaring plot holes. I liked the pulpfiction retro-tech.

rrwitham
rrwitham

I'm 63 and this movie got me hooked on realistic sci-fi movies when it came out in 1951 (I was 7). I bought a dvd of it recently and it has additional features about the movie that are really interesting.

apotheon
apotheon

I wish they'd cut out all the officer training stuff. What little they kept, they lampooned rather than attempting to faithfully translate to the screen. Don't see it unless you just [b]really[/b] want to see how badly someone can screw up a book-to-movie translation. Not only does it appear that the script was written by someone who never read the book, based on a book report written by a four year old rather than by an understanding of the original material (and it turns out that the director in fact stated he had never read the entire book), but there also were reports at the time it was released that Ed Neumeier and Paul Verhoeven (the producer/screenwriter and director, respectively) both hated Heinlein's work in general and this book in particular, and specifically set out to parody and discredit it, reversing much of the meaning of the book to convey an antithetical message. I think the book could actually be very well rendered to screen, though it probably wouldn't get much box office action because of the fact that a faithful translation would not appeal to the action film junkies, but the details of the movie would look far too action-oriented to draw in the thinkers that would actually enjoy it. Also, it wouldn't appeal to many women at all (sad but true, considering the gender specific social brainwashing women undergo in most cultures today). There's also the simple problem that libertarian leaning people -- those who should best identify with the subject matter -- mostly haven't thought through the social issues related to this film well enough to be able to differentiate between the Starship Troopers approach to national service and an authoritarian approach. It's very popular right now for libertarians to be anti-military, thanks in large part to George W. Bush, and I don't think many self-identified libertarians would be able to get past that to really grasp what's going on in the story. It could be an amazing military drama on-screen, if translated faithfully. I'm just not holding my breath. In the meantime, this maliciously "reinterpreted" implementation of the story is unbelievably bad.

apotheon
apotheon

"[i]In spirit, it has more to do with Heinlein than Total Recall, or Freejack have to do with their inspirations.[/i]" It's about on equal footing with both of them, in terms of adhering to the spirit of their inspirations. Have you actually [b]read[/b] Starship Troopers? If so -- was it in the last twenty years, and did you do more than skim? About all the movie has in common with the book is: 1. It has bug-like aliens. 2. It's interstellar war. 3. Characters have the same name. 4. Someone's arm gets broken. 5. Someone dies in training. Even the incidents of a broken arm and a dead trainee are completely ruined. They each were changed from a meaningful lesson that was the result of an accident to nothing but a gruesome display of the director's ability to portray cartoonish brutality. Where's the faithfulness of spirit in that? "[i]I would really like to see some independent producer make a version that is faithful to the origional work.[/i]" So would I.

apotheon
apotheon

Not only was Starship Troopers the movie something like what I'd expect if someone wrote a screenplay after having the book explained to him by a four year old, but the rumor is that the executive producer and director both hated the book, its author, and everything he stood for. It was, in other words, a deliberate sabotage. The book was thought-provoking, intelligent, and politically provocative. The movie was brainless shock-value slapstick.

apotheon
apotheon

. . . and it mostly stands up to observation and experience. Once they started creating movies based on other series, however, the numbering got all jumbled up.

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

The decision to make a movie out of it was ill-advised. The format of the book wasn't at all linear, and a lot of the Guide entries had to be left out. It's a book you read to go along for the ride, not caring if it has a destination. That type of work doesn't translate into two hours on screen. I declined to see it; my wife said it was "weak".

boxfiddler
boxfiddler

of bad Sci-Fi movies: Killers from Space. What was Peter Graves thinking?

louann
louann

The mini-series was spectacular - a movie made from my favorite book of all time... Anyone for melange??

systemsgod
systemsgod

That movie never had a chance. The story is way too convoluted and complex to wrap in a two hour movie. The background alone rated a movie in itself. If you hadnt read the book, you had no clue of what was going on, or what anything meant. After seeing the scenes with the guild navigator and that "mouth", I realized that the special effects people must have been seriously repressed sexually. My girlfriend saw that and freaked! Now, the book was seriously great sci-fi, and is one of my all time favs. All of the original Frank Herbert books in the series were also good, but, the first 3 were clearly the best (Dune, Dune Messiah, Children of Dune).

boxfiddler
boxfiddler

The Day the World Ended (1955) along with it's 1967 remake In the Year 2889. Listen to rhythm of the falling rain...

