Virtualization

How do I... Install VMware Server 1.04 onto an Ubuntu Linux system?

<img src="http://t.cbsimg.net/i/z/200606/how_110x85.jpg" align="right" border="0" height="85" hspace="5" vspace="5" width="110" />As of late, my interest in Linux has been peaking and I loaded <a href="http://www.techrepublic.com/search/index.php?t=1&amp;s=0&amp;o=1&amp;q=VMware+Server" target="_blank">VMware Server</a> on a spare computer running Linux to do some testing. Performance is excellent and I wanted to share with you the necessary steps required to load VMware Server on <a href="http://www.techrepublic.com/search/index.php?t=1&amp;s=0&amp;o=1&amp;q=Ubuntu+Linux" target="_blank">Ubuntu Linux</a>.

As of late, my interest in Linux has been peaking, and I loaded VMware Server on a spare computer running Linux to do some testing. Performance is excellent, and I wanted to share with you the necessary steps required to load VMware Server on Ubuntu Linux.

This blog post is also available in PDF form in a TechRepublic download and also in the form of a TechRepublic gallery.

To effectively install VMware Server on Ubuntu Linux, you must first assign a password to the super user (su) by opening the Terminal from Applications | Accessories | Terminal to get to the screen shown in Figure A.

Figure A

Terminal

You will type the commands shown in Figure A to configure a super user root password. Next, type su and login as root. You are now ready to prepare the environment with the necessary tools to compile VMware. You can prepare the environment by typing the following commands in the Terminal window:

aptitude install linux-headers-'uname -r' build essential (<strong>Figure B</strong>)
aptitude install xinetd (<strong>Figure C</strong>)

Figure B

Prepare Environment 1

Figure C

Prepare Environment 2

Now it is time to download VMware Server or VMware Workstation. After downloading the software, you will also need to download a patch that allows VMware Server to run on Ubuntu Linux.

Note: Do not forget to register for VMware Server. It requires a serial number that you will receive only if you register. Registration is a small price to pay for free software.

Let's install VMware Server by right-clicking on the tar file and extracting the file to the /tmp directory. Simply right-click on the tar file and choose Open with Archive Manager. Next, click Extract and in Places, choose Files | System | Tmp. The VMware-server-distrib folder will extract to the /tmp directory.

Now, let's open the Terminal and browse to the tmp directory and to the VMware-server-distrib directory. Once inside the VMware-server-distrib directory, type the following:

./VMware-install.pl (<strong>Figure D</strong>)
Note: Remember to log in as super user, as shown in Figure A.

Figure D

Install VMware

You will be asked a series of questions. Please accept the defaults. Toward the end of the installation you will be asked the following question:

"Before running VMware Server for the first time, you need to configure it by invoking the following command: /usr/bin/VMware-config.pl. Do you want this program to invoke the command for you now?" Yes is the default, but you should type No, as we have to load a patch first that will allow VMware Server to work on Ubuntu Linux.

Follow the same procedures above to extract the contents of the patch to the /tmp directory. After you copy the update to the /tmp directory, open the terminal, log in as super user, and browse to the VMware-any-any-update113 folder (Figure E).

Figure E

Patch VMware for Linux

Type the following: command:

./runme.pl
The patch completes and you are asked if you want to invoke or run VMware-config.pl. Choose Yes this time and accept the default to finish the installation of VMware Server (Figure F). We are in the homestretch now; stay with me.

Figure F

Installation complete

You now must accept the EULA and continue through the VMware Server install, accepting the defaults. Next, accept the defaults to finish the installation. During the installation, you will be asked for a serial number. You must register for your free serial number, so if you don't have it, you can enter it later and just accept the default of cancel.

Now log in to VMware Server by opening a Terminal and typing the following command:

/usr/bin/vmware (<strong>Figure G</strong>)

Figure G

Start VMware
The VMware Console appears. Click Connect (Figure H) to connect to the console locally. If you want to manage your virtual machines, you can download the Server Console client directly from VMware and connect to your virtual machines from any machine on your network. You can also use remote desktop protocol (RDP) to connect to Windows machines from anywhere on your network.

