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Poll results: Project Glass annoying fad or wave of future?

Google upped the ante on Project Glass at their 2012 Google I/O conference, but are we buying into it.

Back in April 2012, I made it very clear that I was very skeptical about the merits of Google's Project Glass. The idea that ordinary people would walk around with glasses that augmented their vision with overlays and other interactive clues was abhorrent to me. I was not the only one.

As a counterpoint, I asked Marziah Karch to write a post for the Google in the Enterprise Blog explaining why Project Glass is more than a marketing ploy. She made some compelling arguments and I am trying hard to keep an open mind.

Next step

Well, Google was apparently not dissuaded by initial public opinion because at their June 2012 I/O conference they reiterated their belief in the concept. As far as Google is concerned, the concept will be a reality in the not so distant future. They even announced that developers could get their hands on a prototype for a mere $1,500.

But once again, the video they created to show the "benefits" of this technology involved something most people will never do - skydiving. Taking video while skydiving is not revolutionary; it has been done many times before. If Google wants to sell the Project Glass concept to me, they had better come up with something more substantial.

IT pros need convincing

Looking at the poll results from April, I can be counted with the majority of respondents who feel Project Glass is not really a product they are itching to get their hands on. Perhaps Google is barking up the wrong tree with this one?

Has Google's I/O conference push of Project Glass changed your mind about the concept? Will you be purchasing a $1,500 prototype so you can develop software for the augmenting glasses?

About

Mark Kaelin is a CBS Interactive Senior Editor for TechRepublic. He is the host for the Microsoft Windows and Office blog, the Google in the Enterprise blog, the Five Apps blog and the Big Data Analytics blog.

21 comments
spydr_cl
spydr_cl

This is still prototype. Late stages, alebit, but pushing the envelope enough to start discussing "smart accesories" that go beyond the glasses. And although filming skydiving was done many times before, it was the first time (as I understand it) that it is transmitted LIVE by the actual diver to a LIVE audience. Dunno if it'll be in a "glasses" format but there will be devices hooked up onto us that will augment what we see.

AudeKhatru
AudeKhatru

My opinion of the technology hasn't changed. 1. Cool idea 2. Terrible execution, the things look laughable 3. Not ready for prime time When I can wear a full lens glass and the thing gives me a heads up display that gives me really useful information, like some of the things mentioned in the comments. Can it show me all the cars in my field of vision, including all my mirrors and Doppler shift them for me. So that I know who is moving slower than me and who is moving faster. Instantly highlight any movement into or out of my lane. What we want is the Terminator's visual display, not the ability to strap a camera to our heads. We can already do that. So, what we have is a not even beta technology that developers are being ALLOWED to pay $1500 to experience without even knowing if the things are ever going to go public and even if they do, at $1500 these are something that weathy yuppies are going to buy because they think it will make them look cool and as soon as they are out of sight, everyone will mutter "a$$hole" under their breath.

rglenn1019
rglenn1019

There are more positives than negatives to the possibilities. My concern is, with using these, they will become a pretty much constant tool. Won't this have the potential to cause vision problems?

tonymoore42
tonymoore42

There is one valuable and immediate niche for Google Glass (GG) that I can think of... as a media for delivering written job instructions (job aids) and coaching in real time in situations where no other media would work. For example, an electrician working atop a tall pole could access wiring diagrams to guide his work while leaving both hands free to do the work. Another example: A doctor or surgeon sitting at a computer in an emergency room could see and hear the patient's symptoms through the onsite EMT's GG and direct the EMT through a step-by-step complicated life-saving procedure. Another example: A technician troubleshooting a difficult problem with an automated manufacturing line on a factory floor could access process/line diagrams, online troubleshooting algorithms, and process indicators (in real time), and control the line via GG--all while crawling around, under, and over the line--without having to carry a laptop or return to the workstation. What a time and labor saver! A final example: A police officer who, through training and experience, has become an expert in identifying and mitigating potential attacks by suicide bombers, sitting in the comfort and safety of his office, could observe a large public event from distributed vantage points through the GG worn by onsite police officers. The expert's eyes, ears, and experience detect subtle, but critical, indicators of a potential situation that the patrolling officers might miss. As the situation evolves, the actions of onsite officers can be directed and coordinated from HQ. Lives could be saved.

andrew232006
andrew232006

As someone who paid a few thousand dollars last year to stop wearing glasses, I can't imagine people choosing to wear them all the time.