Tony Hopkinson
Tony Hopkinson

Waterworld was Costner swims to victory, whil Dennis has a laugh and cigar. Garbage from start to finish. Dune, was a seriously bad choice for a book to film transition. Visually parts of it were great, however but for the title and a few names I didn't recognise it. Battlefield Earth was made for Hollywood, except for two key issues. There weren't enough americans in it and it was too long. Juvenile, jingoistic and highly enjoyable as a book, a total waste of celluloid as a film.

pgm554
pgm554

These were not vey good movies. Battlefield: Earth was pretty stupid. Never would have been made if Travolta were not a Scientologist and Hollywood was kissing his butt.

boxfiddler
boxfiddler

could we have left out Battlefield Earth? lol I found it a very good book, but as with "The Stand" there is no way it could stand up to being made a movie, for the sheer volum of it as well as the bizarre intrigue and paranoia that is at the heart of it. Dune is another that reads incredibly well, but could never have made a good movie - far, far too much was lost in the making of that one. Kind of like trying to do Asimov's Foundation Trilogy or something - never work. And Waterworld, well... deadly dull bore.

apotheon
apotheon

It's still better, or at least far less painful to watch, than [i]American Cyborg Steel Warrior[/i].

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

Barb Wire! There, I guess I put you in your place.

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

I remember something I think was called "Dark Star" with an alien / 5-foot beach ball locked in one compartment of a ship. I can't remember what pretext they used to get the crew to interact with it if, a) it was dangerous, and b) it was already locked up. Very dark, way before grunge or goth; great way to save on the lighting budget and hide the lousy quality of the sets. I also remember having an Alan Dean Foster adaptation of it obviously written because the house payment was due. It didn't make much more sense than the movie. It was one of those ADF adaptations from early in his career.

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

"Again? But that trick never works!" "This time, for sure!" And like Bullwinkle pulling a "rabbit" out of his hat, you never get anything good when you base a movie on a video game. No, not even Lara Croft.

apotheon
apotheon

I haven't seen Wing Commander, but that sounds like it's probably what you were trying to remember.

apotheon
apotheon

Honestly, I wouldn't watch Barbarella. My first experience with that movie was when it came on TV when I was about sixteen. I sat through about forty-five minutes of it before I couldn't take it any longer and changed the channel. Barbarella is such an unutterably [b]bad[/b] movie that it doesn't matter how Jane Fonda looked in her heyday -- it's not worth watching.

spaul940
spaul940

Even though "The Day the Earth Stood Still" is an excellent movie and "Barbarella" is mostly camp albeit with Jane Fonda in her younger days, if both were on at the same time, which one would you watch (be honest - guys)?

cubeslave
cubeslave

Come to think of it, it holds up better than some of the alleged SF films made more recently. (I say this after recently seeing an ad for films that is about to permeire on the SciFi Channel.)

cubeslave
cubeslave

The movie is really bad press for the book. Points 1-8 just add up to a standard hollywood treatment, like Independance Day, or The 6th Day. Why pay someone to write a decent script when you can have one more explosion onscreen. Editing a film is so much easier when you don't have to worry about plot points or message and just have to make sure that the FX shots look cool.

apotheon
apotheon

"[i]As long as it is viewed as something separate and apart from the book (like most movies 'based' on Phillip K. Dick stories) it isn't so bad.[/i]" As long as it is viewed as something separate and apart from the book, it is: 1. mindless violence and shock-value material 2. cartoonish 3. woodenly acted 4. humorous at parts 5. a naive and amateurish bit of "social commentary" that utterly fails to make its point effectively -- someone tried to emulate the brilliance of Jonathan Swift's "A Modest Proposal" on the subject of fascism, but ended up with the overtly disfigured insipidity of Robert E. Howard's "Conan the Barbarian" on the subject of slapstick 6. full of excellent special effects 7. also full of entirely unbelievable details that shatter any possible suspension of disbelief -- such as piss-poor military tactics, asinine applications of technology, and dialog so atrocious it threatens to make the ears bleed 8. plagued by a plotline so trite as to beggar the imagination "[i]It is well know that Paul Verhoeven never finished reading the novel because he didn't like it.[/i]" I'm fully aware of that. He said it bored and depressed him (I'm curious about why he found it depressing), which is pretty much the effect the movie had on most people I know who hadn't read the book when they saw the movie -- other than the humorous parts. The campiness of the movie was as clumsy as that of the previous movie on which Neumeier and Verhoeven collaborated: Robocop. The botched, obtuse attempt to convey some kind of "message" or "moral" was similarly reminiscent of Robocop. If it didn't serve as an anti-advertisement for one of the best books ever written, I wouldn't consider it a waste of money to rent the DVD -- if only because its humorous parts and special effects might provide a little brainless entertainment if you don't want to have to think tonight. Because it serves the purpose of directly contradicting the actual substance of the book, however, and to give people an erroneous impression of such an excellent literary work, it's almost criminal to recommend it. edit: typo and grammatical consistency

cubeslave
cubeslave

As long as it is viewed as something separate and apart from the book (like most movies "based" on Phillip K. Dick stories) it isn't so bad. It is well know that Paul Verhoeven never finished reading the novel because he didn't like it. See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Starship_Troopers_(film)

apotheon
apotheon

Okay, I can whole-heartedly agree with the content of that post.