Figure H

Console
You are now ready to build and load your virtual machines (Figure I) on the Linux platform.

Figure I

Virtual machines

Loading a virtual machine works the same way in Windows. You can either pop a CD-ROM in the drive or mount an ISO image. Good Luck!

60 comments
EricBaenen
EricBaenen

Another use... both my son's have Ubuntu running on their desktops. I have VMware Player installed via the repositories/Synaptic. I've then created a series of virtual machines with (legal versions) of Win98, Win2K and WinXP to run their legacy windoze games. I create the virtual machine on my desktop under server using iso images of their game cd's mounted as virtual cd-rom drives and with the iso images permanently embedded in the vm directory. Then I tar/gzip up the vm directory and copy it to their machines. If they mess up a virtual machine I just delete the vm directory and unzip the original - back in business. And with the game cd images mounted as virtual cdrom drives - they never have to touch the physical discs to play their games. Note - this only works for games that are not too graphically intense - does not work very well at all for heavy 3D games - not really playable.

EricBaenen
EricBaenen

IF... you are using Feisty Fawn (Ubuntu 7.04)... Ubuntu 7.10 should be ready before long... If using Ubuntu server... edit /etc/apt/sources.list and add 'deb http://archive.canonical.com/ubuntu feisty-commercial main' to the end of the file. Then 'sudo apt-get update' then 'sudo apt-get install vmware-server'. You'll still need to have registered to get the free license key. If using Ubuntu workstation - run System menu -> Administration menu -> Synaptic --- add 'deb http://archive.canonical.com/ubuntu feisty-commercial main' to the third party repositories - reload the lists from the repositories then search and install 'vmware-server'. This way you will also get automatic updates and kernel modules. If you install the manual way - you'll need to re-run the installer script each time your machine gets a kernel update.

EricBaenen
EricBaenen

Having years of experience with VMware on Linux (and Windows) - Windows virtualized on top of Linux works MUCH better than Linux virtualized on top of Windows. The Windows GUI has far too much overhead and the Linux kernel is virtualization friendly. Also - if you are actually virtualizing servers - you can disable the gui in Linux and on the Linux virtual machines so there is no overhead used by even the Gnome gui when running the virtual machines. The host and virtual machines run stricly command line - no gui. But you can always log in and run 'startx' to get the gui temporarily to do administrative tasks. Log out of the gui and you'll go back to command line. To disable the gui in the host or virtual machine - in Ubuntu just log in as the initial user and run 'sudo rm /etc/rc2.d/S13gdm' to put it back run 'sudo ln -s /etc/init.d/gdm /etc/rc2.d/S13gdm' to recreate the soft link. Then you can run more virtual machines on the same host with the same resources.

EricBaenen
EricBaenen

Just run the commands prefixed by 'sudo' when logged in as the initial user (the user you created when installing Ubuntu - the one that has been given administrative privileges via the sudo command).

pennatomcat
pennatomcat

BartPE. It requires Service Pack 1 or greater--I have an XP installation CD with SP zero. Right now I'm using VMplayer on WinXP (works great). Will VMware Server's (or Workstation) ability to create appliances allow me to circumvent this problem?

BALTHOR
BALTHOR

I think that a lot of this software comes from the hardware industry.The Internet started out as a fax network then somebody added a monitor then somebody unwittingly tried a computer and now we're web surfing!Fax machines needed an OS so there was Microsoft.The OS would be the system that the fax machine needed to make fax files.The Government Torrent network already existed so that was the one that was implemented.Broadcast used the Torrent for satellite link up,industry used to torrent to ship flash files and so on.The switcher would connect to the Telephone line and receive the newest update or upgrade.

