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"You are likely to be eaten by a grue" - The rap video


In order to apologize for the MS-DOS 5 upgrade rap I foisted upon everyone a few days ago, and reconfirm the eternal coolness of Zork, I give you the video to nerdcore rapper MC Fontalot's "It Is Pitch Dark," which explains how Zork and its ilk of text adventures helped many an uber-dork cope with the scary world outside his basement--by making the world outside his basement seem even scarier. Found via BoingBoing.

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Jay Garmon has a vast and terrifying knowledge of all things obscure, obtuse, and irrelevant. One day, he hopes to write science fiction, but for now he'll settle for something stranger -- amusing and abusing IT pros. Read his full profile. You can a...

12 comments
Don't Read This
Don't Read This

They are at www.csd.uwo.ca/Infocom/Download Activision has released them for free. I played all three many years ago on a Compaq luggable with the little mono green screen, now I play them with my 10 year old daughter on my notebook. She types and I draw the maps. We have a blast!

Xwindowsjunkie
Xwindowsjunkie

but two Lisas sitting on the shelf unit behind his Apple on the desk. But what's really terrible is that I recognized them as a pair of Lisas! Wonder who they borrowed all the C64 equipment and boxes from?

Dr Dij
Dr Dij

No one has ever seen one. It lives in the darkest depths, its appetite for cave adventurers tempered only by it's fear of light. If you were dumb enuf to wander into the caves without lighting your lamp (or even remebering to pick up the lamp previously) you were toast, or actually, I guess, caviar on toast for the Grue. And since the trap door slammed shut after entry, your fate was sealed without a light. Classic computer game! I liked them because you had to figure stuff out, not just slash things with swords. (tho your elvish sword did glow when a grue was near) I actually played this on the MIT PDP-10's over the Arpanet, after hours. Got me interested in Macsyma symbolic math system. Boy that shows my age. That was 30 years ago, 1978!

OldER Mycroft
OldER Mycroft

...[quick look in mirror] yeah 26 years ago. I spent (lost) many many hours fighting, or more likely, avoiding that bloody grue. If nothing else it taught (forced) me to learn how to type faster and faster while remaining accurate. ...still got 'em all on a C64 emulator which interestingly also emulates the disk-access delays! Great stuff!

Dr Dij
Dr Dij

cd-rom for the PC now

Eric.Jablow
Eric.Jablow

Nethack is still in active development; even with ASCII graphics, it still is the greatest of first-person shooters. The Dev Team thinks of everything! Just watch out for the 'c's.

steve
steve

The dog was a lowercase "d" Feed him plenty of corpses and he'll get bigger even fight for you.

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

You still typed commands, but it had an ASCII representation of the dungeons. You were represented by an ampersand ( @ ), but I don't remember the dog's symbol. After each command the display refreshed, and the dog's symbol was liable to appear in any explored area of the dungeon at random. If you named the dog ( 'name dog dogname' ) and fed it ( 'feed dogname' ), it would stick closer to you and was a useful defensive ally. I wish I could remember the name, because that would make it much easier for me to find it again.

Dr Dij
Dr Dij

one of the later Zorks? they became graphical after a while, I think some you still typed in words n,s,e,w or put coal in washing machine (turned it into a diamond of course!)

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

One of those ASCII-graphic dungeon games gave you a dog you could name. Anybody remember which one?