cubeslave
cubeslave

There was a surface layer of gender equality/neutrality: unisex showers, women in combat, piloting star ships. When the escape pod crashes into the hive it, it is the female character that keeps her cool. On the other hand, all major action is performed by males. Even after Carmen keeps herself from getting her brains sucked out (unlike her himbo podmate), Rico still has to come in and save the damsel in distress (guided by Carl). I admit the film followed the Hollywood playbook more than Heinlein's but all that was really lacking was a non-lethal resolution of the Dizzy-Rico-Carmen triangle, and someone winding up pregnant.

apotheon
apotheon

The women were set-pieces in the Starship Troopers movie. In even the most blatant space bimbo novels of Heinlein's, the women were commanding presences with more control over their own lives than the men around them. Hell, if anything, the roles of men and women were to a significant degree reversed in Heinlein's novels a lot of the time, as compared with real world social trends. In the Starship Troopers movie, by contrast, women were fluff-headed prizes to be won, and props in scenes basically intended to show how even tough guys can cry.

cubeslave
cubeslave

The film did pretty much completely avoid (can't say missed) the point and the tone of the book. There were more plot points carried over than in the other examples I gave. I have read a lot of Heinlein, and I remember seeing elements in ST that fit with his fiction from my point of view. I havn't seen the film in a while, so the female characters and how they were used in the story is the only thing that comes to mind at the moment.

boxfiddler
boxfiddler

weak. Several friends had raved about it - apparently not having read the book. It was a waste of time, really.

cubeslave
cubeslave

Another entry on the list of bad movies trying to pass as Science Fiction with Peter Graves.

Tony Hopkinson
Tony Hopkinson

Please nobody read that garbage by his son and that talentless twit Anderson.

apotheon
apotheon

I loved the special effects for the aliens' technology in Battlefield Earth. That sort of futuristic "dirty tech" is always great fun in the movies. I loved the clouds of black smoke, the rips in the air, the way the teleporting thingie made horrible, damaging noises like it was doing harm to reality itself. Great stuff. The movie was worth it for that, if for nothing else.

apotheon
apotheon

I'm always dismayed by the comments I keep running across about the Sci Fi channel Dune miniseries. They completely screwed up the translation of the book. Only someone who hasn't read the books can think the original SFC Dune miniseries is "good" -- and even then, I have to wonder. I'm concerned by the inability to recognize the cheap-ass reused desert sets reminiscent of the original Lost In Space TV series as a sign of something wrong, or the failure to notice that John Hurt -- normally a halfway decent actor -- provided a completely uninspired, dull, [b]annoying[/b] performance as Duke Leto. The dialog was stilted, poorly delivered, and completely unbelievable throughout most of the miniseries, the chemistry between characters was entirely missing about 98% of the time, and the way the plot was mangled sucked. Not only that but, like the movie but years later with far better technology at their disposal, they [b]still didn't have any ornithopters[/b]. WTF? Now . . . the [b]second[/b] miniseries was engaging and interesting, with far better direction, acting, sets, and special effects. I was very reluctant to watch the second miniseries, because of the fact it was a sequel to the first and I expected it to be similarly awful (I mean really, I couldn't stop laughing at the frou-frou, foppish, effeminate purple flouncy ensembles worn by the great, terrifying Sardaukar elite shock troops in the first miniseries). It was a pleasant surprise to discover that the second miniseries made very few of the first's mistakes, and only made those apparently because they were trying to maintain some continuity between the two, resulting in a very enjoyable viewing experience. No, the first SFC Dune miniseries wasn't good at all, and I have a hard time understanding how anyone could think it [b]was[/b] any good.

Tony Hopkinson
Tony Hopkinson

but it still missed one of the key themes of the books. The conscious evolution of humans as tools and or weapons.

DadsPad
DadsPad

I have the DVDs of this version and is much more detailed. I liked it better than the original movie.

boxfiddler
boxfiddler

We have left out "They Live"! Though I can't quite qualify that as a worst or a best. As it has been worth wasting my time on several times over, it's a goodie. Great commentary on consumerism and 'upper-class'/media sell out.

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

It apparently has scarred you for life. Maybe Netflix has it.

boxfiddler
boxfiddler

I find them equally goofy. And equally qualified to win the Sci-Fi booby prize. hmmmm

apotheon
apotheon

I really do think Barbarella was worse than Barb Wire. It was [b]almost[/b] as bad as [i]American Cyborg Steel Warrior[/i]. Almost. I want those two hours of my life back! Oh, the psychic scars are debilitating.

boxfiddler
boxfiddler

lol, I forgot all about that piece of something or other that rhymes with nit! :D

apotheon
apotheon

Are you a religious fundamentalist? I had no idea! Anyway . . . I never said I identified with the main character. I just said I liked the movie.