Ray Collazo
Ray Collazo

http://www.getautomatix.com/ This is a Fantastic tool that all first-installations of Ubuntu should download and Run! Not only does it massively simplify the installation of VMware Server, but it also helps to install quite a few additional programs such as Realplayer, Opera, DVD Codecs, and quite a few other programs! Simply download the .deb, install it, and it will make a few additions to your /etc/apt/sources.list file (which you can easily examine afterwards), and then it presents an extremely easy to use and intuitive GUI, much like Synaptic does! I wish I would have known about this tool earlier, it would have made my Ubuntu installation that much more painless!!

jlhawk
jlhawk

How timely... last evening I installed Ubuntu to a virtual maching running on Windows 2003 server (VMWare 1.03 running on a server 2003 SP2 machine) all went well, but I've been unable to install the VMWare tools... I unpacked the file to my user folder, opened a terminal window, changed to that folder, but whe I run the .pl to install the tools it tells me it cannot find the file, yet when I look the file is in that folder... would anyone be willing to get me detailed instructions to get the tools working... it's a mess until VMtools gets installed... it's been years since I played with Linux and my knowledge of the commands is weak and limited... thanks

spdmarine
spdmarine

Will the same set of commands/concept work with Red Hat?

antoniu-george.savu
antoniu-george.savu

Forget VMWare. Get something truly open-source, VirtualBox. http://www.virtualbox.org/ for more information. I have discovered VirtualBox after having troubles installing the latest VMWare Server Linux distribution under a Debian 4.0 (Etch) system running a custom 2.6.22.6 kernel. The VMWare VMON module just don't compile, with or without vmware-any-any-update113.

brian.mills
brian.mills

Is there any performance boost to running VMWare server as opposed to the workstation or player implementations? I know there's a certain amount of overhead above and beyond the RAM used by each vm, but I was just wondering how server compared to the other two vm implementations. I already have a blank vm that I just copy/paste and then load my OS of choice on when I need to test something new, so I really don't need creation capabilities. I just want the smallest impact on the performance of my system when I'm running the vm.

mircea.mitu
mircea.mitu

"To effectively install VMware Server on Ubuntu Linux, you must first assign a password to the super user (su)" Why do you need to set a root password? All you need to do is "sudo -s" and you'll get a shell with root priviledges. Setting up a root password increases the security risk.

shardeth-15902278
shardeth-15902278

I was doing a little exploring and it appears that the commercial is there for 7.10, but they no longer call it commercial, they call it partner. Here is the link to the release notes... http://www.ubuntu.com/getubuntu/releasenotes/710 About halfway down under the heading commercial/partner repository they have a blurb, and the list deb http://archive.canonical.com/ gutsy partner as the new repository entry. (Please correct me if I'm wrong, ianalg).

shardeth-15902278
shardeth-15902278

At least for Linux VM's. Not sure if there is a benefit for Windows VM's or not. But the newest Ubuntu supports VMWARE's paravirtualization, which is supposed to give a pretty good performance boost to VM's.

Boomslang
Boomslang

Despite the fact that some things on the internet seem to be hacked together and cobbled up in the manner you described, I take it that this is a "tongue-in-cheek" comment? If not, you'll need to consult a rather extensive body of history that will describe in great detail what really is involved in OS development, networking, etc. before commenting on anything technical. BTW originally, monitors were Teletype Machines, fax was never involved. Think clattering mechanical typewriters that would devour boxes of fanfold paper.

mggulley
mggulley

After reading and trying to understand what you wrote, I have to make an assumption about your mental health. I am sorry for the pain and confusion must be feeling. I am also sorry that I read your post. Not one to be making fun of the mentally ill I thought I would reply to your post. I may have cheated alittle (reandom paragraph genarator)But it still stands true?? "A charming gasp unites Internet without the poorest static. Internet accomplishes How it all started into the sighted wolf. In the robot riots How it all started. Internet antiques the strict volunteer within the terminology. When will Internet exit inside How it all started? Will the pain resist the alarming charm?" And I end quotes.

