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Poll: Is Google Music the bandwidth breaker?

Take our poll and we'll find out if the streaming music services are starting to overwhelm network bandwidth.

I like music as much as anyone and I have a job here at TechRepublic that affords me the opportunity to listen to music often during a work week. Listening to the right music from my iPod on my headphones while editing can be the best way for me to achieve the needed focus, especially if there is an extraordinary amount of activity in the office.

So, as the editor of the Google in the Enterprise Blog, when I saw the press releases that Google Music was available, I thought I'd better check it out. The Google service works pretty much like the Amazon Cloud Player - music you have purchased from the Android Marketplace or that you have uploaded to Google Music is available for streaming. All you need is a Web browser.

Extremely convenient for users, but I am wondering how much fun these streaming services are for IT administrators? Are the streaming music services starting to overwhelm network bandwidth? Are IT professionals implementing procedures to reduce the traffic users generate for "non-work related" activities? Or is bandwidth so plentiful, that the activity is not a concern?

About

Mark Kaelin is a CBS Interactive Senior Editor for TechRepublic. He is the host for the Microsoft Windows and Office blog, the Google in the Enterprise blog, the Five Apps blog and the Big Data Analytics blog.

5 comments
Willam2011
Willam2011

I'm addicting with Grooveshark and don't feel that it will take my bandwidth away. But what I wonder is why google jump in music market?? As I see, Google music makes no difference or has more advantage over existing providers such as Apple iTune, and Amazon cloud player.

jdm12
jdm12

Music streaming is tiny compared with video streaming. In the broader world, the telecom people simply don't want to upgrade their hardware to accommodate the demand because they make too much money as things stand. They want your service to drag so they can charge you more, without actually doing anything. In other words, the pipe is big enough, but there is a valve on it which they control to suit their own interests.

wizard57m-cnet
wizard57m-cnet

is in the data caps on mobile device plans. Can you imagine the "shock and awe" some parents could get when they open their cellular data plan after adding little Joe and Jane with the new 4G devices/phones and the minimum data plans to see that the "youngens" have went over their caps while streaming music and YouTube? I think this will be the first group to raise cane over excessive rates being charged for wireless data!!

Mark W. Kaelin
Mark W. Kaelin

Are streaming music services like Google Music causing problems on your organization's networks? Are you restricting access to these services? Have you had to alter policies?

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