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

There's a lesson to be learned here, but I'm not sure what it is. I do know there's no space for you in my shelter...

cubeslave
cubeslave

An excellent argument for not allowing religious fundamentalists into your fallout shelter.

peter.wright
peter.wright

They certainly did! I rather liked the movie. A mission to destroy rogus asteroids etc that may one day endanger the earth. The captain whose seat had short circuited (killing him) so they froze his body but were still able to interact with his mind! Then there was the last bomb that started to think for itself! What a possability!

apotheon
apotheon

I loved [i]A Boy and His Dog[/i]! That's one of my favorite movies. People think I'm some kind of sicko when I say that, usually.

Antediluvian Paladin
Antediluvian Paladin

Are you thinking of Doctor Who? A Time Lord who traveled about in a time machine disguised as a British Police Box.

online
online

Heh...I just watched Dark Star for the first time in about 20 years. It was funny, but what's important is what came from it. The co-producer and writer (and one of the stars) was Dan O'Bannon, who wrote Alien (searching for the beachball through the ship was the inspiration for that movie). The other co-producer, composer and director was John Carpenter (The Fog, Starman, Big Trouble In Little China, etc). Personally, the intelligent bombs make the movie for me.

pmolina
pmolina

I was visiting my Sister in AZ and drove by Benson on the way to Bisbee - had the Dark Star song "Benson AZ" stuck in my head for miles. When I got back I had to download a copy off the web. As wack-o as the beachball was, the whole deal about teaching phenomenolology to a talking bomb is just priceless. And while we are talking the TRUE classics, lets not leave A Boy and His Dog off the list! (Everybody conjugate: copulae, copulie...)

pgm554
pgm554

Tom Baker Was also in The Golden Voyage of Sinbad Met him at a SF convention in Palo Alto

daveo2000
daveo2000

By the way, it isn't nearly as funny years later. The memory of it is much funnier. It was shown every year at the Purdue Mind Rot Film Festival during finals week at Purdue University. That, along with the Star Trek out-takes.

daveo2000
daveo2000

If you get a chance to see Dark Star again, do so. I refer to that movie in a similar was as the old Dr. Who with (can't remember the-curly-guy-with-the-scarf's name). Dr. Who was great partially BECAUSE of the cheesy special effects. Dark Star went to extra effort to make the props look cheap. For instance, there is one space suit that looks like a Mr. Steam unit and another that looks like a cupcake pan on top of a cookie sheet on top of a baking pan on top of a roasting dish, all covered in white plastic. BUT, after you look at all of this, you see that the proportions are wrong for the "real" things. They just wanted this stuff to LOOK like the real thing. I love it! :x :D Let there be light!

apotheon
apotheon

Wholly mudder o' gob, that was an awful movie! Great fun to watch and MST at it, but not even in the same universe as "art". As I recall, they initially thought the beach ball alien was cute, or something. Not that it was dangerous. It turned out it had a malicious streak a mile wide.

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

Any of the animated Batman movies from the last five or six years is superior to any of the live-action movies of the last twenty years. The Batman "Mr. Freeze" animated movie genuinely moved me. I truly felt sorry for him.

rick
rick

when I heard Doom was coming to theaters, I admit I was excited. Then they got "The Rock" to play the bad ass space marine .. ok I can go with that. And then disapointment ensues. I mean good vs evil? wtf was that, Doom has always been Space Marine vs zombies from hell, and demons and Hell Knights. I guess the director/producer/actors/studio never actually PLAYED Doom. But this *is* Hollywood we're talking about, I should've saw this butchering a mile away. I got the DVD as a birthday gift, and if I didn't alphabetize my DVD collection, it probably would be sitting between my Mortal Kombat Annihilation (plz someone explain to me why I bought that garbage) and my kids pokemon/sponge bob/justice leage/gi joe DVD's ...

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

I'm sure you have it on the shelf, right next to "Mortal Kombat" and "Pokemon" :-P

Neon Samurai
Neon Samurai

hehehe.. hopefully the sarcasm came through on that. My only saving grace in admitting to have sat through it all was that it wasn't in the theater.

Neon Samurai
Neon Samurai

That piece of hollywood magic called Wing Commander. That's the one. On of the ships crashes in during or after a battle and you see a bulldozer come out and push the debree off the edge of the landing strip and into space; where it falls with Gravity! Bahahahahaahaaa.. ah.. it was a fun movie but that was a whole too big to overlook. That reminds me now actualy of Last Star Fighter.. how is that peice of art not on the list? tehehehee.