Tig2
Tig2

The internet started as a governmental project. Fax has nothing to do with it. Do you ever stop to think???

njaneardude
njaneardude

Absolutely corect! I'm a 'buntu n00b and a Windoz double clicking fool and I installed Automatix and simplified the install of many programs on my Ubuntu box : )

Oktet
Oktet

Automatix totally rocks for "noobs," and I like the fact that the CEO of Dell, Michael Dell also uses Automatix2. I personally don't have a Dell, nor do I need a Dell, I build my own; however, for its simplicity Automatix is cool. Now that's simplifying life.

M_Ski
M_Ski

# ./.pl I dunno why, but it works...

M_Ski
M_Ski

Before runing the VMWare .rpm, you need to ensure three things are installed # yum install xinetd # yum install kernel-devel # yum install gcc Then run the VMWare .rpm # cd /tmp # chmod 777 VMWare* # rpm -ivh VMWare-s Then run the installation .pl file (I can't recall the exact file name.) # ./vmware-config.pl I changed the port from the default 904 to 902 (Not sure why. Another branch of the company has been using this for a while and passed that along...) Do not attempt to enter the registration code until you get into GUI mode, the installation prompt won't take it. Install the MUI (Management Interface) # tar -zxf VMWare-m That unpacks the tarball into a directory called vmware-mui-dis... # cd vmware-m # ls (find the perl script file) # ./.pl Once that is done, run setup (or better yet, Webmin www.webmin.com) and open firewall ports 8333:tcp and 902:tcp (unless you took the default of 904:tcp) If you run Webmin, you will also need to open port 10000:tcp for it to work. My guest VMs seem to work fine with the Linux firewall up. (Again, not sure why) I setup the Cisco switchport to allow multiple VLANs, and the guest OSs seem to be OK with those as well. I thought I would have to setup sub-interfaces to do the VLAN tagging, but it just worked without any fuss... Open a web browser from your management station and go to https://:8333, and you can install the management tools. I have the advantage of access to an Asterisk developer/implementer who has setup a number of CentOS 5 (RHEL-compatible) servers. He had me setup kerberos authentication, sudoers, and PAM so that delegated users can log into the box with thier AD credentials and elevate priviledges, if needed. This also requires good time sync, so you need to add a couple NTP servers into /etc/ntp.conf You can use PAM to permit users to log into the VMware tools with thier AD account as well, so most administrators do not need to know the root password. In fact, our Unix admin suggested creating a privledged local user account that only management knows, and setting the root's encrypted password (via Webmin) to ! as that effectively disables the root account from interactive and network logins.

darko
darko

VMware player and server are already in Ubuntu repositories. Just use Synaptic Package Manager from Administration menu!

TheGooch1
TheGooch1

Well, Server SI is free, that was a big plus for me. Plus you need server to autostart a VM without having to login to the host system. Also, from what little ready I have done on server features it sandboxes the VM's better than workstation. One minus is that the current version of the server need VM's made with Workstation version 5.0 or earlier, it doesn't support six. For more info go to VMWare's Web site. When you are there, look for the VMWare mobility document that explains compatibility between Server 1.x and other VMWare products.

Jaqui
Jaqui

BULLSH|T!! NOT having a root password is a severe security risk. all the *buntu distros make the critical error of disabling the root account, making them no more secure than a default, NOT IT PRO install of any version of windows. no root password / account = NO SYSTEM ADMIN ACCOUNT you twit. that is an assinine configuration that should be illegal.