MarkWAliasQ
MarkWAliasQ

There are so many things that can be done with this but just the fact I will be able to know who I'm talking to from now on sells it for me.

dogknees
dogknees

Does no one understand the concept that you don't have to wear them all the time? That maybe you'd take them off when driving? That because something exists you don't have to use it, and if you do, you don't have to use it all the time? The other part of the argument is that life is getting more complex and we're going to have to invest more intellectual effort if we choose to buy into new technologies. This isn't going to stop any time soon.

Mark W. Kaelin
Mark W. Kaelin

Has Google's I/O conference push of Project Glass changed your mind about the concept?

MarkWAliasQ
MarkWAliasQ

If I had time, I think I could hit 4 figures no problem at all.

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

We can't get people to stop reading messages or looking at photos while driving now. Why do you think these would be any better? They're more of a temptation, since you don't have to keep looking down at the phone and can operate hands free. Sure, your head is up, but are your eyes focused a couple of hundred feet down the road, or close-in on the stock market ticker?

MarkWAliasQ
MarkWAliasQ

I.E. A motorbike coming up on your far LH or RH field of vision could be flashing red as could children coming out from behind cars.

rhonin
rhonin

Look past the "glasses" version. This is basically allowing personal HUD. If I could get specific functions on my prescription glasses.... Take your car for instance - Many cars today are using HUD or DIV (display in view) design and technology so a driver does not have to glance away and take their eyes off of the road. Now apply that same technology while you are walking. Stop, look in a store window - information provided as wanted (or needed). Look at it from a first responder - live real time information updates. How about sporting events? Or FPS games? What about a paintball competition? The application is endless. Don't get caught up in the physical appearance of the prototype glasses as they are now. I fully expect to see some extreme sports person wearing a pair and sharing live soon.

dogknees
dogknees

Just because a proportion of people do dumb things isn't a reason for the rest of us not to use this sort of tech. Even if the proportion is 90%.

learn4ever
learn4ever

Let the car manufacturers look after this... and they are.

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

assuming the driver isn't watching last night's game or his girlfriend's latest sext message instead. I'm betting they majority will use this as the next evolution of their smartphone, another device to fiddle with. Besides, you can get too much information. So a motorbike is coming up? Why would I change my driving pattern? He's the one coming up on me. At what point do we flag children between cars? One could just be walking around to get in the door, not chasing a ball into the street. School zones would be a mass of color.

seanferd
seanferd

If you don't care enough about your safety to wear a helmet (or even a shirt), and you don't pay attention and drive appropriately for conditions and traffic, and auto drivers don't pay attention either, you are all quite welcome to each other. Shorter: Technology isn't going to help if no one is paying attention anyway, unless it is able to take control of your vehicle. And no Freedom-Loving™, Red-Blooded™, American™ is going to have any of that.

Jordon
Jordon

You'll start worrying more about motorcycle riders when they start wearing helmets? So an uninformed person is of lesser value to you than one that's informed? No big deal. Run em over if they're not wearing a helmet. They deserve it. At the risk of getting negative votes or even getting this post pulled, I've got no problem telling you, that you are a POS.

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

I originally misunderstood you; here 'coming up on you' means approaching you from behind. Your second post made me realize you meant I'm approaching him. I see your point without grant it. I'll worry more about them when they start wearing helmets, something that isn't required here and that few use. A helmetless rider tells me he doesn't care about his safety in the first place. Why should I?

MarkWAliasQ
MarkWAliasQ

It's how a lot of people on motorbikes die. People in cars pull out of junctions because they don't notice them coming. Same goes for kids walking out from behind cars. It would be possible to highlight or emphasis these potential issues and of course positively discriminate against anything that is obvious like a mass school exodus.

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