Steven S. Warren
Steven S. Warren

From my research, I had to set a password to properly install VMware Server. I will have to try to install using your advice to see if it works. Thanks -ssw

kermidge
kermidge

...and before fanfold, spools of punched paper tape. Early '79, we picked up a surplus Teletype and bread-boarded an interface so's we could use it as I/O device for the Altair we'd just assembled. Beat the heck out of flipping all them switches on the front panel.

steve7g
steve7g

Most linux distros will not have the current directory ie "." in the default PATH for a user profile. Having the current dir in the default PATH is a (slight) security risk.

shardeth-15902278
shardeth-15902278

When you enter a command at the prompt, Linux searches for that command in each of the directory listed in your path. The current Directory ( './')is not included in your path ("echo $PATH" to see what it looks like. you can add it if you want. I think the idea of leaving it off is one of security. The path only includes those locations you explicitly want to just be able run common commands from. For everything else, you must specify the precise location.

jlhawk
jlhawk

Thanks... I'll give it a try tonight... it has been driving me crazy... been trying to find a solution, and recalling command syntax from my unix days, and so far nothing I've tried has worked... I'll let you know how I make out...

TheGooch1
TheGooch1

Another solution is to install it on Windows. I found that you just click install, select the defaults, and then just go do something that is actually important while it does its thing. You can thank me later when you count how much time that you saved by not messing with dependencies.

DomBenson
DomBenson

VMware Server is in the commercial repository, but the Gutsy (7.10) commercial repo is not yet available. As such, gutsy users should install using this method (excepting the root password).

EricBaenen
EricBaenen

Your confusion over the use of root in Ubuntu is understandable. It is a different way of thinking that many people have a hard time getting use to. The root account password is disabled - but the root account still exists and many processes still run as the root user - most of the start up apps/scripts. The password is disabled because root is the account most attacked on Linux systems - it's always there, its always UID 0 and it's always called 'root' - but if you cannot login as root it is much harder to hack. The first user created on installation is a special user. That user is given administrative privileges via the sudo command. Without using the sudo command (or graphical equivalents) this user is just a plain normal user. However, when you log in as this initial user and run an administrative app and it asks you for your password - you are actually using the graphical version of sudo to temporarily elevate your privileges (only for the duration of needing to do an administrative action). Once the app or script is complete - you're back to being a normal unprivileged user. In order for someone to gain privileged access to your machine via a login account - they would have to know the username you chose for the initial install. You can also give other login accounts selective elevated privileges by modifying the /etc/sudoers file... ie. as the initial user... sudo gedit /etc/sudoers because 'root' owns this file. You can also create additional users with a UID of 0 which makes them the same as root - though many Linux systems complain about this and it's less secure because if someone gets your /etc/passwd file they can easily see which accounts are equal to root - so they know which ones to target. Then again - if someone gets your /etc/passwd file - they can guess that the user with UID 1000 is probably the first account you created - the one with sudo privileges. Ultimately, disabling login as root and giving selective admin privileges via sudo is more secure - regardless of what Linux distro you are using.

MidZoneTec
MidZoneTec

The security philosophy of Ubuntu is to keep exposure of root elevated priveledges to a minimum by having all users log into lower priveledged accounts for work that does not require root access and then having the user elevate their priviledges for work requiring root access with the su command. An admin can restrict executable access to the su command to a group of trusted users. This works because Linux is more compatmentalized than Windows. Take a couple of deep breaths, read up on Linux security and maybe go out to the Ubuntu site and read why it is set up that way. Ther are many security models and this is just one. Calling names just shows ignorance.

john
john

i have vm workstation installed on 7.04, all i did was to sudo the install. safer than su, as the permission drop back to user when the current action has finished. plus dont need to go to root to run vm

M_Ski
M_Ski

Thanks! I added the line pathmunge ./ to the #Path manipulation section of /etc/profile Now when I log in, the $PATH does not include the new variable, but when I sudo su, it is there. I can now run the scripts without having to prefix the filename with "./".

shardeth-15902278
shardeth-15902278

The windows install is way easier (most of the time). Unless of course, you are running a system with 4GB of RAM, and you actually want to be able to USE all 4 GB... Or you have a 64-bit processor and more than 4GB of RAM that you want to be able to use, and it has a disk controller that the manufacturer didn't create a 64-bit driver for... Or if you don't actually have a windows license, and don't want to pay for one... Funny thing though, I don't remember having to chase any dependencies when I installed on Debian, and I used the Apotheon method for the install, so I am fairly sure I didn't accidentally include anything...dunno...

shardeth-15902278
shardeth-15902278

VMWARE (up through 3.0, anyway) includes a console which is a hardened version of RHEL. The console was how you interacted with the VMKernal. VMWare itself is not built on Linux. In fact, they have stripped out the Linux Console for their next version.

alaniane
alaniane

fine if you want to install it on a Windows machine; however, not everyone uses Windows. Also, some of us use multiple operating systems. Why should I limit my development to Windows only?

Daniel.Muzrall
Daniel.Muzrall

VMware's implementation of their ESX server (paid, Enterprise server) is actually a Linux installation. Once installed, ESX server allows you to create and manage VMs. Itcosts a bit (~$6000+, and then the hardware to run it), but it has some great features.

Totohydra
Totohydra

If you've ever installed VMware server on Windows, tried running five-eight guests on a modest machine, and then tried the same guests on an Ubuntu Server ed. host, the difference is like night and day. I never realized how much GUI bloat is tied up in Windows until I set up a Linux-based host. Unreal.

lionroar
lionroar

Thank you that was very helpfull, I always wonder why I could not login and root and always ended up either login in as admin through sudo command or changing the root password word. Been wondering why having different types of editor for changing important file is Ubuntu. I like the "gedit" command because of its ease of use, but when I comes to using something like "VIM" or something like that I am at a loss. Cannot seem to easily grasp on using it and do not find it user friendly like gedit. Maybe I just need to use it more often to understand it.

mikael.fransson
mikael.fransson

...is your sad attitude. Just because it's different from what you learned (and got stuck with) doesn't mean that it's wrong. You should also try to get the facts straight befory you cry like a baby, Root is created without predefined password, it does not have a password, but it does not have an empty password either, you just can't login. It's also easy to change so that you can handle it the only way you seem to know how... :~$ sudo passwd Password: Enter new UNIX password: Retype new UNIX password: Get real and grow up! /Mikael

Jaqui
Jaqui

disabling root login is the ultimate screwup. one user on the system, one password. 95% of people who will install Ubuntu / Kubuntu .. will use THAT EXACT SAME PASSWORD online. no root password is CRIMINAL on the part of the Ubuntu developers. anyone that thinks disabling root is good needs to be shot for stupidity,.

EricBaenen
EricBaenen

If you have multiple people using the root account - there is no accountability. When looking at the log files to see what happened and who did what - all you will see is 'root' did something - but you won't know who was using the root account. By disabling the root login and giving each person that needs it privileges with sudo - any time an administrative action is performed the log file will register who did it. Then you know who to specifically flog for doing something dumb. ;-)

TheGooch1
TheGooch1

I am pretty sure if you install Ubuntu using the "-noroot" switch, all the apps run as either "nobody" or a regular joe user account.

Mond0
Mond0

What you're saying is a perfect instance of Benford's Law of Controversy

Jaqui
Jaqui

is secure is in need of a brain.

Jaqui
Jaqui

no system admin account by disabliong root account is a ZERO security configuration. don't beleive the lies Ubuntu tells you about a no system admin config being secure.

Totohydra
Totohydra

...of some anxiety medication, didn't he?

lionroar
lionroar

I think that the individual is talking about Fedora, no sudoers privaledges permitted.

alaniane
alaniane

the lack of a user-defined password does not mean that no root account exists. Ubuntu creates a random root password if the user does not define one. I don't think it's possible to have Linux system that does not have a root account.

Totohydra
Totohydra

sudo su (the shell when then ask you for your password) When you see the # symbol at the prompt that means everything you do from that point will be as root. Normally you do not actually know what the root password is in Ubuntu. Ubuntu Server edition is actually best for setting up a VMware host since it doesn't have GUI overhead and most work after the install will be done from a web interface (even from your Windows box!)

Steven Warren
Steven Warren

I am not a veteran on Linux and appreciate all the tips.

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